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ASSESSMENT IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION

ASSESSMENT IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION

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ASSESSMENT IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION

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  1. ASSESSMENT IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION What, When, How?

  2. Assessment or Evaluation? • Assess = “to sit beside” • Systematically gathering evidence from a variety of sources • Providing students with feedback for improvement (PE teachers are always assessing – why?)

  3. Evaluate = “judgement” • Judging quality of work based on established criteria • Assigning a value to represent that quality

  4. “The primary purpose of assessment and evaluation is to improve student learning” (Ontario Curriculum Grades 9 & 10 Program Planning and Assessment 1999)

  5. What is Unique About PE? • Immediate skill demonstration • Large number of students • Expectations are combined within and across strands • Assessment may be ongoing, multi-activity or single activity • Exceptional students may need a variety of alterations

  6. PE involves PERFORMANCE – Based Assessments • Development & execution • e.g. performing a specific skill according to given criteria • Process assessments • e.g. competitive game situation in which numerous decisions and changes in direction are made

  7. From the Curriculum to the Report Card – What is the Process? Step #1. Understanding the Curriculum Step #2. Collecting the evidence Step #3. Recording the evidence of student learning Step #4. Evaluating – making the judgement Step #5. Completing the Provincial Report Card

  8. Step #1. The Ontario Curriculum Curriculum Goal #1: Comprehension Curriculum Goal #2: Commitment Curriculum Goal #3: Capacity

  9. Goal #1: Comprehension “Students will develop an understanding of the importance of physical fitness, health and well-being and the factors that contribute to them.”

  10. Goal #2: Commitment “Students will develop a personal commitment to daily vigorous physical activity and personal health behaviours.”

  11. Goal #3: Capacity “Students will develop the basic movement skills they require to participate in physical activities throughout their lives.”

  12. STRANDS IN H & PE

  13. Active Participation • Physical Activity • Physical Fitness • Living Skills • Safety

  14. Fundamental Movement Skills • Locomotion • Manipulation • Stability (all integrating movement principles of relationships, space awareness, effort, body awareness)

  15. Healthy Living • Healthy Eating • Growth and Development • Personal Safety/Injury Prevention • Substance Use and Abuse

  16. Curriculum Expectations • Overall expectations • Specific expectations

  17. Achievement Levels Level 1 – below standard Level 2 – approaching standard Level 3 – Provincial standard Level 4 – achievement above standard

  18. Knowledge and Skills Categories • Understanding of Concepts • Movement Skills • Active Participation • Communication of Required Knowledge These categories develop learning tasks and assessment activities, inform parents of the focus of assessment, and identify the learning expectation as a “knowledge” or “skill”

  19. Step # 2: Collecting the Evidence • Sample Assessment strategies (what will students be doing?): • Skill demonstration (PERFORMANCE) • Game play (PERFORMANCE) • Journal, quiz, test • Case study, debate, discussion • Fitness profile/log, graphic organizer • Conference • Project, presentation • Role play • Portfolio, contract • Written or verbal response

  20. Step #2: Collecting the Evidence Sample assessment tools (what instrument will the teacher/student use to collect the evidence?): • Assessment scales (rubric) • Marking scheme • Target/wheel • Observation checklist

  21. Assessment Scale for Assessing Fundamental Movement Skills Specific Expectation: send an object to a partner….. Model: What does volleying look like? Level 1 – rarely performs Level 2 – sometimes performs Level 3 – usually performs Level 4 – consistently performs

  22. Designing Assessment Tasks • Focus on essential learnings (overall expectations), group specific expectations • Determine the knowledge/skill category for each by examining the verb • What evidence is required? – use a variety of assessment tasks to gather evidence • Provide students with clear targets, opportunities to meet expectations • Use Achievement level descriptors as a guide for gathering evidence

  23. Matching Assessment Tasks • Connect the learning expectations to the Knowledge/skills categories and the descriptors in the Achievement levels in “The Ontario Curriculum” (page 9) Expectations – content for learning Achievement Levels – how well the student has achieved the expectations

  24. Verbs Linked to Knowledge/Skills Categories • Understanding of concepts: identify, recognize, label, examine, outline, distinguish, define, analyze, relate, determine

  25. Verbs Linked to Knowledge/Skills Categories • Movement Skills: dribble, throw, kick, send, pass, balance, perform, dismount, jump, move, travel, bounce, demonstrate, combine, hit, stop, grip, hang, use

  26. Verbs Linked to Knowledge/Skills Categories • Communication of Required Knowledge: explain, describe, communicate, discuss, present, suggest

  27. Verb Linked to Knowledge/Skills Categories • Active Participation use, employ, apply, display, work, follow, demonstrate, stay, assess, participate, implement, improve, maintain, adopt, provide, acquire, incorporate, transfer, monitor

  28. STEP #3: Recording the Evidence • create a separate recording chart for each Knowledge/Skills category (e.g. Understanding of Concepts, Movement Skills, Active Participation, Communication of required knowledge) • OPHEA Documents provide lots of great samples!

  29. Recording of Evidence Chart Knowledge/Skills Category Level criteria Students names Expectations Topics/Units

  30. Step # 3 – continued… • Include descriptors (page 9) • Include expectations relating to that category • Indicate the topics/units where students have opportunities to demonstrate their learning, but REMEMBER…….

  31. Step # 3 continued…. • Some expectations may be demonstrated in a variety of units (e.g. locomotion) • Units or topics will relate to the program you develop (e.g. basketball, capture the flag, dodge ball, etc.) • Some expectations will require year long assessment (e.g. fair play, participation, etc.) • Some expectations will be most appropriately addressed in only one topic or unit (e.g. healthy eating)

  32. Step #3, continued… • Transfer the evidence from the assessment tools (rubrics, self, peer, teacher, etc.) to the recording charts • Record the appropriate Achievement level (1, 2, 3, 4)

  33. Step # 4: Evaluating… Making a Judgement • This involves determining the HIGHEST MOST CONSISTENT LEVEL of achievement • A weighting factor should be considered for each Knowledge/Skills category, taking into consideration QUANTITY, TIME, and QUALITY

  34. QUANTITY • Weighting based on the number of expectations assessed within each category (Active participation carries the most expectations at all elementary grade levels)

  35. TIME • Weighting based on the amount of time spent throughout the term/year for the student to demonstrate learning expectation(s).

  36. QUALITY • Weighting based on tasks that provide a richer indication of students’ ability.

  37. Step # 5: Completing the Provincial Report Card • Letter or percentage grade • Anecdotal comment describing the student’s strengths, weaknesses and steps for improvement • Report on learning skills

  38. The Provincial Report Cards • Elementary Report Card Grade 1-6 • Elementary Report Card Grade 7-8 • Secondary Report Card

  39. Learning Skills • Independent Work • Initiative E • Homework Completion • Use of information G • Cooperation with others • Conflict resolution S • Class participation • Problem solving N • Goal setting

  40. SECONDARY LEARNING SKILLS Subject:______________________Grade:__________Reporting Period:__________

  41. Entering the Grade • Translate the student’s highest most consistent level from your recording page • Translate that level into a letter or percentage grade • View process as moving from 4 point scale to 12 point scale

  42. Provincial Guide for Grading Level 4 A+ 90-100 A 85-89 A- 80-84 Level 3 B+ 77-79 B 73-76 B- 70-72 Level 2 C+ 67-69 C 63-66 C- 60-62 Level 1 D+ 57-59 D 53-56 D- 50-52 R (Below 50) R Below 50

  43. Anecdotal Comments • Describe the student’s strengths and weaknesses in relationship to the four Knowledge/skills categories • Describe the student’s achievement rather than simply listing the curriculum taught • Be clear, concise, and consistent with level of achievement • Describe the “next steps”, giving concrete suggestions for parent and student

  44. Source: Getting Assessment Right: Health and Physical Education Grades 1-8 By: Sue Amos and Susan Orchard Data Based Directions Quality Resources for Educators www.databdirect.com

  45. NOW YOU ARE READY…. TO ASSESS AND EVALUATE HEALTH AND PE!!!!! GOOD LUCK!