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DRIVER FITNESS PowerPoint Presentation
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DRIVER FITNESS

DRIVER FITNESS

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DRIVER FITNESS

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  1. DRIVER FITNESS DRIVING SANE, SAFE, AND SOBER!

  2. Athletes prepare for competition. • Leaders prepare for speeches. • Teachers prepare their lessons. • Pilots prepare to fly. Why don't drivers prepare to DRIVE?

  3. EMOTIONS • Your emotional state affects the way you drive and the way you respond to other drivers.

  4. HEALTH • Your health affects the way you drive also!

  5. ATTITUDE • Your attitude may be the most important thing of all; in driving and all parts of your life!

  6. DRUGS: To use or not to use? Why do you think Idaho has a Zero Tolerance Law for persons under age 21? Why do some people choose not to use alcohol or other drugs?

  7. Your Choices and Responsibilities • List some short-term and long-term rewards. • List some short-term and long-term consequences. • Is alcohol and other drug use short-term or long term reward? • Are consequences of alcohol use short-term or long-term? • Easiest way to avoid the consequences is?

  8. BAC Factors 8 oz • Weight • Time Spent Drinking • Gender • Food • Alcohol Content • Size of Drink 0.04 0.08 220 lbs 110 lbs

  9. Are They The Same? • Beer • Whiskey • Wine • Cooler • Margarita

  10. How Much Light Beer (Male) Weight BAC Ounces of BAC Ounces of BAC Ounces of Male Light Beer Light Beer Light Beer 200 0.03 22 oz. 0.05 37 oz. 0.07 52 oz. 190 0.03 21 oz. 0.05 34 oz. 0.07 50 oz. 180 0.03 20 oz. 0.05 33 oz. 0.07 46 oz. 170 0.03 19 oz. 0.05 32 oz. 0.07 44 oz. 160 0.03 18 oz. 0.05 30 oz. 0.07 41 oz. 150 0.03 17 oz. 0.05 29 oz. 0.07 39 oz. 140 0.03 16 oz. 0.05 27 oz. 0.07 37 oz. 130 0.03 15 oz. 0.05 25 oz. 0.07 34 oz. 120 0.03 14 oz. 0.05 22 oz. 0.07 32 oz. 110 0.03 13 oz. 0.05 21 oz. 0.07 29 oz. 100 0.03 11 oz. 0.05 20 oz. 0.07 28 oz. 90 0.03 10 oz. 0.05 18 oz. 0.07 26 oz. 80 0.03 8 oz. 0.05 17 oz. 0.07 23 oz. 70 0.03 6 oz. 0.05 15 oz. 0.07 19 oz. 55 0.03 4 oz. 0.05 12 oz. 0.07 17 oz. Basic Assumption: 12 oz of Light Beer = 1 oz of 86 proof liquor

  11. How Much Light Beer (Female) Weight BAC Ounces of BAC Ounces of BAC Ounces of Female Light Beer Light Beer Light Beer 255 0.03 22 oz. 0.05 37 oz. 0.07 52 oz. 230 0.03 21 oz. 0.05 34 oz. 0.07 50 oz. 220 0.03 20 oz. 0.05 33 oz. 0.07 46 oz. 210 0.03 19 oz. 0.05 32 oz. 0.07 44 oz. 200 0.03 18 oz. 0.05 30 oz. 0.07 41 oz. 195 0.03 17 oz. 0.05 29 oz. 0.07 39 oz. 180 0.03 16 oz. 0.05 27 oz. 0.07 37 oz. 170 0.03 15 oz. 0.05 25 oz. 0.07 34 oz. 160 0.03 14 oz. 0.05 22 oz. 0.07 32 oz. 150 0.03 13 oz. 0.05 21 oz. 0.07 29 oz. 130 0.03 11 oz. 0.05 20 oz. 0.07 28 oz. 120 0.03 10 oz. 0.05 18 oz. 0.07 26 oz. 110 0.03 8 oz. 0.05 17 oz. 0.07 23 oz. 90 0.03 6 oz. 0.05 15 oz. 0.07 19 oz. 80 0.03 4 oz. 0.05 12 oz. 0.07 17 oz. Basic Assumption: 12 oz of Light Beer = 1 oz of 86 proof liquor

  12. Elimination of Alcohol } PROCESS TIME FACTORS Breath Urine Sweat 10% LIVER 90% About 0.015 BAC Reduction Per Hour Therefore: BAC of 0.05 = 3.5 hours for removal BAC of 0.07 = 5.0 hours for removal BAC of 0.10 = 7.0 hours for removal BAC of 0.15 = 10.0 hours for removal Assumption: Adult male 150-180 lbs. with normal liver function

  13. Elimination Rate BAC Stops Drinking @ 12:30am .16=Peak @ 1:00 INTOXICATED LEGALLY (.08) @ 6:00AM IMPAIRED (.05) @ 9:30AM HRS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ABSORPTION ELIMINATION

  14. Alcohol Affects the Body Liver Heart Sexuality Sleep Stomach Brain

  15. Alcohol Affects People Differently Tolerance Personality Mood Experience Fatigue Medication Weight Age

  16. Psychological Effects of Alcohol Use • Aggression • Tolerance • Attention • Memory • Emotions

  17. Alcohol and Space Management After drinking, the driver may tend to stare at the center line.

  18. Impaired Vision • Side Vision • Color Distinction (street lights) • Eye Focus • Double Vision • Distance Judgment

  19. Risk-Taking Problem The impaired brain is unable to make good judgments or smart decisions.

  20. Chance of Death for ages 16-19 by BAC levels BAC Increased Risk of Death .015 - .049 .05 - .079 .08 - .099 .10 - .149 .15 and greater 2.5 9 40 90 420 STUDY INCLUDES COMPARISON OF SINGLE VEHICLE COLLISIONS IN AGE GROUP

  21. Drugs and Driving • Perception • Judgment • Coordination • Vision • Mood

  22. Marijuana and Driving • Takes about 300 µg/kg to achieve a high • Effects at 300 µg/kg: • Tracking • Following Distance • Vigilance • Divided Attention

  23. Other Types of Drugs and Driving These can all affect driving behaviors and abilities Over the Counter Medications Prescription Medications • Tranquilizers • Stimulants • Narcotics

  24. Driving While “Fatigued” The Problem: • *64% of Americans get less than 8 hours of sleep each night. • *30% of Americans get less than 6 hours of sleep each night. • *Drowsiness causes an estimated 100,000 police-reported crashes in America each year, resulting in 76,000 injuries and 1,500 deaths. • *Some studies have shown that up to 20% of U.S. crashes are sleep-related; 1 in 5 crashes! If this is true - it’s an epidemic. • 23% of those in sleep-related crashes reported not feeling tired at all before the crash! You can’t rely on “feeling” tired as your warning. *AAAfoundation.org

  25. What is FATIGUE? • A Body Response • Follows a Period of: • Extended mental activity • Extended physical activity • May also be caused by: • A heavy meal • A period of time after having too much caffeine (regular use can result in chronic adrenal exhaustion) • Disruption of the natural sleep cycle • Characterized by: • Reduced capacity to perform tasks • Reduced abilities to concentrate

  26. Who is at Risk? • Those who are sleep-deprived • Those who drive during high-risk times of day or night • Those who drive during high-risk or high-stress conditions • Those who consume alcohol or use medications or drugs that interfere with ability to maintain alertness

  27. Tired vs. Drunk • Studies show that tired drivers are just as (or more) dangerous than drug or alcohol-impaired drivers on the road! • How many people in this room are: • drunk right now? • High on drugs? • Distracted? • How many of you are tired? • It is similar out on our roads. More people are tired than otherwise impaired or distracted.

  28. Symptoms of Fatigue • Inability to keep fixed attention • Impaired memory • Slower reaction time • Difficulty / slowness in reasoning • Weakness / tired muscles Do we need any of these things to drive safely?

  29. It’s best to never drive tired…. But what if you have to?

  30. Strategies for Driving While Fatigued • Avoid long drives • Avoid leaning forward • Keep your eyes moving • Let in fresh air • Change drivers regularly • Adjust in-car temperature (not too hot or cold) • Drink some caffeine • Take breaks to get out and stretch

  31. Bottom Lines Drowsy driving is dangerous to yourself and others on the road. Drowsy driving is similar to driving drunk or drugged. Drowsy driving must become as socially unacceptable as drunk driving. Support one another by promoting a good night’s sleep before a long drive, sharing driving duties if allowed, and being a good passenger and keeping the driver aware and awake.

  32. Aggressive Driving SpeedingRunning signs or lightsTailgatingWeaving in and out of trafficFailing to yield the right of wayCutting off other driversYelling or honking your horn at other drivers

  33. Road Rage When aggressive driving becomes violent it is road rage • Pursuing another vehicle in a chase • Leaving your car to confront another driver • Intentionally bumping or ramming another car. • Physically assaulting another driver • Using a car as a weapon • Displaying a weapon • Firing a gun or using another weapon

  34. Formula for Road Rage Increased cultural disrespect and selfishness + More Cars Less Space More Driver Interactions = Road Rage!

  35. At least 1,500 Americans are killed or seriously injured each year as a result of road rage incidents

  36. Self-Imposed Anxieties • “I’m going to be late if I don’t hurry up.” • “Why are these cars going so slow?” • “We’ll never make it.” • “If only I had gone a little faster, I could’ve made it.” • “Oh no! Red light!”

  37. Anger Containment Techniques • Don’t respond • Don’t engage • Don’t up the ante • Swallow your pride • Choose the road “less traveled” • What is there to prove, really?

  38. Dealing with Anger How will you respond?

  39. Reducing Driver Distractions Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  40. Driver Distractions • Each year, more than 40,000 people are killed in motor vehicle crashes and over three million are injured! • Research indicates that driver distraction is a contributing factor in more than 25% of all crashes Source: AAA Foundation Research

  41. DRIVER DISTRACTIONS- Outside the Vehicle • Bright vehicle lights • Billboards and signs • Driver being chased by police • Officer directing traffic • Animal in roadway (deer, dog, elk, etc. ) Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  42. DRIVER DISTRACTIONS- Outside the Vehicle • Sunrise, sunset • People in roadway (child, basketball game, crowd, etc) • Objects in the roadway (broken glass, garbage can, etc. holes) • Crash scene Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  43. DRIVER DISTRACTIONS- Inside the Vehicle • Eating or drinking • Other occupants in the vehicle • Moving object in vehicle • All actions involved with smoking can be a distraction Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  44. DRIVER DISTRACTIONS- Inside the Vehicle • Dialing, talking, texting or looking up information on a cell phone • Adjusting radio, cassette, or CD • Using device/object in the vehicle • Using vehicle devices or controls • Picking up a dropped object Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  45. Problems with Driver Distractions are not New • Some of the “old” distractions that continue to cause problems are children and babies, cigarettes, drinks, radios and audio players, and insects or bugs that find their way into the vehicle. Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  46. Problems with Driver Distractions are not New • Newer” distractions include GPS navigation systems, digital music, On-Star roadside assistance, and cell phones. Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  47. New Issue or Old Issue? • Driver Distractions from 1913-2010 1913 1930 1954 1983 2000 2010 Radios Mobile Phones Email, Internet, texting, etc. Windshield Wipers Drive-Up Windows MP3 and DVD players

  48. Driver Age Groups Distractions • Drivers under age 20 are more likely than older drivers to be identified as distracted at the time of their crash. • 20-29 year-olds use a cell phone frequently. • 30-49 year-olds eat and drink more often in the car. • 50 plus drivers are more distracted by outside objects and events. Photos courtesy of the AAA Foundation

  49. When Distractions Lead to Collisions • Distractions and inattention cause 68% of rear-end crashes. • Other typical crashes include backing up, making lane changes, and merging. Photo courtesy of the AAA Foundation