unit 4 2 exam questions n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Unit 4-2 Exam Questions PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Unit 4-2 Exam Questions

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 104

Unit 4-2 Exam Questions - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 98 Views
  • Uploaded on

Unit 4-2 Exam Questions. Directions. Click the indicated icon to begin the slide show Press the right arrow key on the keyboard once to reveal the answer Press the right arrow key once more to advance to the next question. Table of Contents. Spanish-American War Imperialism

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Unit 4-2 Exam Questions' - tejana


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
directions
Directions
  • Click the indicated icon to begin the slide show
  • Press the right arrow key on the keyboard once to reveal the answer
  • Press the right arrow key once more to advance to the next question
table of contents
Table of Contents
  • Spanish-American War
  • Imperialism
  • Yellow Journalism
  • Open Door Policy
  • Roosevelt Corollary
  • “Big Stick” Policy
  • Panama Canal
  • Dollar Diplomacy
  • Unrestricted Submarine Warfare
  • Schenck v. United States (1919)
  • “Clear And Present Danger”
  • WWI Propaganda
  • Fourteen Points
  • League Of Nations
  • Treaty Of Versailles (Senate Rejection)
spanish american war
Spanish-American War

One result of the Spanish-American War of 1898

was that the United States was

(1) recognized as a world power

(2) committed to isolationism

(3) drawn into World War II

(4) forced into an economic depression

spanish american war1
Spanish-American War

An important result of the Spanish-American

War of 1898 was that the United States

(1) acquired territories in Africa

(2) became a world power with an overseas

empire

(3) improved its relations with Germany

(4) lost interest in Latin American affairs

spanish american war2
Spanish-American War

The explosion of the USS Maine and the practice

of yellow journalism played a significant role in the

(1) public’s support for the Spanish-American War

(2) creation of the Open Door policy

(3) acquisition of Florida

(4) purchase of Alaska

spanish american war3
Spanish-American War

Which headline related to the Spanish-American

War is an example of yellow journalism?

(1) “President McKinley Asks Congress for War

Declaration Against Spain”

(2) “United States Mobilizes for War with Spain”

(3) “United States Demands Response to Spanish

Actions”

(4) “Spanish Troops Slaughter Innocent Cuban

Citizens”

spanish american war4
Spanish-American War

The practice of yellow journalism most directly

influenced the

(1) purchase of Alaska

(2) acquisition of the Mexican Cession

(3) start of the Spanish-American War

(4) end of the Russo-Japanese War

spanish american war5
Spanish-American War

Which war is most closely associated with the

emergence of the United States as a world power?

(1) War of 1812

(2) Mexican War

(3) Civil War

(4) Spanish-American War

spanish american war6
Spanish-American War

Yellow journalism contributed to the start of the

Spanish-American War (1898) by

(1) portraying William McKinley as a pro-war

president

(2) inciting public outrage over conditions in Cuba

(3) showing the need to acquire colonies in the Pacific

(4) demanding the repeal of the Gentlemen’s

Agreement

spanish american war7
Spanish-American War

Yellow journalists created support for the

Spanish-American War by writing articles about

the

(1) political popularity of William Jennings Bryan

(2) efforts of the United States to control Mexico

(3) destruction of United States sugar plantations

by Hawaiians

(4) sinking of the United States battleship Maine

in Havana Harbor

spanish american war8
Spanish-American War

News organizations were engaging in yellow

journalism before the Spanish-American War

when

(1) publishers tried to prevent the war

(2) articles about Cuba were fair and balanced

(3) editors exaggerated events to build support

for war

(4) writers ignored the situation in Cuba

spanish american war9
Spanish-American War

As a result of the Spanish-American War, the

United States saw the need to build the Panama

Canal because

(1) new colonies had been acquired in Africa

(2) Spanish opposition to the canal had ended

(3) the United States navy could then move more

quickly between oceans

(4) United States railroads could not transport

enough manufactured goods

spanish american war10
Spanish-American War

The main purpose of this map is to illustrate the

(1) sources of important natural resources

(2) development of United States imperialism

(3) growth of the Atlantic slave trade

(4) results of the Spanish-American War

spanish american war11
Spanish-American War

The conclusion that can best be supported by the information on this map is that construction of the Panama Canal was motivated by the desire of the United States to

(1) raise the living standards of Latin American people

(2) increase naval mobility and expand overseas markets

(3) improve relations with Latin American and Asian nations

(4) maintain a policy of collective security

spanish american war12
Spanish-American War

The Spanish-American War (1898) marked a

turning point in United States foreign policy

because the United States

(1) developed a plan for peaceful coexistence

(2) emerged as a major world power

(3) pledged neutrality in future European conflicts

(4) refused to become a colonial power

spanish american war13
Spanish-American War

Publication of this and similar news stories encouraged Congress to

(1) declare war on Spain

(2) improve naval safety

(3) pass antiterrorist legislation

(4) conduct a criminal investigation

imperialism
Imperialism

Which heading best completes the partial outline

below?

(1) Reasons to Declare War on Spain

(2) Justification for American Imperialism

(3) Theodore Roosevelt’s Political Platform

(4) Yellow Journalism in Newspapers

imperialism1
Imperialism

Which foreign policy is the main issue of this cartoon?

(1) containment

(2) imperialism

(3) internationalism

(4) neutrality

imperialism2
Imperialism

Between the 1890s and the start of World War I, the United States expanded its access to overseas markets and raw materials through the policy of

(1) containment

(2) imperialism

(3) isolationism

(4) neutrality

imperialism3
Imperialism

Which United States foreign policy is the subject of this 1904 cartoon?

(1) imperialism

(2) neutrality

(3) isolationism

(4) containment

The cartoonist is expressing concerns about the ability of the United States to

(1) accept citizens from foreign countries

(2) control territories spread out over vast distances

(3) support human rights around the world

(4) maintain a trade surplus with new trading partners

imperialism4
Imperialism

In the 1890s, the main goal of those who

supported United States imperialism was to

(1) bring self-government to areas under United

States control

(2) obtain overseas markets and naval bases

(3) defend against attacks by enemy nations

(4) spread democracy to Africa and Latin

America

imperialism5
Imperialism

Critics of the actions shown in this cartoon claimed President Theodore Roosevelt was

(1) causing environmental damage

(2) requiring massive tax increases

(3) following a policy of imperialism

(4) producing major trade deficits with China

imperialism6
Imperialism

The closing of the frontier and the growth of

industry in the late 1800s are two factors often

associated with the

(1) reduction of exports to Asian nations

(2) restoration of a plantation economy in the

South

(3) formation of alliances with other nations

(4) rise of United States imperialism

imperialism7
Imperialism

Which heading best completes the partial outline

below?

(1) Consequences of World War I

(2) Results of the Gentlemen’s Agreement

(3) Events Leading to Neutrality

(4) Factors Supporting United States Imperialism

imperialism8
Imperialism

The main purpose of this map is to illustrate the

(1) sources of important natural resources

(2) development of United States imperialism

(3) growth of the Atlantic slave trade

(4) results of the Spanish-American War

imperialism9
Imperialism

Which United States policy is most closely associated with the annexation of Hawaii and the Philippines?

(1) neutrality

(2) isolationism

(3) imperialism

(4) international cooperation

imperialism10
Imperialism

Which conclusion is most clearly supported by information on the map?

(1) The United States respected the sovereignty of Latin American nations.

(2) United States military action was used to protect American interests.

(3) The United States rarely used its armed forces in Latin America before World War II.

(4) United States military action in Latin America supported European colonies.

imperialism11
Imperialism

Which United States foreign policy was most often used to carry out the actions shown on the map?

(1) Roosevelt Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine

(2) Wilson’s Fourteen Points

(3) Kellogg-Briand Pact

(4) Open Door

imperialism12
Imperialism

Which title would be the most accurate for this map?

(1) Ending Colonization in Latin America

(2) Promoting Trade with Latin America

(3) Humanitarian Aid in the Western Hemisphere

(4) United States Intervention in the Caribbean Area

imperialism13
Imperialism

The United States government justified most of the actions shown on the map by citing the

(1) terms of the Roosevelt corollary to the Monroe Doctrine

(2) threats from Germany after World War I

(3) desire to stop illegal immigration from Latin America

(4) need to protect Latin America from the threat of communism

yellow journalism
Yellow Journalism

The explosion of the USS Maine and the practice

of yellow journalism played a significant role in the

(1) public’s support for the Spanish-American War

(2) creation of the Open Door policy

(3) acquisition of Florida

(4) purchase of Alaska

yellow journalism1
Yellow Journalism

Which headline related to the Spanish-American

War is an example of yellow journalism?

(1) “President McKinley Asks Congress for War

Declaration Against Spain”

(2) “United States Mobilizes for War with Spain”

(3) “United States Demands Response to Spanish

Actions”

(4) “Spanish Troops Slaughter Innocent Cuban

Citizens”

yellow journalism2
Yellow Journalism

The practice of yellow journalism most directly

influenced the

(1) purchase of Alaska

(2) acquisition of the Mexican Cession

(3) start of the Spanish-American War

(4) end of the Russo-Japanese War

yellow journalism3
Yellow Journalism

Yellow journalism contributed to the start of the

Spanish-American War (1898) by

(1) portraying William McKinley as a pro-war

president

(2) inciting public outrage over conditions in Cuba

(3) showing the need to acquire colonies in the Pacific

(4) demanding the repeal of the Gentlemen’s

Agreement

yellow journalism4
Yellow Journalism

Which factor is most closely associated with the

decision of the United States to declare war on

Spain in 1898?

(1) isolationist policy

(2) labor union pressure

(3) yellow journalism

(4) unrestricted submarine warfare

yellow journalism5
Yellow Journalism

News organizations were engaging in yellow

journalism before the Spanish-American War

when

(1) publishers tried to prevent the war

(2) articles about Cuba were fair and balanced

(3) editors exaggerated events to build support

for war

(4) writers ignored the situation in Cuba

yellow journalism6
Yellow Journalism

The headlines in this newspaper are an example of

(1) yellow journalism

(2) investigative reporting

(3) muckraking literature

(4) government censorship

yellow journalism7
Yellow Journalism

Publication of this and similar news stories encouraged Congress to

(1) declare war on Spain

(2) improve naval safety

(3) pass antiterrorist legislation

(4) conduct a criminal investigation

open door policy
Open Door Policy

The United States issued the Open Door policy

(1899–1900) primarily to

(1) bring democratic government to the Chinese

people

(2) secure equal trade opportunities in China

(3) force China to change its immigration

policies

(4) use China as a stepping stone to trade with

Japan

open door policy1
Open Door Policy

The United States promoted its economic

interest in China by

(1) intervening in the Sino-Japanese War

(2) passing the Chinese Exclusion Act

(3) encouraging the Boxer Rebellion

(4) adopting the Open Door policy

open door policy2
Open Door Policy

A primary reason for the establishment of the

Open Door policy (1899) was to

(1) protect United States trade in the Far East

(2) gain control of the Panama Canal Zone

(3) encourage Chinese immigration to the

United States

(4) improve relations with Russia

open door policy3
Open Door Policy

By proclaiming the Open Door policy in 1899, the United States was attempting to

(1) keep Japan from attacking and colonizing China

(2) increase trade between Russia and the United States

(3) ensure equal trading opportunities in China

(4) prevent European countries from colonizing the Western Hemisphere

open door policy4
Open Door Policy

The main reason the United States implemented

the Open Door policy in China was to

(1) promote immigration

(2) expand democratic reforms

(3) encourage religious freedom

(4) guarantee access to markets

open door policy5
Open Door Policy

The Open Door policy of 1899 was originally

adopted so that the United States could

(1) restrict Chinese immigration

(2) stop Japan from colonizing China

(3) gain equal trading rights in China

(4) encourage the development of democracy in

China

open door policy6
Open Door Policy

Which heading best completes the partial outline

below?

(1) American Domestic Programs

(2) Cold War Events

(3) United States Interventionism

(4) Efforts at Isolationism

roosevelt corollary
Roosevelt Corollary

President Theodore Roosevelt’s Corollary to the

Monroe Doctrine primarily affected Latin

America by

(1) guaranteeing human rights throughout the

Western Hemisphere

(2) supporting independence movements in

many countries

(3) encouraging immigration to the United States

(4) increasing United States intervention in the

region

roosevelt corollary1
Roosevelt Corollary

Which United States foreign policy was most often used to carry out the actions shown on the map?

(1) Roosevelt Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine

(2) Wilson’s Fourteen Points

(3) Kellogg-Briand Pact

(4) Open Door

roosevelt corollary2
Roosevelt Corollary

The United States government justified most of the actions shown on the map by citing the

(1) terms of the Roosevelt corollary to the Monroe Doctrine

(2) threats from Germany after World War I

(3) desire to stop illegal immigration from Latin America

(4) need to protect Latin America from the threat of communism

roosevelt corollary3
Roosevelt Corollary

Which heading best completes the partial outline

below?

(1) American Domestic Programs

(2) Cold War Events

(3) United States Interventionism

(4) Efforts at Isolationism

big stick policy
“Big Stick” Policy

President Theodore Roosevelt’s Big Stick policy

is most closely associated with

(1) friendly relations with China after the Boxer

Rebellion

(2) conservation of natural resources

(3) court actions to support business monopolies

(4) intervention in Latin American affairs

big stick policy1
“Big Stick” Policy

President Theodore Roosevelt’s Big Stick policy

was used by the United States to

(1) police the Western Hemisphere

(2) expand its colonial empire in Africa

(3) isolate itself from European conflicts

(4) settle a dispute between Russia and Japan

big stick policy2
“Big Stick” Policy

A goal of President Theodore Roosevelt’s Big Stick policy and President William Howard Taft’s Dollar Diplomacy policy toward Latin America was to

(1) join Western Hemisphere nations in a military alliance

(2) protect American economic and political interests

(3) encourage foreign nations to establish colonies

(4) raise Latin America’s standard of living

panama canal
Panama Canal

The cartoon illustrates the actions of President Theodore Roosevelt in

(1) securing the land to build the Panama Canal

(2) leading troops in the Spanish-American War

(3) ending the war between Russia and Japan

(4) improving diplomatic relations with Latin American nations

panama canal1
Panama Canal

Critics of the actions shown in this cartoon claimed President Theodore Roosevelt was

(1) causing environmental damage

(2) requiring massive tax increases

(3) following a policy of imperialism

(4) producing major trade deficits with China

panama canal2
Panama Canal

As a result of the Spanish-American War, the

United States saw the need to build the Panama

Canal because

(1) new colonies had been acquired in Africa

(2) Spanish opposition to the canal had ended

(3) the United States navy could then move more

quickly between oceans

(4) United States railroads could not transport

enough manufactured goods

panama canal3
Panama Canal

The conclusion that can best be supported by the information on this map is that construction of the Panama Canal was motivated by the desire of the United States to

(1) raise the living standards of Latin American people

(2) increase naval mobility and expand overseas markets

(3) improve relations with Latin American and Asian nations

(4) maintain a policy of collective security

dollar diplomacy
Dollar Diplomacy

The policy of Dollar Diplomacy, the Good

Neighbor policy, and the Alliance for Progress

were designed to

(1) increase United States influence in Latin

America

(2) open trade with Southeast Asia

(3) maintain peace with European nations

(4) provide foreign aid to African nations

dollar diplomacy1
Dollar Diplomacy

A goal of President Theodore Roosevelt’s Big Stick policy and President William Howard Taft’s Dollar Diplomacy policy toward Latin America was to

(1) join Western Hemisphere nations in a military alliance

(2) protect American economic and political

interests

(3) encourage foreign nations to establish colonies

(4) raise Latin America’s standard of living

unrestricted submarine warfare
Unrestricted Submarine Warfare

We intend to begin on the first of February unrestricted submarine warfare. We shall endeavor in spite of this to keep the United States of America neutral. In the event of this not succeeding, we make Mexico a proposal of alliance on the following basis: make war together, make peace together, generous financial support and an understanding on our part that Mexico is to reconquer the lost territory in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. The settlement in detail is left to you.…

— Telegram of January 19, 1917

This telegram was part of an effort to

(1) form an alliance between Germany and the United States

(2) convince several western states to secede from the United States

(3) bring Mexico into World War I on the side of Great Britain and France

(4) enlist Mexican support for Germany if the United States declared war

unrestricted submarine warfare1
Unrestricted Submarine Warfare

Which action was a result of the other three?

(1) Germany’s policy of unrestricted submarine

warfare

(2) United States entry into World War I

(3) interception of the Zimmermann Note

(4) United States loans to Allied nations

unrestricted submarine warfare2
Unrestricted Submarine Warfare

Which event most influenced President Woodrow

Wilson’s decision to enter World War I?

(1) defeat of Russia by Germany

(2) assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand

(3) raids by Mexico on the southwestern United

States

(4) renewal of unrestricted submarine warfare by

Germany

unrestricted submarine warfare3
Unrestricted Submarine Warfare

. . . With a profound sense of the solemn and even tragicalcharacter of the step I am taking and of the grave responsibilities which it involves, but in unhesitating obedience to what I deem my constitutional duty, I advise that the Congress declare the recent course of the Imperial German Government to be in fact nothing less than war against the government and people of the United States; that it formally accept the status of belligerent which has thus been thrust upon it, and that it take immediate steps not only to put the country in a more thorough state of defense but also to exert all its power and employ all its resources to bring the Government of the German Empire to terms and end the war. . . .

Which presidential action is the focus of this statement?

(1) William McKinley’s request for war in 1898

(2) Theodore Roosevelt’s support for the Panamanian revolt in 1903

(3) William Howard Taft’s decision to send troops to Latin America in 1912

(4) Woodrow Wilson’s response to unrestricted submarine warfare in 1917

unrestricted submarine warfare4
Unrestricted Submarine Warfare

What was a major reason the United States

entered World War I (1917)?

(1) The Japanese had occupied Manchuria.

(2) Foreign troops had landed on American soil.

(3) The Austro-Hungarian Empire had invaded

Belgium.

(4) Germany had resumed unrestricted submarine

warfare.

unrestricted submarine warfare5
Unrestricted Submarine Warfare

During his reelection campaign in 1916, President Woodrow Wilson used the slogan, “He kept us out of war.” In April of 1917, Wilson asked Congress to declare war on Germany. What helped bring about this change?

(1) Bolshevik forces increased their strength in Germany and Italy.

(2) Britain was invaded by nations of the Central Powers.

(3) Russia signed a treaty of alliance with the Central Powers.

(4) Germany resumed unrestricted submarine warfare.

schenck v united states 1919
Schenck v. United States (1919)

The Supreme Court decision in Schenck v. United States (1919) and the passage of the USA Patriot Act (2001) demonstrate the principle that the federal government can

(1) guarantee citizens the right to bear arms

(2) restrict the power of the president

(3) limit individual rights in times of national

emergency

(4) expand the liberties protected by the Bill of

Rights

schenck v united states 19191
Schenck v. United States (1919)

The Supreme Court decision in Schenck v.

United States (1919) and the USA Patriot Act of

2001 both dealt with the power of the federal

government to

(1) suspend the writ of habeas corpus

(2) restrict freedom of religion

(3) deny civil rights to those who lack citizenship

(4) limit civil liberties for reasons of national

security

schenck v united states 19192
Schenck v. United States (1919)

The “clear and present danger” doctrine

established in Schenck v. United States (1919)

concerned the issue of

(1) freedom of speech

(2) the right to bear arms

(3) the right to an attorney

(4) separation of church and state

schenck v united states 19193
Schenck v. United States (1919)

In Schenck v. United States (1919), the Supreme

Court decided that a “clear and present danger”

to the country allowed the federal government to

(1) establish a peacetime draft

(2) restrict first amendment rights

(3) suspend habeas corpus

(4) limit minority voting rights

schenck v united states 19194
Schenck v. United States (1919)

What was the effect of the “clear and present

danger” ruling established in Schenck v. United

States (1919)?

(1) placing limits on constitutional freedoms

(2) decreasing the president’s powers during

wartime

(3) limiting the hours women could work in

industry

(4) upholding the right of states to regulate child

labor

schenck v united states 19195
Schenck v. United States (1919)

In both Schenck v. United States (1919) and

Korematsu v. United States (1944), the Supreme

Court ruled that during wartime

(1) civil liberties may be limited

(2) women can fight in combat

(3) drafting of noncitizens is permitted

(4) sale of alcohol is illegal

schenck v united states 19196
Schenck v. United States (1919)

Which argument was used by the Supreme Court

in reaching its “clear and present danger” ruling

in Schenck v. United States (1919)?

(1) The military is under civilian control.

(2) Powers are separated between the federal

and state governments.

(3) Constitutional rights are not absolute.

(4) The Constitution provides for equal pro -

tection under the laws

schenck v united states 19197
Schenck v. United States (1919)

Which issue was the focus of the Supreme Court

decision in Schenck v. United States (1919)?

(1) freedom of speech for war protesters

(2) relocation of ethnic minority groups

(3) use of detention camps for enemy aliens

(4) integration of military forces

schenck v united states 19198
Schenck v. United States (1919)

In Schenck v. United States (1919), the Supreme Court upheld the right of government to protect national security during wartime by

(1) nationalizing important industries that supported the war effort

(2) limiting speech that presented a clear and present danger to the nation

(3) suspending the writ of habeas corpus for illegal aliens

(4) expelling enemy aliens who had favored the Central Powers

schenck v united states 19199
Schenck v. United States (1919)

The Supreme Court decision in Schenck v.

United States (1919) stated that

(1) immigrants have limited rights

(2) freedom of speech is not absolute

(3) rights of the accused may not be limited

(4) women should be granted suffrage

schenck v united states 191910
Schenck v. United States (1919)

The clear-and-present danger doctrine established in Schenck v. United States (1919) permits the government to

(1) declare war on any nation that attacks the United States

(2) limit speech that threatens the security of the nation

(3) break up monopolies that limit business competition

(4) outlaw organizations that threaten the civil rights of others

schenck v united states 191911
Schenck v. United States (1919)

The “clear and present danger” doctrine stated by

the Supreme Court in the case of Schenck v.

United States (1919) had an important impact on

the Bill of Rights because it

(1) limited the powers of the president

(2) placed limits on freedom of speech

(3) clarified standards for a fair trial

(4) expanded the rights of persons accused of crimes

clear and present danger
“Clear and Present Danger”

The “clear and present danger” doctrine

established in Schenck v. United States (1919)

concerned the issue of

(1) freedom of speech

(2) the right to bear arms

(3) the right to an attorney

(4) separation of church and state

clear and present danger1
“Clear and Present Danger”

What was the effect of the “clear and present danger” ruling established in Schenck v. United States (1919)?

(1) placing limits on constitutional freedoms

(2) decreasing the president’s powers during wartime

(3) limiting the hours women could work in industry

(4) upholding the right of states to regulate child

labor

clear and present danger2
“Clear and Present Danger”

Which argument was used by the Supreme Court

in reaching its “clear and present danger” ruling

in Schenck v. United States (1919)?

(1) The military is under civilian control.

(2) Powers are separated between the federal

and state governments.

(3) Constitutional rights are not absolute.

(4) The Constitution provides for equal pro -

tection under the laws

clear and present danger3
“Clear and Present Danger”

In Schenck v. United States (1919), the Supreme Court upheld the right of government to protect national security during wartime by

(1) nationalizing important industries that supported the war effort

(2) limiting speech that presented a clear and present danger to the nation

(3) suspending the writ of habeas corpus for illegal aliens

(4) expelling enemy aliens who had favored the Central Powers

clear and present danger4
“Clear and Present Danger”

The clear-and-present danger doctrine established

in Schenck v. United States (1919) permits the government to

(1) declare war on any nation that attacks the United States

(2) limit speech that threatens the security of the nation

(3) break up monopolies that limit business competition

(4) outlaw organizations that threaten the civil rights of others

clear and present danger5
“Clear and Present Danger”

The “clear and present danger” doctrine stated by

the Supreme Court in the case of Schenck v.

United States (1919) had an important impact on

the Bill of Rights because it

(1) limited the powers of the president

(2) placed limits on freedom of speech

(3) clarified standards for a fair trial

(4) expanded the rights of persons accused of crimes

world war i propaganda
World War I Propaganda

This poster was used during the administration of President Woodrow Wilson to

(1) convince men to enlist in the military services

(2) help finance the war effort

(3) support membership in the League of Nations

(4) emphasize the goals of the Fourteen Points

fourteen points
Fourteen Points

President Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points were proposed during World War I primarily to

(1) define postwar objectives for the United States

(2) outline military strategies for the United States

(3) convince other democratic nations to join the United Nations

(4) strengthen the United States policy of isolationism

fourteen points1
Fourteen Points

A major purpose of President Woodrow Wilson’s

Fourteen Points (1918) was to

(1) ask Congress to enter World War I

(2) set goals for achieving peace after World War I

(3) provide an aid program for rebuilding

war-torn nations

(4) retaliate for the sinking of the Lusitania

fourteen points2
Fourteen Points

One goal for a lasting peace that President Woodrow Wilson included in his Fourteen Points was

(1) establishing a League of Nations

(2) maintaining a permanent military force in Europe

(3) returning the United States to a policy of

isolationism

(4) blaming Germany for causing World War I

league of nations
League of Nations

The United States Senate refused to ratify the Treaty of Versailles after World War I because many senators believed

(1) President Woodrow Wilson was too ill to sign the treaty

(2) most Americans had sympathized with Germany during the war

(3) the treaty would not require reparations from Germany

(4) the League of Nations could draw the United States into future wars

league of nations1
League Of Nations

The Senate’s opposition to United States

membership in the League of Nations was based

mainly on the

(1) cost of membership dues

(2) failure to give the United States veto power

(3) fear of being drawn into future wars

(4) concern that United States businesses would

be damaged

league of nations2
League Of Nations

The vote by the United States Senate on the

Treaty of Versailles (1919) demonstrated

(1) an unwillingness to join the League of

Nations

(2) a commitment to collective security

(3) a belief that the nation required a stronger

military

(4) a rejection of colonialism

league of nations3
League Of Nations

Isolationists in the Senate objected to the United

States joining the League of Nations because they

opposed

(1) creation of the Security Council

(2) colonialism in Africa and Asia

(3) membership in the League by Germany

(4) involvement in future foreign wars

league of nations4
League Of Nations

Many United States senators refused to support

membership in the League of Nations because

they believed that it would

(1) endanger United States economic growth

(2) force the United States to give up its colonies

(3) grant the president the power to annex new

territory

(4) involve the United States in future foreign

conflicts

league of nations5
League Of Nations

After World War I, the United States Senate

refused to approve the Treaty of Versailles. This

action reflected the Senate’s intention to

(1) provide support for the League of Nations

(2) punish the nations that began the war

(3) return to a policy of isolationism

(4) maintain United States leadership in world

affairs

league of nations6
League Of Nations

President George Washington in his Farewell

Address, President James Monroe in the Monroe

Doctrine, and the opponents of the League of

Nations all wanted the United States to

(1) avoid European conflicts

(2) avoid trade with foreign nations

(3) refuse diplomatic recognition of nondemocratic

nations

(4) reduce foreign influence by establishing

immigration quotas

league of nations7
League Of Nations

The change in the nation’s attitude toward

membership in the League of Nations and

membership in the United Nations shows the

contrast between

(1) neutrality and containment

(2) appeasement and internationalism

(3) isolationism and involvement

(4) interventionism and détente

league of nations8
League Of Nations

One goal for a lasting peace that President

Woodrow Wilson included in his Fourteen Points

was

(1) establishing a League of Nations

(2) maintaining a permanent military force in

Europe

(3) returning the United States to a policy of

isolationism

(4) blaming Germany for causing World War I

treaty of versailles
Treaty of Versailles

The United States Senate refused to ratify the Treaty of Versailles after World War I because many senators believed

(1) President Woodrow Wilson was too ill to sign

the treaty

(2) most Americans had sympathized with

Germany during the war

(3) the treaty would not require reparations from

Germany

(4) the League of Nations could draw the United

States into future wars

treaty of versailles1
Treaty of Versailles

Henry Cabot Lodge and other senators opposed

ratification of the Treaty of Versailles (1919)

because they believed the treaty

(1) failed to punish Germany for its involvement

in World War I

(2) excluded reparations for European allies

(3) could draw the United States into future

conflicts

(4) placed blame for World War I on all the

warring countries

treaty of versailles2
Treaty of Versailles

The vote by the United States Senate on the

Treaty of Versailles (1919) demonstrated

(1) an unwillingness to join the League of Nations

(2) a commitment to collective security

(3) a belief that the nation required a stronger

military

(4) a rejection of colonialism

treaty of versailles3
Treaty of Versailles

One major reason the United States Senate

refused to approve the Treaty of Versailles after

World War I was that many senators

(1) were concerned about future United States

obligations in foreign affairs

(2) rejected United States colonial practices in

Asia

(3) wanted immediate repayment of war debts

from France

(4) supported increased foreign aid to Germany

treaty of versailles4
Treaty of Versailles

After World War I, the United States Senate

refused to approve the Treaty of Versailles. This

action reflected the Senate’s intention to

(1) provide support for the League of Nations

(2) punish the nations that began the war

(3) return to a policy of isolationism

(4) maintain United States leadership in world

affairs

treaty of versailles5
Treaty of Versailles

Following World War I, the United States Senate

refused to ratify the Treaty of Versailles primarily

because the treaty

(1) failed to include most of President Wilson’s

Fourteen Points

(2) did not punish Germany for starting the war

(3) contained provisions that might lead the

United States into foreign conflicts

(4) made no provision for reduction of military

weapons