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Academic Reading Skills The Key to College Learning. Amy Woodbeck, PVCC Residential Reading Faculty Fall 2013. Language Context Understanding. … Comprehension. Learning Objectives. Develop … …an awareness of the unique qualities inherent in discipline-specific text, and

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Academic Reading Skills The Key to College Learning


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academic reading skills the key to college learning

Academic Reading SkillsThe Key to College Learning

Amy Woodbeck, PVCC Residential Reading FacultyFall 2013

learning objectives
Learning Objectives
  • Develop…
    • …an awareness of the unique qualities inherent in discipline-specific text, and
    • …learn to communicate these qualities effectively to students.
  • Learn Strategies…
    • …to use in class that will help all students – regardless of general reading skill-level - consume and comprehend discipline-specific text.
shared goal student success
Shared Goal: Student Success
  • Shared Intention:
    • To be clear
    • To lead students in their development of knowledge
    • To provide necessary information on which students can build
  • We do not intend to…
    • Confuse
    • Be unclear
    • Be mysterious or misleading
the rosetta stone the code book
The Rosetta Stone….the Code Book

The process of reading in any language

[read “any discipline”]

includes decoding and knowing how the symbols of the language are used together, plus knowing other [discipline-specific]

language rules.

Davidson, 2006, p. 14

the rosetta stone the code book1
The Rosetta Stone….the Code Book

Break the Code

Dihydrogen monoxide

Water

shared goal student success1
Shared Goal: Student Success
  • Shared Intention:
    • To be clear
    • To lead students in their development of knowledge
    • To provide necessary information on which students can build
  • We do not intent to…
    • Confuse
    • Be unclear
    • Be mysterious or misleading
  • Lexicon
    • The vocabulary of a language, an individual speaker or group of speakers, or a subject.
  • Nomenclature
    • Name designation
    • A system or set of terms or symbols especially in a particular science, discipline, or art.
the rosetta stone the code book2
The Rosetta Stone….the Code Book

Even good readers who are trying to read about a new or difficult subject go through a complex and often difficult process to learn the new content.

Davidson, 2006, p. 16

the problem1
The Problem…

Russian

Dutch

Spanish

Korean

English

the problem2
The Problem

Text Complexity…

slide14

Your students may be handcuffed by the complexity of your discipline’s text.

You hold the key to the content-area aspects of reading…

reading in academic disciplines
Reading in Academic Disciplines
  • Your academic identityhas developed over years of schooling.
  • Your discipline is your disciplinary preference.
  • You approach discipline-specific text with confidence.
  • You have internalized how to read your discipline-specific text.
  • You read these text through the lens of your discipline.

AND…

Buehl, 2011, p. 9

You are the best because….

reading in academic disciplines1
Reading in Academic Disciplines

Students face the sometime daunting challenge of being

competentreaders,

writers, and

thinkers

in allof the academic disciplines they are studying.

Buehl, 2011, p. 9

AND…

action steps
Action Steps

What you can do for your students…

action steps1
Action Steps

Know your students!

Know your textbook!

Frontload knowledge!

Model!

Know the purpose!

Discuss the text!

Personal Work!

action steps know your students
Action Steps - Know your students!
  • Success as readers may be stymied by lack of academic knowledge.
  • Authors assume that readers will already know part of what they need to comprehend the message communicated.
  • Many students have low access to academic knowledge in their out-of-school lives.
  • It is unlikely that individual students will be uniformly proficient or struggling readers across the curriculum.
  • Students need to become increasingly comfortable with the insider language of academic text; They need to talk-the-talk.
  • Building academic knowledge + sharing relevant prior knowledge are essential for comprehension of complex text.

Buehl, 2011, p. 119

action steps know your textbook
Action Steps - Know your textbook!
  • Textbook Structure: What your textbook has AND how you use it:
    • Preface
    • Table of Contents
    • Index
    • Glossary
    • Appendices
    • Chapters

Format and Features

If you are using OERs, know the structure and layout and facilitate students’ orientation to the structure, the connections, the links, and your expectations.

action steps frontload knowledge
Action Steps – Frontload Knowledge!
  • Review previous learning
  • Do not assume they remember
  • Use Quick Writes
  • Make meaningful associations

Buehl, 2011, pp 122-126

action steps model
Action Steps - Model!

Teacher Modeling:

Actively demonstrate how to:

  • Read the text
  • Question the text
  • Connect the text to other facets of your discipline

“ Effective teachers were more likely to teach a range of literacy skills and knowledge at the word, sentence, and text level through the context of a shared text.”

Fisher, Frey, & Lapp, 2009, p 5

action steps know the purpose
Action Steps – Know the Purpose!
  • Know – and explicitlycommunicate - the purpose for reading assignments - Students should be able to answer:
    • Why am I reading this?
    • What am I supposed to get out of it?
    • What do I need to do when I am done?
action steps discuss the text
Action Steps – Discuss the Text!
  • Discussion of the text enables you to:
    • Assess for understanding.
    • Ask reading-dependent questions.
    • Encourage the use of textual evidence to support and answer questions.
    • Deepen student comprehension through the use of analytical processes.
action steps personal work
Action Steps – Personal Work!
  • Reflect
  • Review your language
      • Colleague speak
      • Classroom speak
      • Conversational speak
  • Identify
      • Key phrases
      • Key words
      • Key names
references
References
  • Buehl, D. (2011). Developing Readers in the Academic Disciplines, Newark, DE: International Reading Association.
  • Davidson, C.L. (2006). Solving the Mystery of Reading, New York, NY: Pearson Longman.
  • Fang, Z. & Coatoan, S. (May 2013). Disciplinary Literacy – What You Want to Know About It, Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 56(8), May 2013. pp. 627-632.
  • Fisher, D., Frey, N., & Lapp, D. (2009). In a Reading State of Mind – Brain Research, Teacher Modeling, and Comprehension Instruction, Newark, DE: International Reading Association.
  • Fisher, D., Frey, N., & Lapp, D. (2012). Text Complexity – Raising Rigor in Reading,Newark, DE: International Reading Association.
  • Gallagher, K. (2004). Deeper Reading – Comprehending Challenging Text,Portland, ME: Stenhouse Publishers.
  • Kendeou, P. & Van den Broeck, P. (2007). The Effects of Prior Knowledge and Text Structure on Comprehension Processes During Reading of Scientific Text, Memory and Cognition, 35(7), 2007. pp 1567-1577.
  • Van den Broeck, P. & Kremer, K. (2000). The Mind in Action: What It Means to Comprehend During Reading, Newark, DE: International Reading Association.