what is oral history n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
What is Oral History? PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
What is Oral History?

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 15

What is Oral History? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 114 Views
  • Uploaded on

What is Oral History?. Harrison Prep Community and Service 2014. What Is Oral History?. Conversations about “ the old days ” among family members, neighbors, or coworkers. Captured and Printed stories that tell first hand accounts about past times and present experiences.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

What is Oral History?


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. What is Oral History? Harrison Prep Community and Service 2014

    2. What Is Oral History? • Conversations about “the old days” among family members, neighbors, or coworkers. • Captured and Printed stories that tell first hand accounts about past times and present experiences. • Recorded interviews with individuals deemed to have an important story to tell.

    3. What do I Use? • Audio- and videotape recorders. • Digital recording devices. • Human capacity for listening and writing! • Word programs to create a transcript. • i-movie to edit video • Garageband to create audio and video podcasts • i-photo to create books and publish photos. • Scanners to scan photos and documents. • Powerpoint to create multimedia presentations.

    4. How do I do it? • Oral history is, at its heart, a dialogue. • This “conversation” takes the form of an interview, in which one person—the interviewer—asks questions of another person—referred to as the interviewee or narrator. • The questions asked by the interviewer, should have a particular frame of reference or historical interest. • The responses from the narrator show the person’s sense of what is important or what he or she thinks is important to tell the interviewer. • The interviewer responds in turn and shapes the interviewer’s subsequent questions.

    5. What is my role? • There is no doubt that the single most important factor in the constitution of an interview is the questions posed by the interviewer. • You determine what is historically important, and your questions provide the direction and shape of the narrator’s story. • Good interviewers listen carefully and attempt to more closely align their questions with what the narrator thinks is important. • You need to ask what is important in their lives.

    6. What Questions Should I ask? • Where were you born? • How did you get here? • Where is your family from? • What did you do? - job • Why did you do it? • What was your favorite thing to do? • What do you think about what is different from when you were young and today?

    7. What Questions Should I ask? • What is your religion? • What kind of activities do you like? • What is your favorite thing to eat? • What are your hobbies? • Do you have any funny stories?

    8. What worked/didn’t • Trust • Engage • Knowledge -biography • What’s the point? • What do I really want to know? • Prepare – develop questions • Resistance

    9. What Questions Should I ask? Where have you lived? Do you have any family? – where do they live? What was your childhood like? – sensitive! What do you regret? Doing or Not doing? What made you happy? What did your parents do? – sensitive! What inspires you to do what you do!

    10. How is this going to work? • You will work in groups of 3-4, • Each person will have tasks to accomplish. • Your grade will be determined by your group. • You will be assigned a person to interview. • Your group will be responsible for researching: • Who they are • Where they lived • Developing a set of questions to ask the narrator. • Your group will determine which format you will publish your project (audio,video, ppt., etc)

    11. How is going to work 5. Your group will be responsible for working together to capture and publish a project. • All groups will produce a project to give to the narrator and publish to our school website. • Your project will be presented at HP on 6/17/11

    12. Production Schedule • 2/24 – Intro to Oral History • Determine Groups/Interviewee • Start Research on individual • Intro to production tools (computer clubhouse) • 4/7 – Interview Subjects • Research/Record • Start project • Transcribe interview • Scan pictures • Start editing

    13. Production Schedule • 4/28 – Finish Interviews • Research/Record • Start project • Transcribe interview • Scan pictures • Start editing • 5/17 – Work on Projects • Finish Research • Create Rough projects • Finish Transcribe interview • Finish Scan pictures • Finish editing/production

    14. Production Schedule • 5/17 – Work on Projects • Finish Research • Finish projects: • Finish Transcribe interview • Finish Scan pictures • Finish editing/production • Today is a work day, please work to complete your projects. No product no party!!! • We would like to have a thank you party/presentation for the participants on 6/17. We need volunteers to bring food/drink/napkins etc. - remember no homemade food! • We will be presenting our CSD project to the School in the afternoon on 6/17. Ian Cook will be heading up a group to take pictures of groups working, and to gather up written descriptions of your activity to share with the school.

    15. Production Schedule • 6/17 – Present Projects • Produce Finished projects • Publish Transcription of interviews • Produce Digitized volumes of catalogued pictures • Produce final presentations of people’s story