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  1. Violent protests roman time machine By: Margaret Lyon

  2. Issues in Rome • In Rome, the issues with protests would spark into something very violent at times.Lots of times, women would use them as ways to voice themselves in government, where they had no real power. They would use this as a way to manipulate their opinions into government., almost like the suffragettes in America. Also, in the Conflict of the Orders, the plebeians went against the patricians, refusing to work for them until they had their say in the society. They left Rome and camped on a nearby hill. The patricians realized how much they really needed the plebeians, and they gave in. After nearly two hundred years, the plebeians had worked their way to almost completely equal government. Lots of the protests in Rome were related to political things. Sometimes they would be over things such as slavery and slave labor in the republic. These protests would sometimes involve going on strike, such as when the Chicago teachers went on strike last September. A large protest was one of the first protests in ancient Rome- overthrowing the Etruscans. The Romans had to, and they succeeded. They then morphed into the republic, gaining more and more power until they became an empire. Another protest was the three times that the slaves rebelled. These three protests were called the Servile wars, since the Latin word for “slave” is “servus.” The first one was called the First (Sicillian) Revolt, the second one was called the Second (Sicillian) Revolt, and the third was called the Revolt of Spartacus. The people protesting were prisoners who had been made slaves in the end of the second Punic Wars.

  3. Issues in our world today • Protests today are still very much related to politics, although women no longer have to spark protests for government rights. Recently, National Security was concerned that people might outbreak a protest and wreak havoc on the presidential inauguration on the 21st of this month. But there are protests all over involving our country. A while ago, a protest sparked up when Israeli troops broke into a West Bank apartment in a failed arrest raid. Protests here are still very serious as well. There are protests and controversy over things such as child abuse, gun laws and even animal testing rights. They are a large issue, although not much action has recently been taken against it. Sometimes they are small, but sometimes they can spark up large enough to kill people in the process.

  4. Solutions for Rome • I came up with a step by step plan to solve the protestation issues in Rome. They will create a solution that will hopefully solve things between the emperor and the people.

  5. Step one: arms and disguise • The guards for Rome should be more heavily armed. On the other hand, having these weapons up front might intimidate the people, so one tactic to avoid that would be to disguise these guards in typical Roman day to day outfits, and they would hide the weapons in their clothing. If a violent scene or protest were to break out not just near the emperor but anywhere, the guards could quickly stop it. This would also help stop the protests almost altogether, because once the citizens caught on to the fact that there were guards in the streets (there should be about five to a street) they wouldn’t know who was really just a citizen. Then these protests wouldn’t break out as much for fear of being caught and arrested.

  6. Step two: take precautions • As I’ve researched, I’ve found that the guards and people near the palace of the emperor and all over just didn’t think everything through. They had guards, but these guards weren’t taking simple precautions. The emperor being attacked was a huge threat in ancient Rome, and action needed to be taken to avoid that from happening. People would typically protest the emperor, demanding he be taken down from power, not wanting him in charge of them. Simple precautions can be taken to prevent this. One would be to simply arm guards and station one in every possible room that could be attacked. If people were to try to somehow break into the palace, then the guards could quickly stop them. Maybe another would be to have a hidden room that is easy to get to where the emperor could hide in case the guards couldn’t stop anyone coming in.

  7. STEP THREE: COMMUNICATION • This particular step isn’t easy to carry out. People in Rome, when protesting, were relentless and most of the time, refused to cope, depending on what the issue was. It was fighting fire with fire, and the people needed to be talked to in a more peaceful way than violence and killing. Being human, they had to be stubborn on some level, and they would refuse to listen at first. Beginning with a peaceful strategy can save a lot of conflict.

  8. BIBLIOGRAPHY • I received an e-mail with answers to a few questions from a professional, and those are posted on my wiki page. • http://www.exovedate.com/ancient_timeline_one.html • http://www.womeninworldhistory.com/lesson10.html • http://www.learntci.com/shared/sections/6650 • http://www.google.com/imgres?hl=en&safe=active&tbo=d&biw=1366&bih=600&tbm=isch&tbnid=mFDd641lhsBPHM:&imgrefurl=http://www.acrossrome.com/rome-half-day-sightseeing-ancient-rome/&docid=IZpICir0TmkMDM&imgurl=http://www.acrossrome.com/wp-content/gallery/6/1.jpg&w=800&h=600&ei=VNkFUevTK6Wz0QHGk4C4Aw&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=258&vpy=295&dur=1415&hovh=194&hovw=259&tx=164&ty=171&sig=103187721150560642444&page=1&tbnh=146&tbnw=197&start=0&ndsp=21&ved=1t:429,r:16,s:0,i:128 • http://www.google.com/imgres?hl=en&safe=active&tbo=d&biw=1366&bih=643&tbm=isch&tbnid=TP794lSfHDv4uM:&imgrefurl=http://thepassengertimes.com/2010/09/28/i-am-a-roman-citizen/&docid=3ezNs3i54VOItM&imgurl=http://nicolettalolli.files.wordpress.com/2010/09/spqr.jpg&w=500&h=261&ei=3NgFUYPFLIyc0gGxvIDQCQ&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=453&vpy=141&dur=70&hovh=162&hovw=311&tx=96&ty=84&sig=103187721150560642444&page=1&tbnh=136&tbnw=255&start=0&ndsp=28&ved=1t:429,r:3,s:0,i:89 • http://www.google.com/imgres?hl=en&safe=active&tbo=d&biw=1366&bih=600&tbm=isch&tbnid=dXx3VMlMycUDoM:&imgrefurl=http://arf.berkeley.edu/field-report/roman-art-and-archaeology-pearson&docid=Ic1o76hZ4MIAuM&imgurl=http://arf.berkeley.edu/sites/default/files/webfiles/all/arf/website/images/stahl_reports/pearson/fig3_nilemosaic.jpg&w=1626&h=1080&ei=r90FUfWpEYSU0QHo9IHQDg&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=751&vpy=128&dur=2238&hovh=183&hovw=276&tx=75&ty=83&sig=103187721150560642444&page=1&tbnh=130&tbnw=202&start=0&ndsp=23&ved=1t:429,r:4,s:0,i:92 • http://www.google.com/imgres?hl=en&safe=active&tbo=d&biw=1366&bih=600&tbm=isch&tbnid=LSd1XCROYO4d2M:&imgrefurl=http://karenswhimsy.com/ancient-rome.shtm&docid=5kmijA5Ty1yAyM&imgurl=http://karenswhimsy.com/public-domain-images/ancient-rome/images/ancient-rome-4.jpg&w=500&h=521&ei=at4FUbSQKa3y0wGngoFI&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=527&vpy=109&dur=28&hovh=229&hovw=220&tx=136&ty=98&sig=103187721150560642444&page=1&tbnh=138&tbnw=132&start=0&ndsp=21&ved=1t:429,r:3,s:0,i:89 • http://www.google.com/imgres?hl=en&safe=active&tbo=d&biw=1366&bih=600&tbm=isch&tbnid=qSu1KXebZjUMrM:&imgrefurl=http://karenswhimsy.com/ancient-rome.shtm&docid=5kmijA5Ty1yAyM&imgurl=http://karenswhimsy.com/public-domain-images/ancient-rome/images/ancient-rome-1.jpg&w=500&h=777&ei=t94FUYKhDuit0AGU54CwBg&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=813&vpy=207&dur=1079&hovh=280&hovw=180&tx=133&ty=118&sig=103187721150560642444&page=1&tbnh=138&tbnw=88&start=0&ndsp=21&ved=1t:429,r:11,s:0,i:113 • (The ones starting with “google” are all just images, because the website links weren’t working, but if you would go to the page you can go to the side and click on the website)

  9. Pleading the emperor to consider this plan, with images Persuasive statements to guide along these solutions

  10. Emperor, we need to stop these protests and unite as an empire once more

  11. If these solutions work, peace will be restored to Rome

  12. We need to solve this as quickly and professionally as possible

  13. if we follow these steps, we will be that much closer to restoring our powerful empire • Dear emperor, • My name is Margaret Lyon, and I am from the future. I hear you have had some problems with violent protests. As you can see in the provided solutions, we have options to rescue Rome. As you can see, this empire desperately needs all the help it can get. My entire team and I have come up with various solutions to solve all sorts of problems that are threatening this empire, although I have provided solutions for the issue of violent protesting. If you follow one or all of these steps, I guarantee you will see a level of improvement in the our empire is. Thank you ever so much for your time reading this letter, and I hope your empire will improve in the near future. • Sincerely, • Margaret Lyon