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RIGOR AND RELEVANCE: From Buzz Words to Practice. Baldwin-Whitehall School District August 21, 2013. We are called to be pioneers . Pioneers who stand on the edge of great beginnings . Of unseen futures. Pioneers filled with the unwarranted confidence that visions give .

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rigor and relevance from buzz words to practice

RIGOR AND RELEVANCE:FromBuzzWords to Practice

Baldwin-Whitehall School District

August 21, 2013

slide2

We are called to bepioneers.

Pioneerswho stand on the edge of greatbeginnings.

Of unseen futures.

Pioneersfilledwith the unwarranted confidence that visions give.

Pioneerswhoseeyes and ears are elsewhere.

Whohear an echo of possibilities

As music poised to enter the universe.

Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, SJ

rigor
Rigor

Everybodyseems to beeitherpromisingit, demandingit, or deploring the lack of it

in American schools.

It’scertainly all the rage . . . But whatisit?

four myths about rigor
Four Myths about Rigor
  • Myth #1: Rigormeansdoing more.
  • Myth #2: Rigoris not for everyone.
  • Myth #3: Lots of homeworkis a sign of rigor.
  • Myth #4: Providing support islesseningrigor.

(Williamson and Blackburn, 2010)

seinfeld teaches history snl
Seinfeld Teaches History - SNL

http://cooperativelearning.nuvvo.com/lesson/9592-seinfeld-teaches-history

definition
Definition

”Rigor refers to learning in which students demonstrate a thorough, in-depth mastery of

challenging tasks to develop cognitive skills through reflective thought, analysis, problem-solving, evaluation, or creativity.”

(Daggett, 2009)

definition1
Definition

”’Rigor’ in the context of intellectualworkrefers to thoroughness, carefulness, and right understanding of the materialbeinglearned. Rigoris to academicworkwhatcareful practice and nuancedperformancedis to musical performance, and what intense and committed

definition cont d
Definition (cont’d)

playis to athletic performance. Whenwe talk about a ‘rigorous course’ in something, it’s a course that examines detail, insists on diligent and scrupulousstudy and performance, and doesn’tsettle for a mild or informal contact with the key ideas. ”

(Jenkins, Goldhorn and Webb, 2012)

definition2
Definition

”Rigoriscreating an environment in whicheachstudentisexpected to learnat high levels, eachissupportedsohe or shecanlearnat high levels, and eachstudentdemonstrateslearningat high levels. ”

(Blackburn, 2008)

slide13

Components of Rigor

  • Content acquisition
  • Critical thinking
  • Relevance
  • Integration
  • Application of concepts
  • Long term retention
  • Responsibility
slide14

Characteristics of a Rigorous Classroom

(by definition)

  • Eachstudentisexpected to learnat high levels
  • Eachstudentdemonstrateslearningat high levels
  • Eachstudentissupportedsothathe/shecanlearnat high levels
slide15

Teacher Expectations for Students to Learn at High Levels

  • The teacher’s verbiage, actions and body languageconsistentlyexude a beliefthateverystudent in the class possesses the potential to behis or her best, no matterwhat.
slide16

Teacher Expectations for Students to Learn at High Levels

  • Teachersaskintentional, higher-level questions.
  • Teachers do not acceptlow-levelresponsesfromstudents. Theyaskextending questions, provideappropriatewait time, continue to probe, and/or guide the student to a higherlevelanswerbeforemoving on to anotherstudent.
slide17

Teacher Expectations for Students to Learn at High Levels

  • Teachersspeak in the language of their content and expectstudents to do the same. Once again, the expectation for high-qualitystudentresponsesisreflected in the continualintentional use and acquisition/growth of vocabulary as modeled by the teacher and demonstrated by students.
slide18

Teacher Expectations for Students to Learn at High Levels

  • Planning and lesson design reflectsintentionalemphasis on Depth of Knowledge (DOK). Teachersunderstand and move studentsfromLevel 1 throughLevel 4 experiences, with consistent opportunities for StrategicThinking/Reasoning and Extended Thinking.
slide20

Bloom’s Taxonomy

  • The studentwillbe able to . . .

(insert verb) . . .

The VERBS weselected to writeour objectives were the EMPHASIS for lesson design and framedour goals for students.

slide21

Webb’s Depth of Knowledge (DOK)

  • The studentwillbe able to (select a verb) AND THEN . . .

COMPLETE THE LEARNING OBJECTIVE WITH EMPHASIS ON WHAT THE STUDENT WILL DO ON THE RIGOR CONTINUUM.

It’swhatcomes AFTER the verbthatmattersmost!!

slide22

Webb’s Depth of Knowledge

Example

  • DOK 1-Describe three characteristics of metamorphic rocks. (simple recall)
  • DOK 2-Describe the difference between metamorphic and igneous rocks. (requires cognitive processing to determine the differences in the two rock types)
  • DOK 3-Describe a model that you might use to represent the relationships that exist within the rock cycle. (requires a deep understanding of the rock cycle and a determination of how best to represent it)
slide23

So . . . Back to Teacher Expectations for Students to Learn at High Levels . . .

  • Planning and lesson design reflectsintentionalemphasis on Depth of Knowledge (DOK). Teachersunderstand and move studentsfromLevel 1 throughLevel 4 experiences, with consistent opportunities for StrategicThinking/Reasoning and Extended Thinking.
slide24

Characteristics of a Rigorous Classroom

(by definition)

  • Eachstudentisexpected to learnat high levels
  • Eachstudentdemonstrateslearningat high levels
  • Eachstudentissupportedsothathe/shecanlearnat high levels
slide25

Students Demonstrate Learning at High Levels

  • Studentsdemonstratetaskpersistence.
slide26

Students Demonstrate Learning at High Levels

  • Studentsexhibitsustained attention through active engagement.
slide27

Students Demonstrate Learning at High Levels

  • Students not onlyrespond to questions but regularly pose or create questions in response to and correlated to the learning.
slide28

Students Demonstrate Learning at High Levels

  • Studentsspeak in the language of their content.
slide29

Characteristics of a Rigorous Classroom

(by definition)

  • Eachstudentisexpected to learnat high levels
  • Eachstudentdemonstrateslearningat high levels
  • Eachstudentissupportedsothathe/shecanlearnat high levels
slide30

Teachers Support Students so that they can Learn at High Levels

  • Teachersprovideregular and specific feedback to students.
slide31

Teachers Support Students so that they can Learn at High Levels

  • Formative assessmentoccursregularly in the classroom, and the teacheradjusts and differentiates instruction based on the results.
slide32

Teachers Support Students so that they can Learn at High Levels

  • Scaffoldingisevident in lesson design and review/reinforcementappear as threads woventhroughout the lesson or a series of lessons.
slide33

Teachers Support Students so that they can Learn at High Levels

  • District-provided or teacher-made tools are regularlyused to support individuallearningdifferences.
relevance
Relevance
  • Relevance refers to learning in which students apply core knowledge, concepts, or skills to solve authentic problems. Relevant learning is interdisciplinary and contextual. Relevant learning is created, for example, through authentic projects or tasks, connecting concepts to current issues, performance tasks for authentic audiences, and teaching others.
rigor and relevance
Rigor and Relevance

One model:

  • Career Focus/Culminating Graduation Project (8-12)
  • Imbedding of Reading/Writing/Speaking/Presenting in every classroom (2-12)
  • Imbedding of Research Component (4-12)
  • Imbedding of Career Education & Work Standards (K-12)
  • Imbedding of Project Based Learning (5-12)
  • Immersion Experiences with Business Partners (9-12)