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Subordination by Adjective Clauses

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  1. Subordination by Adjective Clauses Lesson17 Joseph C. Blumenthal

  2. The adjective clause is useful in combing sentences when one sentence states an explanatory fact about a noun or pronoun in the previous sentence. Our yearbook comes out in June. It sells for one dollar. • The second sentence states and explanatory fact about the noun ______ in the first sentence.

  3. The adjective clause is useful in combing sentences when one sentence states an explanatory fact about a noun or pronoun in the previous sentence. Our yearbook comes out in June. It sells for one dollar. • The second sentence states and explanatory fact about the noun yearbook in the first sentence.

  4. Our yearbook comes out in June. It sells for one dollar. • Which word in the italicized sentence means the same thing as the noun yearbook in the first sentence? ___

  5. Our yearbook comes out in June. It sells for one dollar. • Which word in the italicized sentence means the same thing as the noun yearbook in the first sentence? _it_

  6. which Our yearbook comes out in June. It sells for one dollar. • To change the italicized sentence to an adjective clause, we put the relative pronoun ____ in place of It.

  7. which Our yearbook comes out in June. It sells for one dollar. • To change the italicized sentence to an adjective clause, we put the relative pronoun whichin place of It.

  8. which Our yearbook comes out in June. It sells for one dollar. • The clause which sells for one dollar should be inserted in the sentence right after the noun (yearbook, June), which it modifies.

  9. which Our yearbook comes out in June. It sells for one dollar. • The clause which sells for one dollar should be inserted in the sentence right after the noun (yearbook, June), which it modifies.

  10. Our yearbook, which sells for one dollar, comes out in June. • Our yearbook comes out in June, which sells for one dollar. • In which sentence is the adjective clause properly placed? (a, b)

  11. Our yearbook, which sells for one dollar, comes out in June. • Our yearbook comes out in June, which sells for one dollar. • In which sentence is the adjective clause properly placed? (a, b)

  12. Our yearbook comes out in June and sells for one dollar. • Our yearbook, which comes out in June, sells for one dollar. One sentence is compound; the other is complex. • The sentence that is complex because it contains a subordinate clause is (a, b).

  13. Our yearbook comes out in June and sells for one dollar. • Our yearbook, which comes out in June, which sells for one dollar. One sentence is compound; the other is complex. • The sentence that is complex because it contains a subordinate clause is (a, b).

  14. Our yearbook comes out in June, and it sells for one dollar. • Our yearbook, which comes out in June, sells for one dollar. • The two facts are brought into closer relationship by the (compound, complex) sentence.

  15. Our yearbook comes out in June, and it sells for one dollar. • Our yearbook, which comes out in June, sells for one dollar. • The two facts are brought into closer relationship by the (compound, complex) sentence.

  16. Our yearbook comes out in June, and it sells for one dollar. • By using a compound sentence we give (equal, unequal) emphasis to the two facts that the conjunction and connects.

  17. Our yearbook comes out in June, and it sells for one dollar. • By using a compound sentence we give (equal, unequal) emphasis to the two facts that the conjunction and connects.

  18. You have learned that to subordinate a fact or an idea means to put it into a word group that is (more, less) than a sentence.

  19. You have learned that to subordinate a fact or an idea means to put it into a word group that is (more, less) than a sentence.

  20. It sells for one dollar. • which sells for one dollar Both word groups state a fact about price. • The word group that subordinates the fact about price is the (clause, sentence).

  21. It sells for one dollar. • which sells for one dollar Both word groups state a fact about price. • The word group that subordinates the fact about price is the (clause, sentence).

  22. Our yearbook, which sells for one dollar, comes out in June. • Our yearbook comes out in June, and it sells for one dollar. • In which sentence is the price of the yearbook subordinated? (a, b)

  23. Our yearbook, which sells for one dollar, comes out in June. • Our yearbook comes out in June, and it sells for one dollar. • In which sentence is the price of the yearbook subordinated? (a, b)

  24. To subordinate a fact or idea is like taking an article from the front of a showcase and putting it in the back, where it is less conspicuous. • A fact or idea gets less emphasis when we put it in a (sentence, clause).

  25. To subordinate a fact or idea is like taking an article from the front of a showcase and putting it in the back, where it is less conspicuous. • A fact or idea gets less emphasis when we put it in a (sentence, clause).

  26. Our yearbook, which comes out in June, sells for one dollar. This complex sentence states two facts: one about price and another about time of issue. • This sentence gives greater emphasis to the fact about (price, time issue).

  27. Our yearbook, which comes out in June, sells for one dollar. This complex sentence states two facts: one about price and another about time of issue. • This sentence gives greater emphasis to the fact about (price, time issue).

  28. Our yearbook, which comes out in June, sells for one dollar. • Our yearbook, which sells for one dollar, comes out in June. • One sentence emphasizes the price; the other, the time of issue. Which emphasizes the time of issue? (a, b)

  29. Our yearbook, which comes out in June, sells for one dollar. • Our yearbook, which sells for one dollar, comes out in June. • One sentence emphasizes the price; the other, the time of issue. Which emphasizes the time of issue? (a, b)

  30. The type of sentence we use depends on the emphasis we wish to give various facts or ideas. • If we wish to give facts equal emphasis, we would use a (compound, complex) sentence.

  31. The type of sentence we use depends on the emphasis we wish to give various facts or ideas. • If we wish to give facts equal emphasis, we would use a (compound, complex) sentence.

  32. If we wish to subordinate one idea to another, we would use a (compound, complex) sentence.

  33. If we wish to subordinate one idea to another, we would use a (compound, complex) sentence.

  34. Now let’s look more closely into the process of subordinating an idea by changing it to an adjective clause. Tony read some notices. Few students heard them. • The italicized sentence provides information about the noun _____ in the first sentence.

  35. Now let’s look more closely into the process of subordinating an idea by changing it to an adjective clause. Tony read some notices. Few students heard them. • The italicized sentence provides information about the noun noticesin the first sentence.

  36. Tony read some notices. Few students heard them. • Which word in the italicized sentence means the same thing as notices in the first sentence? ____

  37. Tony read some notices. Few students heard them. • Which word in the italicized sentence means the same thing as notices in the first sentence? them

  38. which Tony read some notices. Few students heard them. • To change the italicized sentence to an adjective clause, we put the relative pronoun ____ in place of them.

  39. which Tony read some notices. Few students heard them. • To change the italicized sentence to an adjective clause, we put the relative pronoun whichin place of them.

  40. which Tony read some notices. Few students heard them. Tony read some notices, which few students heard. • Since a relative pronoun usually starts an adjective clause, we move which to the front of the clause, before the word ___.

  41. which Tony read some notices. Few students heard them. Tony read some notices, which few students heard. • Since a relative pronoun usually starts an adjective clause, we move which to the front of the clause, before the word few.

  42. Tony read some notices, which few students heard. • The adjective clause is in its proper position right after the word _____, which it modifies.

  43. Tony read some notices, which few students heard. • The adjective clause is in its proper position right after the word notices, which it modifies.

  44. Several of Don’s friends play college football. He went to high school with them. The pronoun them is the object of the preposition with. • Which clause signal should you put in place of them in changing the italicized sentence to an adjective clause: • which whose whom who

  45. Several of Don’s friends play college football. He went to high school with them. The pronoun them is the object of the preposition with. • Which clause signal should you put in place of them in changing the italicized sentence to an adjective clause: • which whose whom who

  46. Several of Don’s friends play college football. He went to high school with them. whom • We chose whom rather than who because it is the object of the preposition ___.

  47. Several of Don’s friends play college football. He went to high school withthem. whom • We chose whom rather than who because it is the object of the preposition with.

  48. Several of Don’s friends play college football. He went to high school with them. whom • After we move with whom to the front of the clause, we should insert it in the sentence after the word (friends, football), which it modifies.

  49. Several of Don’s friends play college football. He went to high school with them. whom • After we move with whom to the front of the clause, we should insert it in the sentence after the word (friends, football), which it modifies.

  50. Several of Don’s friends play college football with whom he went to high school. • Several of Don’s friends with whom he went to high school play college football. • In which sentence is the clause properly placed? • (a, b)