Balanced Literacy and Data Collection – Making Informed Instructional Decisions - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Balanced Literacy and Data Collection – Making Informed Instructional Decisions

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  1. Balanced Literacy and Data Collection – Making Informed Instructional Decisions Dr. Roseanne K. Meyer Calallen ISD April 3, 2009

  2. DATA, DATA, DATA What’s The Point?

  3. Remember when. . . . You were either a: Red Bird, Blue Bird, or a Black Bird and you never changed colors!

  4. New technology helps with disaggregation but it doesn’t replace the teacher and her ability to observe. . .

  5. TechieTools: • DMAC • INOVA • WEBCCAT • mCLASS

  6. Reasons Why We Need to Find Out What Students Know and Can Do • How do we intend to use the information obtained from assessments? • Informal example: listen in on paired work to determine whether or not learners need more practice with lesson. • Observations may be noted on a checklist • The results from this form of assessment are primarily intended for use by the teacher in order to determine if progress is on track and if more, or different, instruction is required. Daily diagnostic, running records, progress monitoring • {Excellent source for RTI documentation}

  7. Intervention ActivityThis activity helps students focus on the internal structure of a story while reading silently orally with a partner.. Characters: Who or what is the story about? Plot: What is the problem in the story? Setting: Where does the story take place? Time: When does the story take place? Resolution: How is the problem solved?

  8. Reasons Why We Need to Find Out What Students Know and Can Do • Formal assessment examples: TAKS, STAR, DRA, Benchmarks, 6 weeks assessments, etc. • Results can be tabulated as a grade or numerical record and used for documentation of progress • Results can be used statewide as documentation for accountability measures (i.e. ERI, ARI, AMI, TAKS,AYP, etc.) • Formal assessments are also tools for the classroom teacher and district staff to determine progress on a regular and consistent basis.

  9. First Determine. . . Purpose of Evaluation Collect Data Interpret Data Make Informed Instructional Decisions

  10. What does a Balanced Literacy Classroom Look Like?Components of a Balanced Literacy Classroom Reading Aloud • Provides adult model of fluent reading • Develops sense of story/text • Develops vocabulary • Encourages predictions • Builds a community of readers • Develops active listening

  11. Components of a Balanced Literacy Classroom Shared Reading • Demonstrates awareness of text • Develops sense of story or content • Promotes reading strategies • Develops fluency and phrasing • Increase comprehension • Encourages politeness and respect

  12. Components of a Balanced Literacy Classroom Guided Reading • Promotes reading strategies • Increases comprehension • Encourages independent reading • Expands belief in own ability

  13. Running Records and Anecdotal Notes

  14. Running Records and Anecdotal Notes

  15. Components of a Balanced Literacy Classroom Independent Reading • Encourages strategic reading • Increases comprehension • Supports writing development • Extends experiences with a variety of written texts • Promotes reading for enjoyment and information • Develops fluency • Fosters self-confidence by reading familiar and new text • Provides opportunities to use mistakes as learning opportunities

  16. Components of a Balanced Literacy Classroom Modeled/Shared Writing • Develops concepts of print • Develops writing strategies • Supports reading development • Provides model for a variety of writing styles • Models the connection among and • between sounds, letters, and words • Produces text that students can read independently • Necessitates communicating in a clear and specific manner

  17. Components of a Balanced Literacy Classroom Interactive Writing • Provides opportunities to plan and construct texts • Increases spelling knowledge • Produces written language resources in the classroom • Creates opportunities to apply what has been learned

  18. Components of a Balanced Literacy Classroom Independent Writing • Strengthens text sequence • Develops understanding of multiple uses of writing • Supports reading development • Develops writing strategies • Develops active independence

  19. And the results are. . .

  20. Use of Appropriate Assessment Tools • Observation checklists • Anecdotal notes • Running Records • Student portfolios • Teacher/student conference notes • Benchmarks • Site Word Lists • Journals • Rubrics

  21. Decision Making All for one and one for all. . . .

  22. Resources • TPRI Interventions • DRA • STAR • Lexiles • Dolch/Frye • A-Z • Reading Response Journals • PLDs (Not just for ELLS) • Rubrics

  23. Website Resources http://www.tea.state.tx.us/tchrtoolbag • http://www.lexile.com/DesktopDefault.aspx

  24. http://www.readinga-z.com/ • http://www.wgen.net/