Using E-Learning and Multimedia to Develop Technical Skills - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Using E-Learning and Multimedia to Develop Technical Skills

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  1. Using E-Learning and Multimedia to Develop Technical Skills George Siemens Stephen Yurkiw

  2. Setting the Scene… • Drivers of change • New environment • Need to implement new approaches to meet needs • Integrating vocational and technology

  3. Terms • Vocational Education • Skill-based learning • Elearning • Technology-enabled learning • Vocational E-Learning • Skill-based Technology-enabled learning

  4. Goals of Education • Acquire tools for survival • Discover meaning • Learning to learn • More humane communities • Role in social reform/reconstruction • Not only to equip to contend with reform, but to initiate • Secure democracy Jerold Apps, Dewey, Lindeman, Bergevin

  5. Goals of Vocational Education • To prepare for gainful employment • Must be close to real world • Instructor must be successful practitioner • Curriculum must reflect content of occupation • Create skill set and attitudes needed to succeed in a particular field

  6. Change in “Teacher’s” Role • Due to focus of individual, social objectives and furthering of technical field, teacher is partner with learner • Teacher is helper, facilitator, guide, encourager • Student is not object of teaching, but focus of learning Bergevin, Lindeman

  7. Learning EcologyWhat do learners need to learn? • Content – text, videos, interactive activities, animations, etc. • Forums to connect with learners (i.e. replicate real life in career) • Mentorship – apprentice, instructor/chef • Access – education outside of a physical location • Flexibility – education that accounts for life

  8. Reducing Irrelevant Learning • Technical students have varying background and skills • ALL are at different points • Education needs to permit entry and access based on skill/experience • Requires complete system change, but the process can be mimicked online – i.e. student controls pace

  9. Stages of Knowing • Linking – association between concepts/knowledge • Reproducing – copying something as taught • Interpreting – using existing knowledge to recognize needs and guide actions/decisions in new situation • Applying – applying existing knowledge/skills to solve new problems Adapted from Broudy, Smith, Burnett

  10. How Can Technology Meet Vocational Education Goals? • Technology as a supplement, not replacement • Tech improves access & flexibility • Tech can communicate skills & theories • Tech – better “quality” assurance • F2F needed to develop social/industry awareness

  11. Elearning Overview • History • Drivers • Why is it changing learning? • How is it changing learning? • Scope and size

  12. CombiningTechnology & Classroom • Blended • Saves instruction time • Increases learning efficiency • Anxiety and intimidation in regular classroom minimized • Practice to proficiency • Variable learning rates

  13. Tools & Technologies • Streaming • Video • Audio – audio blogging, pronunciation, VoIP • Internet – LMS, blogging, “simple starts”, email, discussions • Software – development, delivery, collaborate • Simulations

  14. Examples • Dining Room Skills • Culinary Arts • Menu • Online Course

  15. Our Experiences • Culinary Arts • Hotel and Restaurant Administration • Teaching right way upfront • Unlimited repetitive feedback

  16. Results • Success indicators – no quantitative data yet • Initial anecdotal feedback • Better learning • Marks same as with traditional classes • Instructor Observations • Student Feedback

  17. Student Experiences • Student comments • Engaging • Fun way to learn • “I can learn when I want” - Flexibility • “I’m in control” • No instructor physically present – disorienting to some students

  18. Implications • Technology as a tool • Elearning meets needs of technical education – access, flexibility, quality • Theory, skills, relationships, mentorship – can all be taught/enhanced via elearning

  19. What is still needed • Administration support • Model for elearning development – skill based industry (plumbing etc.) • Tech advances – ability to stream confidently • Training instructors how to develop and use technology in teaching

  20. Conclusions • Change drivers are significant • New student/industry needs require new approaches • Continued vocational e-learning can: • Expand the field • Improve education • Result in higher student satisfaction • Greater organizational quality control