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Transformation to a Learning Paradigm University: Strategies, Implementation, and a Progress Report. Milt Cox, Ed Lambert, Jerry Sarquis, Karl Schilling, and Gregg Wentzell Center for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching

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transformation to a learning paradigm university strategies implementation and a progress report

Transformation to a Learning Paradigm University: Strategies, Implementation, and a Progress Report

Milt Cox, Ed Lambert, Jerry Sarquis, Karl Schilling, and Gregg Wentzell

Center for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching

Miami University

teaching without learning is just talking angelo cross 1993
Teaching

without learning

is just talking.

Angelo & Cross, 1993

the future of teaching

The Future of Teaching

focuses on the changing roles of students & faculty in a learning-centered environment

slide4

Transformation from the Instruction to the Learning Paradigm

4 FPLCs: Inclusive Classrooms and Campus (2); Advocating to Become the Learning Paradigm Institution; and Interdisciplinarity in Science

Top 25 Enrolled Courses Project

mission purpose
Instruction Paradigm

Provide/deliver instruction

Transfer knowledge from faculty to students

Improve quality of instruction

Achieve access for diverse students

Learning Paradigm

Produce learning

Elicit student discovery and construction of knowledge

Improve the quality of learning

Achieve success for diverse students

Mission & Purpose
criteria for success
Instruction Paradigm

Inputs, resources

Quality of entering students

Curriculum development, expansion

Quantity and quality of resources

Enrollment, revenue growth

Quality of faculty instruction

Learning Paradigm

Learning and student-success outcomes

Quality of exiting students

Learning technologies development, expansion

Quantity and quality of outcomes

Aggregate learning growth, efficiency

Quality of students, learning

Criteria for Success
teaching learning structures
Instruction Paradigm

Atomistic; parts prior to whole

Time held constant, learning varies

50-minute lecture, 3-unit course

Classes start/end at same time

One teacher, one classroom

Learning Paradigm

Holistic; whole prior to the parts

Learning held constant, time varies

Learning environments

Environment ready when student is

Whatever learning experience works

Teaching/Learning Structures
teaching learning structures1
Instruction Paradigm

Independent disciplines

Covering material

End-of-course assessment

Grading within classes by instructors

Private assessment

Degree equals accumulated credit hours

Learning Paradigm

Cross discipline/ department collaboration

Specified learning results

Pre-/during/post-assessments

External evaluations of learning

Public assessment

Degree equals demonstrated knowledge and skills

Teaching/Learning Structures
learning theory
Instruction Paradigm

Knowledge exists “out there”

Knowledge comes in “chunks” and “bits” delivered by instructors

Learning is cumulative and linear

Fits the storehouse of knowledge metaphor

Learning Paradigm

Knowledge exists in each person’s mind and is shaped by individual experience

Knowledge is constructed, created, and “gotten”

Learning is a nesting and interacting of frameworks

Fits learning how to ride a bicycle metaphor

Learning Theory
learning theory1
Instruction Paradigm

Learning is teacher centered and controlled

“live” teacher, “live” students required

The classroom and learning are competitive and individualistic

Talent and ability are rare

Learning Paradigm

Learning is student centered and controlled

“active” learner required, but not “live” teacher

Learning environment and learning are cooperative

Talent and ability are abundant

Learning Theory
productivity funding
Instruction Paradigm

Definition of productivity: cost per hour of instruction

Funding for hours of instruction

Learning Paradigm

Definition of productivity: cost per unit of learning per student

Funding for learning outcomes

Productivity/Funding
nature of roles
Instruction Paradigm

Faculty are primarily lecturers

Faculty and students act independently and in isolation

Teachers classify and sort students

Learning Paradigm

Faculty are primary designers of learning methods and environments

Faculty and students work in teams with each other and other staff

Teachers develop every student’s competencies and talents

Nature of Roles
nature of roles1
Instruction Paradigm

Staff serve/support faculty and the process of instruction

Any expert can teach

Line governance; independent actors

Learning Paradigm

All staff are educators who produce student learning and success

Empowering learning is challenging and complex

Shared governance; teamwork

Nature of Roles
maryellen weimer learner centered teaching 2002

Remember…Being learner-centered means focusing attention squarely on the learning process: what the student is learning, how the student is learning, the conditions under which the student is learning, whether the student is retaining and applying the learning, and how current learning positions the student for future learning.

Maryellen WeimerLearner-Centered Teaching (2002)

slide16

And about community . . .“. . . . One reason we deny meaningful communities to our students is that we, as college teachers, do not participate in them ourselves. At many institutions there is no living community of practice among faculty that is actively negotiating the meaning of teaching and participating in revising the tools they use . . . .”John Tagg pp. 262, 263