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Learning is not the product of teaching. Learning is the product of the activity of learners. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Learning is not the product of teaching. Learning is the product of the activity of learners.

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  1. Why Are We Here? Learning is not the product of teaching. Learning is the product of the activity of learners.

  2. College And Career Readiness: Connecting Aspire, Explore, Plan, and ACT Data to Classroom Instruction Kathy Allen Kristy Towns Keitha Segrest July 9, 2013 Etowah County Schools

  3. YOUR EXPECTATIONS On an index card, briefly explain what you hope to get out of today’s learning session?

  4. Outcomes Establish the meaning of effective teaching and learning using the Alabama College and Career Readiness Standards (AL CCRS) Understand the assessment standards from the Alabama Quality Teaching Standards (Standard 2:E) Demonstrate the relationship between Explore, Plan, ACT Interpret the scores earned in Explore and Plan Identify students’ strengths and weaknesses in order to plan effective, leveled instruction INDEPENDENT NEXT STEP Use the data for instructional planning to increase students’ college and career readiness

  5. TURN AND TALK Of all the things that are essential to good schools nothing is more important than the individual teacher and what that person brings to classroom instruction day to day... lesson to lesson... minute to minute... (from R.B.T. “At a Glance”)

  6. Remediation Data 2011

  7. Remediation Data 2012

  8. "The Green Bay Packers never lost a football game. They just ran out of time." -- Vince Lombardi

  9. Alabama State Department of Education’s Mission Statement Every student a graduate – Every graduate prepared for College/Work/Adulthood in the 21st Century

  10. Absolutes During Plan 2020 Transition Teach to the standards for each of the required subjects through a clearly articulated and locally aligned K-12 curriculum supported by aligned resources/support/professional development monitored regularly through formative/ interim/benchmark assessments to inform the effectiveness of the instruction and continued learning needs of individual and groups of students with a goal that each student graduates from high school with the knowledge and skills to succeed in post-high school education and the workforce without the need for remediation as evidenced by multiple measures achieved through multiple pathways to meet the graduation requirements set for students in Alabama.

  11. Absolute 1 1. Teach to the standards for each of the required subjects (Alabama College- and Career-Ready Standards - Courses of Study)

  12. Absolute 2 2. Through a clearly articulated and locally aligned K-12 curriculum (Sample curricula found on ALEX and Alabama Insight)

  13. Absolutes During the Transition Absolute 3 3. Supported by aligned resources, support, and professional development (Sample lesson plans and supporting resources found on ALEX, differentiated support through ALSDE Regional Support Teams and ALSDE Initiatives, etc.)

  14. Absolutes During the Transition Absolute 4 4. Monitored regularly through formative, interim/benchmark assessments to inform the effectiveness of the instruction and continued learning needs of individual and groups of students (GlobalScholar, QualityCore Benchmarks, and other locally determined assessments)

  15. Absolutes During the Transition Absolute 5 5. With a goal that each student graduates from high school with the knowledge and skills to succeed in post-high school education and the workforce without the need for remediation as evidenced by multiple measures achieved through multiple pathways to meet the graduation requirements set for students in Alabama. (Alabama High School Graduation Requirements/Diploma)

  16. Partner Brainstorm With a partner… brainstorm the characteristics of a prepared graduate. What are some things the prepared graduate should be able to do if they are literate?

  17. Prepared Graduate Defined Knowledge and Skills Possesses the ability to apply core academic skills to real-world situations through collaboration with peers in problem solving, precision, and punctuality in delivery of a product, and has a desire to be a life-long learner. Ability to Apply Learning Possesses the knowledge and skills needed to enroll and succeed in credit-bearing, first-year courses at a two or four year college, trade school, technical school, without the need for remediation.

  18. Demonstrates • independence • Understands other perspectives and cultures • Builds strong • content knowledge • Uses technology • and digital media strategically and capably • Responds to audience, task, purpose, and discipline • Values • Evidence • Comprehends as well as critiques

  19. What does Aspire, Explore, Plan, and ACT really assess? ANDWhat is required for college OR the workforce?LITERACY

  20. Reading is critical to building knowledge in history/social studies as well as in science and technical subjects. College and career ready reading in these fields requires an appreciation of the norms and conventions of each discipline, such as the kinds of evidence used in history and science; an understanding of domain-specific words and phrases; an attention to precise details; and the capacity to evaluate intricate arguments, synthesize complex information, and follow detailed descriptions of events and concepts. In history/social studies, for example, students need to be able to analyze, evaluate and differentiate primary and secondary sources….

  21. When reading scientific and technical texts, students need to be able to gain knowledge from challenging texts that often make extensive use of elaborate diagrams and data to convey information and illustrate concepts. Students must be able to read complex informational texts in these fields with independence and confidence because the vast majority of reading in college and workforce training programs will be sophisticated nonfiction. It is important to note that these reading standards are meant to complement the specific content demands of the disciplines, not replace them.

  22. For students, writing is a key means of asserting and defending claims, showing what they know about a subject, and conveying what they have experienced, imagined, thought, and felt. To be college- and career-ready writers, students must take task, purpose, and audience into careful consideration, choosing words, information, structures, and formats deliberately. They need to be able to use technology strategically when creating, refining, and collaborating on writing. They have to become adept at gathering information, evaluating sources, and citing material accurately, reporting findings from their research and analysis of sources in a clear and coherent manner.

  23. They must have the flexibility, concentration, and fluency to produce high-quality, first-draft text under a tight deadline and the capacity to revisit and make improvements to a piece of writing over multiple drafts when circumstances encourage or require it. To meet these goals, students must devote significant time and effort to writing, producing numerous pieces over short and long time frames throughout the year.

  24. The Old vs The New

  25. The Montebation of Traxalene Traxelene is native to North and South America. It was montebated by various North American cultures for many centuries before the arrival of Europeans. Traxalene is now produced primarily in the mid-western states. During the montebation process one ouliff of traxalene is placed in the montebation chamber with a small amount of orphene. The chamber is then closed and turned on. The montebation process is noisy and smelly. The process continues until the traxalene pours over the top of the chamber and the noise subsides. Hasmet and more orphene may be added to the traxalene at this time. How long has traxalene been used? Where is most traxalene currently produced?

  26. The Montebation of Traxalene Traxelene is native to North and South America. It was montebated by various North American cultures for many centuries before the arrival of Europeans. Traxalene is now produced primarily in the mid-western states. During the montebation process one ouliff of traxalene is placed in the montebation chamber with a small amount of orphene. The chamber is then closed and turned on. The montebation process is noisy and smelly. The process continues until the traxalene pours over the top of the chamber and the noise subsides. Hasmet and more orphene may be added to the traxalene at this time. Describe the montebation process. What is the signal that the process is complete? What substances are added to traxalene?

  27. NEW Based on evidence from the text, which culture most likely used traxalene first?

  28. So…. Can we identify high quality assessments and their impact on preparing students to be college and career ready? How do we know we can? What is our evidence? ARI Content Literacy 2013

  29. How does it ALL fit together? CIP Formative Assessment Professional Learning College and Career Ready Students EducateAlabama RTI

  30. Jigsaw Groups of 3 Read assigned indicators for assessment with your expert group and be ready to “teach” your home group.

  31. Formative Assessment “Formative assessment is a process used by teachers and students during instruction that provides feedback to adjust ongoing teaching and learning to improve students’ achievement of intended instructional outcomes.” (Definition by Council of Chief State School Officers, 2006, reported in Popham, 2008, p. 5)

  32. Formative Assessment is FOR learning While Summative Assessment is OF learning

  33. College Readiness Standards Help interpret what the scores earned on ASPIRE, EXPLORE , PLAN, ACT mean Identify the knowledge and skills students are likely to demonstrate at various score levels on the Explore test Serve as a direct link between what students have learned and what they are ready to learn next

  34. What is College Readiness? Level of student preparation needed to be ready to enroll and succeed without remediation in college-level, credit-bearing coursework

  35. College and Workforce Ready National research provides empirical evidence that the levels of readiness that high school graduates need to be prepared for college and workforce training are comparable. All students, therefore, should “experience a common academic program….regardless of their postgraduation plans.” College-Ready and Work-Ready: Same or Different? ACT 2006

  36. Rigorous Curriculum for ALL Students No matter where they are bound: Vocational or Technical Colleges Apprenticeships Community College, or 4-year College Directly into the workforce …a rigorous college preparatory curriculum gives students the best options for life after high school.

  37. CCRS – College And Career Readiness System • Aspire- 3th-8th • EXPLORE- 8th • PLAN- 10th • ACT- 11th • Assessment • Student Planning • Instructional Support • Evaluation

  38. Curriculum-based achievement test that measures college readiness Administered in the 8th grade Provides a baseline assessment of academic progress toward college and career readiness Facilitates early intervention in areas of academic need Useful in developing an effective high school coursework plan Can help predict performance on PLAN and state assessments

  39. Score Scales Relationship 40 36 32 35 30 25 25 20 English Math Reading Science English Math Reading Science English Math Reading Science Writing 15 10 5 0 EXPLORE 8th Grade PLAN 10th grade ACT 11th grade

  40. ACT’s College and Career Readiness System (CCRS) for ALSDE Administration Longitudinal Assessments • 11th Grade • English, math, reading, science, optional Writing Test • Career and Educational Components • Score Scale: 1—36 • 8th Grade • English, math, reading, science • Career and Educational Components • Score Scale: 1—25 • 10th Grade • English, math, reading, science • Career and Educational Components • Score Scale: 1—32 • 12th Grade • Job skills assessment system • Measures real-world skills • Measures 10 foundational workplace skills 2010-2011 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015

  41. College Readiness Benchmark Scores *The ACT Benchmark Score indicates a 50% chance of obtaining a “B” or a 75% chance of obtaining a “C” in corresponding credit-bearing college courses.

  42. AHA!!! *The ACT Benchmark Score indicates a 50% chance of obtaining a “B” or a 75% chance of obtaining a “C” in corresponding credit-bearing college courses.

  43. Student Score Report Review and Activity

  44. Student Score Reports • What do they tell you? • Academic strengths and weaknesses • Career and Postsecondary aspirations • College Readiness Indicators • Foundation of all aggregate reporting

  45. Student/School Information

  46. Range (1-25) Composite Score 15 What do Your Scores Mean?