slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
What is CHPS PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
What is CHPS

play fullscreen
1 / 18
Download Presentation

What is CHPS - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

linh
130 Views
Download Presentation

What is CHPS

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

    1.

    2. What is CHPS? A popular TV drama?

    3. Collaborative for High Performance Schools Charter Board Members California Energy Commission California Integrated Waste Management Board Pacific Gas and Electric Southern California Edison San Diego Gas and Electric Southern California Gas Company Sacramento Municipal Utility District Los Angeles Department of Water and Power CHPS is a not-for-profit California corporation. The organization was created by eight charter members, which continue to fund the organization. Other board members include the DOE, DSA, and OPSC. CHPS is a not-for-profit California corporation. The organization was created by eight charter members, which continue to fund the organization. Other board members include the DOE, DSA, and OPSC.

    4. Why Are High Performance Schools Important? Student health Published and anecdotal reports are exposing the poor indoor air quality of the states school facilities, and the potentially serious effects it can have on student health and absenteeism. Student Performance Educating students is the primary goal of schools, and well-designed school facilities can influence student performance. Operating Costs (Energy Efficiency) Not a new issue in California, but the continuing crisis reminds us how vulnerable we are. Districts spend $450 million annually on energy, and lose about 20% - 30% of it on poor design and old equipment. Costs will go up considerably. There a a number of reasons why HPS make sense. The first is student health and its relationship to ADA and funding. The second is student performance. The third is operating costs. There a a number of reasons why HPS make sense. The first is student health and its relationship to ADA and funding. The second is student performance. The third is operating costs.

    5. Other market issues solidify the importance of acting now. The California school system is big and growing. 1 in 8 children in America goes to school in California. California will build 100s of new schools to house 100,000 new students per year. California schools are old. Over 60% of Californias public schools are over 30 years old, and many are in need of repairs. Poor quality portables are becoming permanent. 1 in 3 classrooms in the state are portables. There are some other issues that underline the importance of HPS. There are some other issues that underline the importance of HPS.

    6. What is a high performance school? Healthy Thermally, visually and acoustically comfortable Energy, water and material efficient Protective of the natural ecosystem Easy to maintain and operate Buildings that teach Through a process of integrated design, daylighting, sustainable site planning and commissioning, we create schools that are health, comfortable, efficient, protective of the environment, easy and inexpensive to maintain and operate and have a lesson to convey to the students and teachers. Through a process of integrated design, daylighting, sustainable site planning and commissioning, we create schools that are health, comfortable, efficient, protective of the environment, easy and inexpensive to maintain and operate and have a lesson to convey to the students and teachers.

    7. The benefits of high performance schools simultaneously address a districts most pressing issues. Increased test scores Increased average daily attendance (ADA) Increased teacher satisfaction and retention Reduced operating cost (energy and water) Reduced liability Reduced environmental impact HPS simulataneously increase test scores, ADA, and teacher satisfaction, while reducing operating cost, liability and environmental impact. HPS simulataneously increase test scores, ADA, and teacher satisfaction, while reducing operating cost, liability and environmental impact.

    8. High performance design can be achieved within standard timelines. Timelines are short, but better design does not have to be a roadblock. Districts must identify their goals early and communicate them clearly with the design team. Hire design teams familiar with high performance design concepts. Your goals and design must be integrated early (and not require time - and money - intensive changes later). The CHPS Eligibility Criteria is a scoring system for identifying your high performance goals.

    9. CHPS Programs and Resources Best Practices Manual Process, Design Guidelines, and Eligibility Criteria Training Seminars to educate districts and designers Financial Programs by Charter Members Performance based grants and loans to help offset incremental costs. Demonstration Schools New schools showcase the value and feasibility of innovative designs. Material Specifications Testing, emissions, and resource efficiency standards for materials Value Added Services Design assistance, energy models, and audits. Educational Resources Tools to use energy and resource issues to support the core curriculum.

    10. Best Practices Manual Organization Volume I Planning Descriptive and process information for school districts, superintendents, board members, and others. Volume II Design Detailed technical information and guidelines for architects, engineers, school planners, contractors and other building professionals Volume III Criteria A flexible yardstick for measuring whether or not a school qualifies as high performance. Volume I addresses the needs of school districts, including superintendents, parents, teachers, school board members, administrators, and those persons in the school district that are responsible for facilities. These may include the Assistant Superintendent for Facilities (in large districts), buildings and grounds committees, energy managers, and new construction project managers. Volume I aims to describe why high performance schools are important, what components are involved in their design, and how to navigate the design and construction process to ensure that they are built. Volume II contains design guidelines for high performance schools. These are tailored for California climates and are written for the architects and engineers who are responsible for designing schools as well as the project managers who work with the design teams. Volume II is organized by design disciplines and addresses specific design strategies for high performance schools. Volume III is the CHPS Eligibility Criteria. These criteria are a flexible yardstick that precisely defines a high performance school so that it may qualify for supplemental funding, priority processing, and perhaps bonus points in the state funding procedure. School districts can also include the criteria in their educational specifications to assure that new facilities qualify as high performance. Volume I addresses the needs of school districts, including superintendents, parents, teachers, school board members, administrators, and those persons in the school district that are responsible for facilities. These may include the Assistant Superintendent for Facilities (in large districts), buildings and grounds committees, energy managers, and new construction project managers. Volume I aims to describe why high performance schools are important, what components are involved in their design, and how to navigate the design and construction process to ensure that they are built. Volume II contains design guidelines for high performance schools. These are tailored for California climates and are written for the architects and engineers who are responsible for designing schools as well as the project managers who work with the design teams. Volume II is organized by design disciplines and addresses specific design strategies for high performance schools. Volume III is the CHPS Eligibility Criteria. These criteria are a flexible yardstick that precisely defines a high performance school so that it may qualify for supplemental funding, priority processing, and perhaps bonus points in the state funding procedure. School districts can also include the criteria in their educational specifications to assure that new facilities qualify as high performance.

    11. Volume I : The Process Guide: know what to ask for

    12. Volume II: Design Goal To provide design professionals and project managers with detailed technical information about all aspects of high performance design. Contents General Conditions Site Planning Interior surfaces Electric Lighting Daylighting Building Envelope and insulation HVAC Other systems Volume II is written for architects and engineers who are responsible for designing schools, and for the project managers who work with the design teams. The design strategies presented in Volume II are organized according to eight design disciplines: general conditions; site planning; interior surfaces and furnishings; electric lighting and controls; daylighting and fenestration; building enclosure and insulation; HVAC (heating, ventilating and air-conditioning); and other equipment and systems. Applying these guidelines will result in schools that are healthy, comfortable, energy efficient, resource efficient, water efficient, safe, secure, adaptable and easy to operate and maintain. Volume II is written for architects and engineers who are responsible for designing schools, and for the project managers who work with the design teams. The design strategies presented in Volume II are organized according to eight design disciplines: general conditions; site planning; interior surfaces and furnishings; electric lighting and controls; daylighting and fenestration; building enclosure and insulation; HVAC (heating, ventilating and air-conditioning); and other equipment and systems. Applying these guidelines will result in schools that are healthy, comfortable, energy efficient, resource efficient, water efficient, safe, secure, adaptable and easy to operate and maintain.

    13. Volume III: Eligibility Criteria Explicitly defines a high performance school Easy to specify Menu of credits allows districts to highlight specific areas Flexible System of pre-requisites and credits 81 possible / 28 required Categories Site 14 points Water 5 points Energy 24 points Materials 11 points IEQ 17 points District 10 points

    14. Demonstration Schools