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Summarizing the Relationship Between Two Variables with Tables and a bit of a review. Chapters 6 and 7 Jan 31 and Feb 1, 2012. Looking at Tables . Tables are useful for examining the relationship between: variables measured at the nominal or ordinal level,

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summarizing the relationship between two variables with tables and a bit of a review

Summarizing the Relationship Between Two Variables with Tables and a bit of a review

Chapters 6 and 7

Jan 31 and Feb 1, 2012

looking at tables
Looking at Tables
  • Tables are useful for examining the relationship between:
    • variables measured at the nominal or ordinal level,
    • or variables measured at the interval or ratio level with a small number of discrete values.
some terminology and conventions
Some Terminology and Conventions
  • Two-way tables, Crosstabulations (Crosstabs)
  • Column (explanatory or independent)
  • Row (response or dependent)
  • Although the book does not always do this, there is a soft convention of stating a table title as “Dependent by Independent”. E.g. Table 2: Election Needed Now by Province.
slide4
Cells: As in a spread sheet a table is divided into cells aligned along rows and columns.
  • Marginal Distributions: These are the numbers that summarize the rows and the columns at the side and bottom of a table
  • Conditional Distributions: The book gives a very complicated explanation for what this is. In reality it is just the percentage of the cases in a cell or cells. This can be the percentage of cases along the horizontal row or the vertical column.
slide5

Here is an example of a Two Way table made with the “crosstab” procedure in SPSS (see my tip sheet for doing them in Excel). Question. Is there a difference between the number of bathrooms that homes in urban and rural Ontario have?

  • Look at row 1. Reading Across:

we see 94% of the homes with 1 bathroom are Urban 6% are Rural

  • Look at Column 1. Reading Down:

we see 52.2% of urban homes have 1 bath-room, 36.8% have 2 bathrooms 11.0% have three or more bathrooms.

slide6

The percentages give us a way to ‘eyeball’ the data and estimate if there is a difference, but to ask if these difference are meaningful, we must go further and calculate some statistics.

slide7
The Chi Sq. Test is a common one to use in a table with nominal variables such as this.
  • It measures the difference between the number of cases we expect to see in each cell and the number of cases we actually observe in each cell of our table.
  • The Chi Sq. value itself has little meaning for us. What matters is whether or not the value is significant. In this case it is > .05.
  • Therefore we reject the hypothesis that the results we see are meaningfully different from what we could expect through simple probability
  • Therefore we also reject that there is any meaningful difference between the number of bathrooms in urban and rural homes.
simpson s paradox that lurking variable thing again
Simpson’s ParadoxThat lurking variable thing again
  • Example 6.4 in your book gives you a look at a problem called Simpson’s Paradox.
  • An association or comparison that holds for all or several groups can reverse direction when the data are combined to form a single group (Moore pg. 169).
  • As Moore further notes, this is usually the sign of a “lurking” variable.
slide11
In order to check for lurking variables we can subdivide tables by a further categorical variable (such as was done in the book where the data was divided into serious and less serious accidents).
slide13
I would probably adjust this a bit.
  • In the final leg I would say:
    • If the Y (response or dependent) variable is quantitative (measured at the interval or ratio level) a regression line is a good summary.
    • However, if the Y (response or dependent) variable is ordinal or nominal, then a two way table is needed.
and again the general four step approaches to any statistical problem
And again the general four step approaches to any statistical problem
  • State: What is the practical question, in the context of the real world setting
  • Plan: What specific statistical operations does this problem call for
  • Solve: Make the graphs and carry out the calculations needed for this problem
  • Conclude: Give your practical conclusion in the setting of the real-world problem
also keep in mind
Also keep in mind…
  • I would also remind you that we looked at a couple of things the book did not cover, such as “spearman’s rho” as an alternative measure of correlation when working with a table in which both variables are ordinal and Chi Sq.