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Nationalism Ascendant Topic One 10/08/07 Period 2 APUSH Sarah, Jaron, Katie, Miriam, Abby, and Claire. During President Jefferson’s and Madison’s terms three significant decisions changed history, specifically American nationalism. Those three events consist of: Louisiana Purchase

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nationalism ascendant topic one 10 08 07 period 2 apush sarah jaron katie miriam abby and claire

Nationalism AscendantTopic One10/08/07Period 2APUSHSarah, Jaron, Katie, Miriam, Abby, and Claire

slide2
During President Jefferson’s and Madison’s terms three significant decisions changed history, specifically American nationalism. Those three events consist of:
  • Louisiana Purchase
  • Embargo Act (1807)/U.S. Tariff Policies
  • War of 1812
before louisiana purchase
Before Louisiana Purchase
  • Background Info:

- “Revolution of 1800”

- Jefferson’s Democratic-Republican win

  • America remained consistent between the two-party system by keeping Federalist regimes intact, as well as changing some to create better conditions from the common people.
  • These new accomplishments led to the desire to buy New Orleans from France in 1802-1803
what was it
What was It?
  • An agreement between America and France made by James Monroe and Robert R. Livingston.
  • James Monroe was originally sent to Paris, to delegate a deal to receive solely New Orleans for $10 million.
  • However, he bought trans-Mississippi River and New Orleans from France for $15 million on April 30th, 1803, nearly doubling land owned by the United States.
  • Why did Napoleon sell?
      • Yellow Fever Spread in France
      • French troops weakened
      • Santa Domingo lost
      • Wanted to prevent America

joining with Britain

effects on nationalism
Effects on Nationalism
  • Although exponential growth of the nation’s size gained pride, it also made it harder to control Americans.
  • Agriculture development
      • encouraged the rise of an industrial revolution, leading America towards prosperity.
  • Land growth resulted in opulence, which gained confidence in Americans shown through Nationalism.
significance
Significance
  • United States’ land investment allowed the nation to unite as a majority, and make final decisions.
  • Common economic ideals were spreading unanimously among Americans.
      • Further ideas were building in order to reach the economic goals.
  • Americans’ desire to become a powerful nation resulted in national pride and an emerging identity.
before the embargo act
Before the Embargo Act
  • After the Louisiana Purchase, Napoleon reentered war with Britain.
  • Britain dominated the ocean. Napoleon dominated the land.
  • Indirect economic conflicts between Britain and France put America in the middle.
        • Orders of Council, 1806
        • Seizure of American ships and U.S. Sailors
        • Chesapeake ship conflict, 1807
what were the embargo act and us tariffs
What were The Embargo Act and US Tariffs?
  • President Jefferson’s peaceful coercion to avoid war
  • The Embargo (1807) meant there were to be no American exports.
      • To prove France and Britain’s dependency on America’s raw materials
      • Thus, causing them to stop the seizure of American ships and citizens.
  • The repeal of the Embargo on May 1, 1809, lead to the Non-Intercourse Act which opened trade with all nations except France and Britain.
      • Temporary solution until 1810, when it expired.
  • Congress, under Madison passes the Macon Bill
      • American trade will reopen the British and French economy if Britain and France eliminated the commercial restrictions held on each other’s ports.
effects on nationalism9
Americans disliked the act

-ironically, united Americans because of their common struggle

-Americans did not want to seem overpowered by or dependent on, European trade.

America’s stubborn desire to be recognized as a power and to be respected for their neutrality helps create the nationalist image that can be seen in American culture today.

Effects on Nationalism
significance10
Significance

Embargo Act

  • The formation of industrial factories
  • Jefferson did more economic destruction to his own country than to Britain or France.
  • Rebirth in Federalism

US Tariff Policies

  • Congress realization of dependency on European trade
  • Loss of credibility to the American Congress
  • “Reality check”
background before war of 1812
Background before War of 1812
  • Jefferson’s presidency:
    • Embargo Act (1807)
    • Followed by Non-Intercourse Act (1809)
  • Madison’s presidency:
    • Macon’s Bill Number 2 (1810)
      • Removed all trade restrictions
      • Asked England and France to remove trade laws
      • Would reinstate embargo on the one that did not
commonly believed causes
Commonly Believed Causes
  • War Hawks
    • Members of House of 12th Congress
    • War advocates
      • Indian violence on frontier
      • Territorial expansion
      • More indirectly, national honor.
  • Impressment
    • British forcing U.S. sailors into Royal Navy
the war
The War
  • Congress declares war June 18, 1812
  • Major events of war:
    • America advances first on Canada, defeated.
    • British strategy to blockade coast and raid.
    • Napoleonic Wars end, British send veterans
      • “Bladensburg races”
      • Burning of Washington
    • Plattsburg U.S. victory (defending New York)
    • New Orleans U.S victory (Andrew Jackson)
effects on nationalism15
Effects on Nationalism
  • U.S. did not officially win, yet nor did they lose.
  • “Not one inch of territory ceded or lost.”
  • War forces union: sectionalism weakened.
  • Pride in American industrialism.
  • Rebuild Washington with sense of pride.
significance16
Significance
  • “America’s second War for Independence”
    • Established respect for nation.
    • Friendly relations with British.
  • Democratic-Republican “experiment” passed test of war.
  • Precursor to both “Era of Good Feelings” and the Panic of 1819.
conclusion
Conclusion
  • It is proven that:
    • Louisiana Purchase
        • Expansion of land, resulting in economical growth through agriculture and trade which gained power for America, increasing nationalism.
    • Embargo Act & Tariff Policies
        • American’s dependency on European trade was initiated and taxes were reinstated in order to increase economy as manufacturing grew and America’s national power.
    • War of 1812
        • Fight for American’s “independence”, to prevent foreign abuse, which resulted in national pride as American prospered through defeats.
works cited page
Works Cited Page
  • “1816-1860: The Second American Party System and the Tariff.” Tax History Museum.
  • "Aaron Burr." Historic Valley Forge. 1998. Independence Hall Association. 4 Oct. 2007 <http://www.ushistory.org/valleyforge/served/burr.html>.
  • Barry, James P. "Louisiana Purchase." 1994. Gateway New Orleans. 30 Sept.-Oct. 2007
  • <http://www.gatewayno.com/history/LaPurchase.html>.
  • Cerami, Charles A. Jefferson's Great Gamble. Naperville: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2003. 261-268.
  • Chesapeake conflict. [Online image] Available http://www. cache.eb.com/eb/ image?id=716&rendTypeId=4.October 5, 2007.
  • Dawson, Samuel E. Hand Book for the Dominion of Canada. Dawson Brothers, 2006. 06 Oct. 2007 <http://books.google.com/books?id=KALK5MoIvOsC&dq=canada+marching+jefferson>.
  • Embargo Act 1807 Cartoon [Online image] Available http://www.us-coin-values-advisor.com, October 6, 2007.
  • Finding, John E. Thackeray, Frank W.. The Unfinished Nation. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1999.
  • Harrison, Maureen. Gilbert, Steve. Thomas Jefferson in his own words. New York: Barnes n Noble Books, 1996.
  • Jefferys, C. W. The Battle of Lundy's Lane. Government of Ontario Art Collection, Ontario. 05 Oct. 2007<http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/ENGLISH/exhibits/1812/big/big_001_lundysbattle.htm >.
  • Louisiana Purchase Map. French Creoles. French Creoles of America. 2 Oct. 2007 <www.frenchcreoles.com/LouisianaPurchaseMap.jpg>.
  • Miller, Hunter. Treaties and Other International Acts of the United States of America. Vol. 2. Washington: Government Printing Office, 1996. The Avalon Project Yale Law School. 30 Sept. 2007 <http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/diplomacy/france/louis1.htm>.
  • Richmond, Jim. American Flag. 2006. Yuba City, CA, Yuba City. Valley Metal Forge. Zen Cart. 04 Oct. 2007 <www.valleymetalart.com/images/American-Flag-Wall>.
  • "The Louisiana Purchase Treaty." PBS. 2001. The West Film Project. 30 Sept. 2007 <http://www.pbs.org/weta/thewest/resources/archives/one/louispur.htm>.