slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Resource Use and Ecotourism and their Effects upon the Environment: Is it worth the risk? PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Resource Use and Ecotourism and their Effects upon the Environment: Is it worth the risk?

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 16

Resource Use and Ecotourism and their Effects upon the Environment: Is it worth the risk? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 296 Views
  • Uploaded on

Resource Use and Ecotourism and their Effects upon the Environment: Is it worth the risk? Julie L. Turt EDN 506 October 10, 2005 http://www.conservationafrica.org/iye/iye-logo2.gif Ecotourism e·co·tour·ism (n.)

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Resource Use and Ecotourism and their Effects upon the Environment: Is it worth the risk?' - lotus


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Resource Use and Ecotourism and their Effects upon

the Environment:

Is it worth the risk?

Julie L. Turt

EDN 506

October 10, 2005

http://www.conservationafrica.org/iye/iye-logo2.gif

slide2

Ecotourism

e·co·tour·ism (n.)

Tourism involving travel to areas of natural or ecological interest, typically under the guidance of a naturalist, for the purpose of observing wildlife and learning about the environment (“Ecotourism”).

Tourism designed to raise public awareness of the environment, to sensitize travelers to nature and its processes, and to reduce negative impacts of human activities on natural areas (Issacs 2000).

slide3

What marine species are affected?

(http://www.public.iastate.edu/~jhigh/homepage/manatee.jpg)

http://www.earthtrust.org/wlcurric/gif/mauibig.gif

http://www.70south.com/resources/animals/seals/fur.jpg

http://www.victorialodging.com/whales/images/humpback-whale-victoria.jpg

slide4

Ecotourism Fast Facts

1970s: Emerged from conservationists in Latin America and Africa simultaneously (Honey 1999)

1980s: Gained support within the United States, and this trend continues to the present day

Fastest growing industry on the earth

9% annual growth rate(Issacs 2000)

slide6

Resource Use

rē'sôrs yūz (n.)

The utilization of an energy or a material source for industrial, commercial, or domestic purposes

It can be either sustainable or unsustainable

slide7

Sustainable Resource Use

sə-stā'nə-bəl rē'sôrs yūz (n.)

The utilization of an energy or a material source for industrial, commercial, or domestic purposes that is capable of being continued with minimal long-term effect on the environment

slide9

For Ecotourism:

  • Experience obtains advocates for the environment and its resources.
  • Guided tours enable the experience to be educational. Thus, education becomes a management tool.
  • Provides income for area.
  • Minimizes environmental impact.
slide10

Against Ecotourism:

  • Too large of a risk to the individual species, especially those “protected” by the Endangered Species Act (1973)
  • Damage to resources
  • Animals have lowered guard against human contact
  • May limit habitat if an animal feels threatened
slide11

Endangered Species Act

ĕn-dān'jərd spē'shēz ăkt (n.)

Legislative law that protects threatened organisms of a distinct population segment against extinction

http://www.hcn.org/allimages/1995/may15/graphics/950515.010.gif

slide12

Harassment

ha·rass'ment (n.)

“An intentional or negligent act or omission which creates the likelihood of injury to wildlife by annoying it to such an extent as to significantly disrupt normal behavioral patterns which include, but are not limited to, breeding, feeding, or sheltering” (Sullins 2001).

http://www.leapnonprofit.org/images/logo2.gif

slide13

Examples of Harassment

Harassment can cause physiological changes, altered behavior, and decreased survivorship.

“Better to let the wild animals stay wild than kill them with mistaken kindness”

- David Seideman, 1997

slide14

Marine Mammal Viewing Code of Conduct

1. Remain at least 100 yards from marine mammals. 2. Time spent observing individual(s) should be limited to 30 minutes.3. Whales should not be encircled or trapped between boats, or boats and shore.4. If approached by a whale, put the engine in neutral and allow the whale to pass.Federal law prohibits pursuit of marine mammals.Even if approached by a marine mammal:Do not offer the animal food, and do not touch or swim with the animal due to disease transmission and unpredictable behavior.

slide15

Resource Use and Ecotourism:

Good?

Bad?

YOU DECIDE

slide16

References

“Alaska Marine Mammal Viewing Guidelines and Regulations.” NOAA Fisheries. 20 Aug. 2003. 2 Oct. 2005. http://www.fakr.noaa.gov/protectedresources/mmv/guide.htm

"ecotourism." The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004. Answers.com GuruNet Corp. 02 Oct. 2005. http://www.answers.com/topic/ecotourism

Honey, M.S. 1999. Treading Lightly? Ecotourism’s Impact on the Environmnet. Environment,Vol. 41, No. 5, pp. 4-9.

Issacs, J.C. 2000. The Limited Potential of Ecotourism to Contribute to Wildlife Conservation. Wildlife Society Bulletin, Vol. 28, No. 1, pp. 61-69.

Seideman, David. 1997. Swimming with Trouble. Audubon, Vol. 99, pp. 76 – 82.

Sullins, Tony A. ESA: Endangered Species Act. USA: American Bar Association, 2001.