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DBQ Project for AP US History. Scott Hendricks Shaolin Master of US History Southern Nash High School. Basically, you will be presenting an OUTLINE of a DBQ. The goal is to help you to better understand the process of not just writing a DBQ, but writing a history essay in general.

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DBQ Project for AP US History


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    1. DBQ Project for AP US History Scott Hendricks Shaolin Master of US History Southern Nash High School

    2. Basically, you will be presenting an OUTLINE of a DBQ. • The goal is to help you to better understand the process of not just writing a DBQ, but writing a history essay in general.

    3. DBQ Project • Groups of 3 • Each group will be assigned a DBQ to • collaborate on. • Your group will be responsible for: • Completing a DBQ worksheet. • Preparing a Power point presentation on your • work. • This is basically illustrating your DBQ • worksheet.

    4. Should be “to the point” but aesthetically appealing. • Presenting it to class. • You will have 2 days in-class time to work on the DBQ. • Suggestion for division of work • Divide the worksheet and the Power point into three • parts. • You do not have to write the DBQ! • This is a TEST GRADE.

    5. Your outline will be the “DBQ Worksheet” that we use in class. Your Power point should follow it. One frame per section

    6. Student Example

    7. Question • With respect to the federal Constitution, the Jeffersonian Republicans are usually characterized as strict constructionists who were opposed to the broad constructionism of the Federalists. To what extent was this characterization of the two parties accurate during the presidencies of Jefferson and Madison? In writing your answer, use the documents and your knowledge of the period 1801-1817.

    8. Overview • Time period: 1800-1817 • Geographic regions: the U.S. • Era: presidencies of Jefferson and Madison • Key terms: Jeffersonian Republicans, Federalists, Strict Constructionists, and Broad Constructionism

    9. Document A • Thomas Jefferson is writing to Gideon Granger • States should be given powers not granted to the federal government in the Constitution • States should govern themselves • Federal government’s power should be limited to the powers delegated to it by the Constitution • This is a strict interpretation of the Constitution

    10. Document B • Thomas Jefferson is writing to Samuel Miller • He supports religious freedom • The federal government should not be able to tell the people what religion to be a part of • This supports the strict interpretation

    11. Document C • Alexander Anderson’s cartoon • Protests Jefferson’s embargo act • “OGRABME” is embargo spelled backwards • Depicts merchants dodging the “Ograbme” • People, especially merchants hated the embargo

    12. Document D • Daniel Webster is making a speech to the House of Representatives • He is arguing against the Madison administration • Argues that drafting children into the army is unconstitutional • It separates the family • Madison is not following a strict interpretation by drafting

    13. Document E • Report and Resolutions of the Hartford Convention • Resolved-the amendments should be recommended to the states to be approved by the officials that the people elected • Second-there must be a vote of two-thirds from both the Senate and the House of Representatives for a new state to be admitted

    14. Document E cont’d • Third-Embargos that Congress issues on the ships/vessels of the citizens shall not last longer than sixty days • Fourth-unless Congress has two-thirds vote, they cannot interdict the commercial intercourse between the U.S. and foreign nations • These proposals are in keeping with the strict interpretation of the Constitution

    15. Document F • John Randolph is making a speech to the House of Representatives • He argues that the federal government is only appearing to have republican values • To support this argument, he states that the tariffs are put in place for revenue, not for the good of the people

    16. Document G • Thomas Jefferson is writing to Samuel Kercheval • He does not like frequent changes to the Constitution, but he knows that at certain points, the laws must be changed • He feels that they should be changed based on the progress of human minds (new discoveries, new truths disclosed, manners and opinions change) • This opinion does not follow a strict interpretation

    17. Document H • James Madison’s message to Congress vetoing an Internal Improvements Bill • He is against the internal improvements • He declares that they are unconstitutional since the power to implement roads, canals, etc. is not given to the federal government by the Constitution • His veto of the bill supports a strict interpretation of the Constitution

    18. Outside Information • Jeffersonian Republicans-strict interpretation • Jefferson and Madison-Jeffersonian Republicans • Jefferson- bookish theories ≠ practical politics

    19. Outside Information cont’d • Madison did support strict views by vetoing the internal improvements bill • Internal improvements were believed to = improve commerce and unity

    20. Outside Information cont’d • Jefferson made the Louisiana Purchase-went against his beliefs (Napoleon offered the entire Louisiana Territory for $15 million) • Tariffs

    21. Outside Information cont’d • Embargo Act of 1807-neutrality • Impressments • The Embargo harmed the economy

    22. Introduction/Thesis Statement The time period from 1800 to 1817 included a two party system consisting of Federalists and Jeffersonian Republicans. The Federalists were believed to be broad constructionists, whereas the Republicans were believed to be strict constructionists. Both of these parties had to sometimes venture past their beliefs to appeal to the nation as a whole, rather than appealing only to their party. During the presidencies of Jefferson and Madison, the characterization of the Jeffersonian Republicans was only partially accurate. They did veto a bill dealing with internal improvements; however, they supported tariffs. The Jeffersonian Republicans also made the Louisiana Purchase and imposed an embargo, going against their own beliefs.

    23. Paragraph 1 • The vetoing of a bill dealing with internal improvements allowed the characterization of Jeffersonian Republicans to be accurate at times. • Madison did support strict views by vetoing the internal improvements bill • Internal improvements were believed to = improve commerce and unity

    24. Paragraph 1 cont’d • Document H- President Madison vetoed the bill on internal improvements since the Constitution did not give him the power to impose them.

    25. Paragraph 2 • The Jeffersonian Republicans often leaned toward a Federalist view, such as when they imposed tariffs and made the Louisiana Purchase. • Tariffs • Document F- The tariffs are in keeping with Federalist views, not Jeffersonian Republican views.

    26. Paragraph 2 cont’d • Jefferson made the Louisiana Purchase-went against his beliefs (Napoleon offered the entire Louisiana Territory for $15 million) • Document G- Since the population and economy was growing, more land had to be purchased for further expansion.

    27. Paragraph 3 • Finally, to totally negate the characterization of Jeffersonian Republicans as strict constructionists, they enforced the Embargo Act of 1807. • Embargo Act of 1807-neutrality • Impressments • The Embargo harmed the economy

    28. Paragraph 3 cont’d • Document C- It is not stated in the Constitution that the government can enforce an embargo.

    29. Example #2

    30. Question • Although New England and the Chesapeake region were both settled largely by people of English origin, by 1700 the regions had evolved into two distinct societies. Why did this difference in development occur?

    31. Overview • Time Periods: Up to 1700 • Regions: New England and Chesapeake

    32. Document A • In 1630, John Winthrop felt that his community should be a Puritan society that would serve as an example for others. • “We must consider that we shall be as a city upon a hill.”

    33. Document B • A list of emigrants bound for New England was released on March 20, 1635 by John Porter, Deputy Clerk to Edward Thoroughgood.

    34. Document C • In July, 1635 a list of underwritten names to be transported to Virginia was released. • The people on this list had taken oaths of allegiance to the Church of England.

    35. Document D • 1636 the Articles of Agreement were signed in Springfield, Massachusetts. The goal was to create a Christian society without discrimination between rich and poor.

    36. Document E • In 1676, the Wage and Price Regulations were approved in Connecticut. It set a regular pay for the work.

    37. Document F • In 1624, John Smith wrote about hardships that colonists faced in Virginia while looking for gold that was not there.

    38. Document G • Governor Berkely wrote about the defense of Virginia against a possible Dutch attack.

    39. Document H • Bacon protested the current relationship with Native Americans in the Virginia region. He also felt that the poor were being treated unequally in comparison to the rich Virginians.

    40. Outside Information • New England was a distinct Puritan society while the Chesapeake region was not. • The Chesapeake region relied on tobacco. • The Chesapeake region was made up of isolated farms and plantations • Few big cities sprouted in the Chesapeake region. • Families were at the center of New England society.

    41. Outside Information (Cont.) • There was a population boom in New England. • The basis of New England society were small villages. • Chesapeake was more concerned with gaining land and rights. • Bacon’s Rebellion • Defined hierarchy in the Chesapeake region.

    42. Outside Information (Cont.) • An urban profession including lawyers and financer’s were slow to emerge. • New England had less ethnic variety. • Slavery was attempted but could not exist profitably. • New England economy relied more on the sea.

    43. Thesis Statement • The New England and Chesapeake region evolved into two distinct societies because of differences in philosophical backgrounds, geography, and population density.

    44. Paragraph 1 Topic Sentence • The Chesapeake and New England region were base on different philosophies and goals.

    45. Paragraph 1 Outside Information • New England was a Puritan society • Religion was not as popular in the Chesapeake region. • There was a distinct social hierarchy in the Chesapeake. • Emigrants to the Chesapeake region were more focused on gaining wealth.

    46. Paragraph 1 Documents • Document A – Shows New England’s devotion to religious principles. • Document D – Shows that the goal of New England society was creation of a society without discrimination. • Document F- The struggle of Chesapeake colonists to find gold shows the importance of wealth in their society.

    47. Paragraph 2 Topic Sentence • The geographical differences between the Chesapeake and New England region helped to differentiate the regions.

    48. Paragraph 2 Outside Information • The Chesapeake region had better land for farming and relied on tobacco. • The Chesapeake region was an agricultural society. • The New England region had less land for farming and became a society built around its urban businesses and its dependence on the sea.

    49. Paragraph 2 Documents • Document F – shows the isolation and hardships that resulted from the geography of the Chesapeake region.