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Unit 3-2 Exam Questions. Directions. Click the indicated icon to begin the slide show Press the right arrow key on the keyboard once to reveal the answer Press the right arrow key once more to advance to the next question. Table of Contents. Robber Barons Capitalism Laissez Faire

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directions
Directions
  • Click the indicated icon to begin the slide show
  • Press the right arrow key on the keyboard once to reveal the answer
  • Press the right arrow key once more to advance to the next question
table of contents
Table of Contents
  • Robber Barons
  • Capitalism
  • Laissez Faire
  • Sherman Antitrust Act
  • Wabash, St. Louis, & Pacific Railway Company v. Illinois (1886)
  • Monopolies / Trusts
  • Standard Oil
  • Gilded Age
  • Labor Unions
  • Strikes
  • Granger Movement
  • Populists
  • Gold Standard
  • Interstate Commerce Act
  • Social Darwinism
  • Assembly Line
  • Socialism
robber barons
Robber Barons

In the late 1800s, the term robber baron was used

to describe some owners of big businesses

primarily because they

(1) favored free trade

(2) eliminated competition using ruthless methods

(3) opposed the formation of corporations

(4) provided workers with high wages

robber barons1
Robber Barons

During the late 1800s and early 1900s, the term

robber baron best defined a person who

(1) controlled large tracts of western lands

(2) used ruthless business tactics

(3) stole from the rich to give to the poor

(4) encouraged the conservation of raw materials

robber barons2
Robber Barons

Business leaders John D. Rockefeller, J. P.

Morgan, and Cornelius Vanderbilt were referred

to as robber barons primarily because they

(1) bought titles of nobility from foreign

governments

(2) were ruthless in dealing with competitors

(3) stole money from state and local governments

(4) gained all of their wealth by illegal means

robber barons3
Robber Barons

The term robber baron was used to criticize the

(1) tactics of big-business leaders

(2) corruption of government officials

(3) dishonesty of carpetbaggers

(4) unskilled labor of illegal immigrants

robber barons4
Robber Barons

Speaker A: “When demand ran high, and markets

were scarce, he showed little mercy, broke his contracts for delivery and raised prices.”

Speaker B: “The man of wealth must hold his

fortune ‘in trust’ for the community and use it for philanthropic and charitable purposes.”

Speaker C: “It is cruel to slander the rich because

they have been successful. They have gone into great enterprises that have enriched the nation and the nation has enriched them.”

Speaker D: “The fruits of the toil of millions are

boldly stolen to build up colossal fortunes for the few, unprecedented in the history of mankind.”

Which two speakers would most likely label late 19th-century industrialists as robber barons?

(1) A and B

(2) A and D

(3) B and C

(4) C and D

capitalism
Capitalism

During the late 1800s, the defenders of Social

Darwinism would most likely have supported

(1) labor unions

(2) progressive income taxes

(3) laissez-faire capitalism

(4) environmental conservation

capitalism1
Capitalism

In the late 1800s, supporters of laissez-faire

capitalism claimed that government regulation of

business would be

(1) essential to protect the rights of consumers

(2) necessary to provide jobs for the unemployed

(3) useful in competing with foreign nations

(4) harmful to economic growth

laissez faire
Laissez-faire

Which heading best completes the partial outline below?

(1) Social Reforms

(2) Constitutional Amendments

(3) Economic Policies

(4) Religious Beliefs

laissez faire1
Laissez-faire

Which economic policy argues that government

should limit, as much as possible, any

interference in the economy?

  • socialism

(2) laissez-faire

(3) mercantilism

(4) protectionism

laissez faire2
Laissez-faire

In the late 1800s, the principles of Social

Darwinism were most consistent with the ideas of

(1) Populism

(2) laissez-faire economics

(3) trustbusting

(4) utopian socialism

sherman antitrust act
Sherman Antitrust Act

The Sherman Antitrust Act and the Clayton

Antitrust Act were passed in an effort to

(1) promote the formation of new trusts

(2) maintain competition in business

(3) increase business investment

(4) limit the activities of foreign corporations

sherman antitrust act1
Sherman Antitrust Act

The Interstate Commerce Act (1887), the

Sherman Antitrust Act (1890), and the Clayton

Antitrust Act (1914) are similar in that they were

intended to

(1) reaffirm the federal government’s laissezfaire

attitude toward big business

(2) increase the federal government’s power to

regulate business practices

(3) authorize the breakup of labor unions

(4) reject the use of trustbusting

sherman antitrust act2
Sherman Antitrust Act

In passing the Sherman Antitrust Act (1890),

Congress intended to

(1) prevent large corporations from eliminating

their competition

(2) distinguish good trusts from bad trusts

(3) regulate rates charged by railroads

(4) force large trusts to bargain with labor unions

sherman antitrust act3
Sherman Antitrust Act

The Interstate Commerce Act (1887) and the

Sherman Antitrust Act (1890) were efforts by the

federal government to

(1) regulate some aspects of business

(2) expand the positive features of the trusts

(3) favor big business over small companies

(4) move toward government ownership of key

industries

sherman antitrust act4
Sherman Antitrust Act

In the late 19th century, Congress tried to limit

the power of monopolies by

(1) creating the Federal Trade Commission

(2) strengthening the Supreme Court

(3) adopting Granger laws

(4) passing the Sherman Antitrust Act

sherman antitrust act5
Sherman Antitrust Act

During the early 1890s, the federal government dealt with situations like the one shown in the cartoon by

(1) raising tariff rates on imported oil

(2) providing economic aid for small businesses

(3) prosecuting businessmen for graft and corruption

(4) passing the Sherman Antitrust Act

sherman antitrust act6
Sherman Antitrust Act

The Interstate Commerce Act and the Sherman

Antitrust Act were attempts by Congress to

(1) regulate the activities of big business

(2) protect consumers against unsafe products

(3) impose government regulations on agricultural

production

(4) bring transportation activities under government

ownership

sherman antitrust act7
Sherman Antitrust Act

Both the Interstate Commerce Act and the

Sherman Antitrust Act were

(1) inspired by the effectiveness of earlier state laws

(2) designed to protect business from foreign

competition

(3) declared unconstitutional by the Supreme

Court in the late 1800s

(4) passed by the federal government to regulate

big business

wabash st louis pacific railway company v illinois 1886
Wabash, St. Louis, & Pacific Railway Company v. Illinois (1886)

The decision in Gibbons v. Ogden (1824) and the decision in Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific Railroad v. Illinois (1886) addressed the issue of

(1) congressional privileges

(2) regulation of interstate commerce

(3) state taxation of federal property

(4) contract rights

wabash st louis pacific railway company v illinois 18861
Wabash, St. Louis, & Pacific Railway Company v. Illinois (1886)

The Supreme Court cases of Wabash, St. Louis &

Pacific R.R. v. Illinois (1886) and United States v.

E. C. Knight Co. (1895) were based on laws that

were intended to

(1) limit the power of big business

(2) support farmers’ efforts to increase the

money supply

(3) maintain a laissez-faire approach to the

economy

(4) improve working conditions for immigrants

monopolies trusts
Monopolies / Trusts

Many of the business trusts created in the late

1800s were eventually declared illegal primarily

because they

(1) eliminated competition by forming monopolies

(2) combined companies that manufactured different

products

(3) donated large sums of money to political

candidates

(4) allowed children to work under unsafe

conditions

monopolies trusts1
Monopolies / Trusts

In the late 19th century, critics of big business

claimed that monopolies most harmed the

economy by

(1) limiting competition

(2) decreasing the urban growth rate

(3) preventing technological innovation

(4) failing to keep pace with European industries

monopolies trusts2
Monopolies / Trusts

The theory of Social Darwinism was often used to justify the

(1) creation of the Ku Klux Klan

(2) formation of business monopolies

(3) use of strikes by labor unions

(4) passage of antitrust laws

monopolies trusts3
Monopolies / Trusts

Which type of business organization is being

criticized in this cartoon?

(1) monopoly

(2) multinational corporation

(3) partnership

(4) proprietorship

monopolies trusts4
Monopolies / Trusts

Which government policy would this cartoonist most likely support?

(1) adopting antitrust laws

(2) easing regulations regarding mergers

(3) giving government subsidies to financial

institutions

(4) encouraging large companies to relocate

overseas

monopolies trusts5
Monopolies / Trusts

Which economic concept is best illustrated by the cartoon?

  • supply and demand

(2) mercantilism

(3) monopoly

(4) trade

monopolies trusts6
Monopolies / Trusts

In the late 19th century, Congress tried to limit

the power of monopolies by

(1) creating the Federal Trade Commission

(2) strengthening the Supreme Court

(3) adopting Granger laws

(4) passing the Sherman Antitrust Act

monopolies trusts7
Monopolies / Trusts

During the 20th century, federal prosecutions of

corporations such as Standard Oil, AT&T, and

Microsoft were based on alleged violations of

(1) stock market practices

(2) environmental regulations

(3) labor union protections

(4) antitrust laws

monopolies trusts8
Monopolies / Trusts

What is the main idea of the cartoon?

(1) Government policies have created a recession.

(2) Americans support the activities of trusts.

(3) Good government has saved the country from trusts.

(4) Trusts are a threat to the nation.

monopolies trusts9
Monopolies / Trusts

Which group would most likely have favored government action to address the issue shown in the cartoon?

(1) bankers

(2) unions

(3) industrialists

(4) railroad owners

monopolies trusts10
Monopolies / Trusts

What is the main idea of this cartoon from the 1800s?

(1) Labor is gaining power over big business.

(2) Most Americans support the labor movement.

(3) Business has advantages over labor.

(4) Government should support the expansion of railroads.

monopolies trusts11
Monopolies / Trusts

The American Federation of Labor responded to the situation shown in the cartoon by

(1) organizing skilled workers into unions

(2) encouraging open immigration

(3) forming worker-owned businesses

(4) creating a single union of workers and farmers

monopolies trusts12
Monopolies / Trusts

“…In other words, our demand is that big business give the people a square deal and that the people give a square deal to any man engaged in big business who honestly endeavors to do what is right and proper.…”

— Theodore Roosevelt, “A Charter for Democracy,”

February 21, 1912

This statement reflects President Theodore Roosevelt’s position that the federal government should

(1) leave regulation of big business to the states

(2) cease regulation of business activities

(3) regulate abusive business practices

(4) seize control of all trusts

monopolies trusts13
Monopolies / Trusts

Many of the business trusts created in the late 1800s were eventually declared illegal primarily because they

(1) eliminated competition by forming monopolies

(2) combined companies that manufactured different products

(3) donated large sums of money to political candidates

(4) allowed children to work under unsafe conditions

monopolies trusts14
Monopolies / Trusts

During the late 1800s, pools and trusts were used by big business in an effort to

(1) increase imports

(2) limit competition

(3) improve working conditions

(4) reduce corporate income taxes

monopolies trusts15
Monopolies / Trusts

This cartoonist is expressing

(1) support for new tariffs

(2) encouragement for increased immigration

(3) concern for environmental pollution

(4) dissatisfaction with the power of big business

monopolies trusts16
Monopolies / Trusts

In the late 1800s, the creation of the Standard Oil

Trust by John D. Rockefeller was intended to

(1) protect small, independent oil firms

(2) control prices and practices in the oil refining

business

(3) increase competition among oil refining

companies

(4) distribute donations to charitable causes

monopolies trusts17
Monopolies / Trusts

The federal government enforced the antitrust

laws in court cases against Northern Securities

Company, AT&T, and Microsoft in an effort to

(1) increase business competition

(2) nationalize important industries

(3) improve public trust in corporate leaders

(4) generate more investment capital

standard oil
Standard Oil

Lincoln Steffens’s The Shame of the Cities and

Ida Tarbell’s The History of the Standard Oil

Company are examples of the use of

(1) the Gospel of Wealth

(2) the melting pot theory

(3) Social Darwinism

(4) muckraking

standard oil1
Standard Oil

The principal message of the cartoon is that the Standard Oil Company

(1) used its size to lower the prices of its products

(2) protected the nation from foreign competition

(3) used its economic power to influence government decisions

(4) employed violence to gain an unfair advantage for its workers

standard oil2
Standard Oil

In the late 1800s, the creation of the Standard Oil

Trust by John D. Rockefeller was intended to

(1) protect small, independent oil firms

(2) control prices and practices in the oil refining

business

(3) increase competition among oil refining

companies

(4) distribute donations to charitable causes

standard oil3
Standard Oil

Which type of business organization is being

criticized in this cartoon?

(1) monopoly

(2) multinational corporation

(3) partnership

(4) proprietorship

standard oil4
Standard Oil

Which government policy would this cartoonist most likely support?

(1) adopting antitrust laws

(2) easing regulations regarding mergers

(3) giving government subsidies to financial

institutions

(4) encouraging large companies to relocate

overseas

standard oil5
Standard Oil

Which economic concept is best illustrated by the cartoon?

  • supply and demand

(2) mercantilism

(3) monopoly

(4) trade

standard oil6
Standard Oil

During the 20th century, federal prosecutions of

corporations such as Standard Oil, AT&T, and

Microsoft were based on alleged violations of

(1) stock market practices

(2) environmental regulations

(3) labor union protections

(4) antitrust laws

gilded age
Gilded Age

Mark Twain labeled the late 1800s in the United

States the “Gilded Age” to describe the

(1) end of the practice of slavery

(2) absence of international conflicts

(3) extremes of wealth and poverty

(4) achievements of the labor movement

labor unions
Labor Unions

During the late 1800s, which development led to

the other three?

(1) formation of labor unions

(2) increased demand for natural resources

(3) federal regulation of business trusts

(4) growth of industry

labor unions1
Labor Unions

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, a major goal of the American Federation of Labor (AFL) was to

(1) end restrictions on child labor

(2) admit women to the industrial workforce

(3) improve wages and working conditions

(4) join all workers into a single union

labor unions2
Labor Unions

The formation of national labor unions in the late

1800s was mainly a response to

(1) passage of federal laws that favored workers

(2) laws restricting immigration and naturalization

(3) poor working conditions and low wages in

many industries

(4) economic depressions that had led to high

unemployment

labor unions3
Labor Unions

The American Federation of Labor’s support for

“bread and butter” unionism was intended to

(1) gain control of state and federal legislatures

(2) change the economic system to socialism

(3) combine all skilled and unskilled workers into

one large organization

(4) improve wages, hours, and working conditions

labor unions4
Labor Unions

Which action did Cesar Chavez take that is most consistent with the theme of this excerpt?

(1) organizing a farmworkers union

(2) calling for stricter enforcement of immigration laws

(3) asking Congress to pass legislation for low incomehousing

(4) promoting the takeover of large corporations by farmworkers

Dear Mr. Barr,

… This letter does not express all that is in my

heart, Mr. Barr. But if it says nothing else it says

that we do not hate you or rejoice to see your

industry destroyed; we hate the agribusiness

system [agricultural corporations] that seeks to

keep us enslaved and we shall overcome and

change it not by retaliation or bloodshed but by a determined nonviolent struggle carried on by

those masses of farm workers who intend to be

free and human.

Sincerely yours,

Cesar E. Chavez

— Cesar Chavez, letter to E.L. Barr Jr.,

Good Friday, 1969, in Andrew Carroll, ed.,

Letters of a Nation, Broadway Books

labor unions5
Labor Unions

We mean to make things over,

we are tired of toil for naught,

With but bare enough to live upon,

and never an hour for thought;

We want to feel the sunshine,

and we want to smell the flowers,

We are sure that God has will’d it,

and we mean to have eight hours.

We’re summoning our forces

from the shipyard, shop and mill,

Chorus.

Eight hours for work, eight hours for rest,

eight hours for what we will!

Eight hours for work, eight hours for rest,

eight hours for what we will!

— I.G. Blanchard, “Eight Hours,” 1878

During the late 1800s, the ideas expressed in these lyrics were the goals of

(1) organizers of labor unions

(2) sharecroppers following the Civil War

(3) Grangers demanding railroad regulation

(4) owners of big businesses

labor unions6
Labor Unions

In the black of the winter of nineteen nine,

When we froze and bled on the picket line,

We showed the world that women could fight

And we rose and won with women’s might.

Chorus:

Hail the waistmakers of nineteen nine,

Making their stand on the picket line,

Breaking the power of those who reign,

Pointing the way, smashing the chain.

And we gave new courage to the men

Who carried on in nineteen ten

And shoulder to shoulder we’ll win through,

Led by the I.L.G.W.U.

— Let’s Sing!, Educational Department, International

Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union, New York City

Which type of labor-related action is best described in this song?

(1) a strike

(2) an open shop

(3) a boycott

(4) an injunction

labor unions7
Labor Unions

The Anthracite Coal Strike (1902), the Wagner

Act (1935), and the founding of the United Farm

Workers (1962) were important steps in

(1) limiting the growth of labor unions

(2) creating greater equality for women

(3) ending discrimination directed at African

Americans in the South

(4) promoting fair labor practices and collective

bargaining for workers

labor unions8
Labor Unions

The National Labor Relations Act of 1935

(Wagner Act) affected workers by

(1) protecting their right to form unions and

bargain collectively

(2) preventing public employee unions from

going on strike

(3) providing federal pensions for retired workers

(4) forbidding racial discrimination in employment

labor unions9
Labor Unions

Samuel Gompers, Eugene V. Debs, and John L.

Lewis all influenced the American economy by

(1) supporting free trade between nations

(2) encouraging the use of monopolies

(3) advocating laissez-faire capitalism

(4) working to build unions and improve pay

labor unions10
Labor Unions

During the late 1800s, what was the main reason

labor unions had difficulty achieving gains for

workers?

(1) Communists had taken control of the major

unions.

(2) The government supported business efforts

to limit the powers of unions.

(3) Most unions had been organized by big

business.

(4) Most workers were satisfied with working

conditions.

labor unions11
Labor Unions

Which group would most likely have favored government action to address the issue shown in the cartoon?

(1) bankers

(2) unions

(3) industrialists

(4) railroad owners

labor unions12
Labor Unions

In a United States history textbook, the terms

bread and butter unionism, Gospel of Wealth, and

mechanization would most likely be found in a

chapter entitled

(1) Reconstruction (1865–1877)

(2) Industrialization (1870–1900)

(3) Imperialism (1898–1905)

(4) The Roaring Twenties (1920–1929)

labor unions13
Labor Unions

During the late 19th century, which practices

were used by employers against workers?

(1) boycotts and lockouts

(2) picketing and walkouts

(3) blacklists and yellow-dog contracts

(4) mass rallies and sit-down strikes

labor unions14
Labor Unions

The United States adopted the immigration policies shown in the chart mainly because of

(1) pressures from nativists and labor unions

(2) hardships caused by the Great Depression

(3) prejudices generated during World War II

(4) threats from other nations to stop migration to the United States

labor unions15
Labor Unions

What is the main idea of this cartoon from the 1800s?

(1) Labor is gaining power over big business.

(2) Most Americans support the labor movement.

(3) Business has advantages over labor.

(4) Government should support the expansion of railroads.

labor unions16
Labor Unions

The American Federation of Labor responded to the situation shown in the cartoon by

(1) organizing skilled workers into unions

(2) encouraging open immigration

(3) forming worker-owned businesses

(4) creating a single union of workers and farmers

strikes
Strikes

During the late 1800s, presidents and governors most often used military force during labor managementconflicts as a way to

(1) support industrialists and end strikes

(2) make employers sign collective bargaining

agreements

(3) protect workers from the private armies of

employers

(4) replace striking factory workers with soldiers

strikes1
Strikes

In the black of the winter of nineteen nine,

When we froze and bled on the picket line,

We showed the world that women could fight

And we rose and won with women’s might.

Chorus:

Hail the waistmakers of nineteen nine,

Making their stand on the picket line,

Breaking the power of those who reign,

Pointing the way, smashing the chain.

And we gave new courage to the men

Who carried on in nineteen ten

And shoulder to shoulder we’ll win through,

Led by the I.L.G.W.U.

— Let’s Sing!, Educational Department, International

Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union, New York City

Which type of labor-related action is best described in this song?

  • a strike

(2) an open shop

(3) a boycott

(4) an injunction

strikes2
Strikes

The Anthracite Coal Strike (1902), the Wagner

Act (1935), and the founding of the United Farm

Workers (1962) were important steps in

(1) limiting the growth of labor unions

(2) creating greater equality for women

(3) ending discrimination directed at African

Americans in the South

(4) promoting fair labor practices and collective

bargaining for workers

strikes3
Strikes

In the late 1800s, the Homestead steel strike and

the Pullman railcar strike were unsuccessful

because

(1) the government supported business owners

(2) most workers refused to take part in the strike

(3) the Supreme Court ruled both strikes were

illegal

(4) factory owners hired children to replace the

strikers

granger movement
Granger Movement

In the 1870s, the Granger movement was

organized to promote the interests of

  • suffragists

(2) farmers

(3) factory workers

(4) recent immigrants

granger movement1
Granger Movement

In the late 1800s, the Granger movement tried to improve conditions for farmers by

(1) lowering the rate of inflation

(2) strengthening the gold standard

(3) forcing railroads to lower their rates

(4) making labor unions stronger

populists
Populists

During the 1890s, many American farmers tried

to resolve their economic problems by

(1) joining the Populist Party

(2) staging violent protests against the

government

(3) supporting government aid to railroads

(4) asking Congress to end agricultural subsidies

populists1
Populists

Speaker A: Feeding and clothing the poor is a

mistake. Just as nature weeds out unfit

members, a capitalist society should be

allowed to do the same.

Speaker B: To provide for the common good and protect the people, the government

should pass laws to prevent the sale of

alcohol.

Speaker C: To promote economic growth, the

government should expand United

States markets overseas.

Speaker D: Since transportation is a public

necessity, the government should own

and operate the railroads in the public

interest.

Which third party held beliefs most similar to those expressed by Speaker D?

(1) Know-Nothing

(2) Greenback

(3) Populist

(4) Bull Moose

populists2
Populists

We mean to make things over,

we are tired of toil for naught,

With but bare enough to live upon,

and never an hour for thought;

We want to feel the sunshine,

and we want to smell the flowers,

We are sure that God has will’d it,

and we mean to have eight hours.

We’re summoning our forces

from the shipyard, shop and mill,

Chorus.

Eight hours for work, eight hours for rest,

eight hours for what we will!

Eight hours for work, eight hours for rest,

eight hours for what we will!

— I.G. Blanchard, “Eight Hours,” 1878

During the late 1800s, the ideas expressed in these lyrics were the goals of

(1) organizers of labor unions

(2) sharecroppers following the Civil War

(3) Grangers demanding railroad regulation

(4) owners of big businesses

populists3
Populists

In the late 1800s, which group most often

supported the views of the Populist Party?

  • factory owners

(2) nativists

(3) farmers

(4) labor unions

populists4
Populists

The national income tax, free and unlimited

coinage of silver, and the direct election of

senators were proposals that were included in the

(1) Declaration of Sentiments

(2) Republican plan for Reconstruction

(3) Populist Party platform

(4) Federal Reserve System

populists5
Populists

Which trend is shown in these graphs?

(1) When production increases, prices decrease.

(2) When production increases, prices increase.

(3) When production remains unchanged, prices decrease.

(4) Prices and production are usually unrelated.

populists6
Populists

As a result of the trends shown in the graphs, the Populist Party wanted the federal government to increase the money supply to

(1) raise the prices of crops

(2) limit the exportation of corn

(3) discourage the consumption of corn

(4) increase agricultural imports

populists7
Populists

Which reform idea was a common goal of the

Populists and the Progressives?

(1) restoration of the nation’s cities

(2) expansion of opportunities for immigrants

(3) improvement in the status of African Americans

(4) greater control of government by the people

populists8
Populists

The success of the Populist Party of the 1890s can

best be measured by which development?

(1) The party replaced one of the two major parties.

(2) The party gained support among business

leaders.

(3) Two of the party’s candidates were elected to

the presidency.

(4) Several of the party’s proposed reforms were

made into laws.

gold standard
Gold Standard

To improve distribution of money and guarantee

an adequate money supply, President Woodrow

Wilson asked Congress to

(1) eliminate the gold standard

(2) limit foreign investment

(3) provide insurance for bank deposits

(4) establish the Federal Reserve System

interstate commerce act
Interstate Commerce Act

The Interstate Commerce Act (1887), the

Sherman Antitrust Act (1890), and the Clayton

Antitrust Act (1914) are similar in that they were

intended to

(1) reaffirm the federal government’s laissezfaire

attitude toward big business

(2) increase the federal government’s power to

regulate business practices

(3) authorize the breakup of labor unions

(4) reject the use of trustbusting

interstate commerce act1
Interstate Commerce Act

The Interstate Commerce Act (1887) and the

Sherman Antitrust Act (1890) were efforts by the

federal government to

(1) regulate some aspects of business

(2) expand the positive features of the trusts

(3) favor big business over small companies

(4) move toward government ownership of key

industries

interstate commerce act2
Interstate Commerce Act

The Interstate Commerce Act and the Sherman

Antitrust Act were attempts by Congress to

(1) regulate the activities of big business

(2) protect consumers against unsafe products

(3) impose government regulations on agricultural

production

(4) bring transportation activities under government

ownership

interstate commerce act3
Interstate Commerce Act

Both the Interstate Commerce Act and the

Sherman Antitrust Act were

(1) inspired by the effectiveness of earlier state laws

(2) designed to protect business from foreign

competition

(3) declared unconstitutional by the Supreme

Court in the late 1800s

(4) passed by the federal government to regulate

big business

social darwinism
Social Darwinism

Speaker A: Feeding and clothing the poor is a

mistake. Just as nature weeds out unfit

members, a capitalist society should be

allowed to do the same.

Speaker B: To provide for the common good and

protect the people, the government

should pass laws to prevent the sale of

alcohol.

Speaker C: To promote economic growth, the

government should expand United

States markets overseas.

Speaker D: Since transportation is a public

necessity, the government should own

and operate the railroads in the public

interest.

Which speaker would most likely support the theory of Social Darwinism?

(1) A

(2) B

(3) C

(4) D

social darwinism1
Social Darwinism

Society advances when its fittest members are

allowed to assert themselves with the least

hindrance.

The idea expressed in this statement is most

consistent with the

(1) principles of Social Darwinism

(2) concept of assimilation

(3) goals of the Progressive movement

(4) melting pot theory of American culture

social darwinism2
Social Darwinism

In the late 19th century, the ideas of Social

Darwinism were used primarily to

(1) encourage the passage of compulsory

education laws

(2) explain the differences in income between

the rich and the poor

(3) urge Congress to end immigration

(4) support the growth of new political parties

social darwinism3
Social Darwinism

In the late 1800s, the principles of Social

Darwinism were most consistent with the ideas of

(1) Populism

(2) laissez-faire economics

(3) trustbusting

(4) utopian socialism

social darwinism4
Social Darwinism

The theory of Social Darwinism was often used to justify the

(1) creation of the Ku Klux Klan

(2) formation of business monopolies

(3) use of strikes by labor unions

(4) passage of antitrust laws

social darwinism5
Social Darwinism

During the late 1800s, the principles of Social

Darwinism were used to justify

(1) support for unlimited immigration

(2) desegregation of public facilities

(3) the use of strikes by organized labor

(4) the accumulation of great wealth by

industrialists

social darwinism6
Social Darwinism

“The growth of a large business is merely survival

of the fittest. The American beauty rose can be

produced in the splendor and fragrance which

bring cheer to its beholder only by sacrificing the

early buds which grow up around it. This is not

an evil tendency in business. It is merely the

working out of a law of nature and a law of God.

. . .”

— John D. Rockefeller, Jr.

Which concept is described by this passage?

(1) communism

(2) Populism

(3) utopian socialism

(4) Social Darwinism

social darwinism7
Social Darwinism

Which idea of the late 1800s is most closely

associated with this cartoon?

(1) regulated capitalism

(2) graduated income tax

(3) Social Darwinism

(4) the Gospel of Wealth

social darwinism8
Social Darwinism

During the late 1800s, the defenders of Social

Darwinism would most likely have supported

(1) labor unions

(2) progressive income taxes

(3) laissez-faire capitalism

(4) environmental conservation

social darwinism9
Social Darwinism

During the late 1800s, the idea of Social

Darwinism was used to explain the

(1) development of the Granger movement

(2) need for settlement homes

(3) creation of a national parks system

(4) success or failure of businesses

assembly line
Assembly Line

I will build a motor car for the great multitude. It will be large enough for the family but small enough for the individual to run and care for. It will be constructed of the best materials, by the best men to be hired, after the simplest designs that modern engineering can devise. But it will be so low in price that no man making a good salary will be unable to own one— and enjoy with his family the blessing of hours of pleasure in God’s great open spaces.

— Henry Ford, 1909

Which action is most closely associated with Henry Ford’s attempt to realize this vision?

(1) providing cars in a variety of models

(2) creating a business monopoly

(3) downsizing the labor force

(4) using the assembly line

assembly line1
Assembly Line

Henry Ford’s use of the assembly line in the

production of automobiles led directly to

(1) a decrease in the number of automobiles

available

(2) a decrease in the cost of automobiles

(3) an increase in the unemployment rate

(4) an increase in the time needed to produce a

single automobile

assembly line2
Assembly Line

The overall trend shown on the graph was primarily the result of

(1) a decline in the economy

(2) the increased use of the assembly line

(3) a shift of the population from urban areas to farms

(4) an increase in the price of automobiles

socialism
Socialism

Has not appeared in exam questions yet…

Definition: a political and economic theory of social organization that advocates that the means of production, distribution, and exchange should be owned or regulated by the community as a whole.