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LA Coastal Protection and Restoration Reports to Congress What is “Category 5” Protection?. Rebuilding the New Orleans Region Forum September 2006. Overview of Presentation. The New Orleans setting and coastal challenges Hurricane Katrina Congressional Direction to the Corps of Engineers

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slide1

LA Coastal Protection and Restoration Reports to CongressWhat is “Category 5” Protection?

Rebuilding the New Orleans Region Forum

September 2006

slide2

Overview of Presentation

  • The New Orleans setting and coastal challenges
  • Hurricane Katrina
  • Congressional Direction to the Corps of Engineers
  • Defining a “Category 5” storm
  • Engineering challenges
  • Need for engineering innovations
  • Coastal lines of defense strategy
  • Options for Protecting New Orleans
  • Questions
slide4

New Orleans

Lake Pontchartrain

Lake

Borgne

Mississippi River

Breton and Chandeleur Sounds

Barataria

Bay

Gulf of Mexico

slide6

Federal

Federal Non-COE

Non-Federal

Existing New Orleans Area

Hurricane Protection

slide8

Category 3

127 mph wind

27.17 inches central pressure

15 mph forward speed

90 miles – extent of hurricane force winds

230 miles – extent of tropical force winds

Katrina at LA Landfall

slide11

I-10 “twin spans”

Orleans Parish, LA

slide12

Highway39

Plaquemines Parish, LA

slide13

Rail Road in marsh

Orleans Parish, LA

slide15

17th Street Canal

Orleans Parish, LA

slide16

Bayou Bienvenue Floodgate

St. Bernard Parish, LA

slide17

Gulf Intracoastal Waterway

Orleans Parish, LA

slide19

Chalmette

St. Bernard Parish, LA

slide20

Chalmette

St. Bernard Parish, LA

slide24

Fort Pike at The Rigolets

Orleans Parish, LA

slide26

Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2006 (P.L. 109-148)

SEC. 5009. Public Law 109–103 amended as follows…

  • …Chief of Engineers, is directed to conduct a comprehensive hurricane protectionanalysis and design at full federal expense to develop and present a full range of flood control, coastal restoration, and hurricane protection measures exclusive of normal policy considerations…
  • …submit a preliminary technical report for comprehensive Category 5 protection within 6 months…
  • …submit a final technical report for Category 5 protection within 24 months
  • …consider providing protection for a storm surge equivalent to a Category 5 hurricane within the project area and may submit reports on component areas of the larger protection program for authorization as soon as practicable…
  • …analysis shall be conducted in close coordination with the State of Louisiana and its appropriate agencies.

Proctor Point

St. Bernard Parish, LA

key project directives
Key Project Directives
  • Fully coordinate with the State of Louisiana
  • Reports to Congress and state Master Plan should be complimentary
  • Use the best and brightest talents from within the USACE and from external entities
  • Use innovative designs and technologies
  • Involve and educate the public

Stone Island

Breton Sound, LA

slide28

Team Composition

  • USACE-MVN, USACE-MVD, USACE-ERDC
  • USACE Planning Centers of Expertise
  • State of Louisiana, Coastal Protection & Restoration Authority, LDNR, LDOTD, LDWF, LDEQ
  • LSU, UNO, Tulane, Notre Dame, Univ North Carolina, Univ Maryland, Univ Delaware, MIT
  • NOAA Hurricane Center, NMFS, EPA, USFWS, USGS, NRCS
  • Dutch Reijkwaterstat
  • Oceanweather, HDR, Group Solutions, others
independent review teams
Technical Review

Occurs within USACE outside of MVN

Employs USACE Centers of Expertise

Embedded technical managers and reviewers on PDT for continuous input

Peer Review

Conducted outside of USACE

Review team member identities not known for preliminary effort

Exploring options for bringing onboard National Academy for final review

Independent Review Teams
slide31

Standard Project Hurricane

  • Derived by the National Weather Service in 1957
  • Central Pressure: 27.5 inches of Mercury
  • Wind Speed: 110 mph
  • Radius of Maximum Winds: 30 miles
  • Forward Speed: 5 – 11 knots

Lake Pontchartrain and

Vicinity HPP

Central Press (in)

Scale

Number

Winds

(mph)

Surge

(feet)

1

2

3

4

5

Camille

28.9

28.5 - 28.9

27.9 – 28.5

27.2 – 27.9*

< 27.2

26.6

74 – 95

96 – 110*

111 - 130

131 – 155

>155

200

4-5

6-8

9-12*

13-18

> 18

24.6

West Bank and

Vicinity, N.O. HPP

*SPH Design

SPH PROJECTS

slide32

Scale Number

Winds (mph)

1

74 – 95

Project Location

Date Authorized

Central Pressure Index

Wind

Forward Speed

2

96 -110

Speed

AtRadius

of

3

111 – 130

Lake Pontchartrain & Vicinity

October 1965

27.6 inches

100 mph

34.5 miles

5.75 – 12.66 mph

4

131 – 155

5

155 +

Grand Isle & Vicinity

1965 – 1976

28.15 inches

87 mph

35 miles

13 mph

Category 3

New Orleans to Venice

October 1962

28.1 inches

90 mph

34.5 miles

11 mph

127 mph wind

27.17 inches central pressure

West Bank & Vicinity

1986

27.4 inches

115 mph

34.5 miles

12.6 mph

15 mph forward speed

90 miles – extent of hurricane force winds

230 miles – extent of tropical force winds

Authorized Protection Levels

Saffir-Simpson Scale (1970)

Design Hurricanes

Katrina at LA Landfall

Congress currently authorizes protection from flood waters resulting from winds of 90-115 MPH.

slide33

Developing a Design Storm

  • Saffir-Simpson is a wind damage scale
  • Storm surge is not well calibrated in scale
  • Storm characteristics and strike probabilities are key to defining protection strategy and design levels
  • Computer simulations to aid design
  • Future trends in climate and sea levels
  • Developing long-term risk reduction strategy
slide34

Screening Storms

  • Probable Maximum Hurricane
  • Maximum Possible Hurricane
  • Minimal “Category 5“ event
  • Hurricane Katina type storm
  • 100 year storm
storm tracks evaluated probable maximum hurricane pmh
Storm Tracks EvaluatedProbable Maximum Hurricane (PMH)

Storm comparisons Hurricane Katrina Hurricane Camille Probable Max Hurricane

Central pressure 920 mb 908 mb 890 mb

Max sustained winds landfall 127 mph 160 mph 166 mph

Radius to max winds 30 NM 10 NM 11 NM

Forward speed 14 knots 14 knots 10 knots

*represents work completed to date by LACPR team

slide37

Design Challenges

  • Coast in collapse
  • Community recovery timelines
  • Battling nature’s most powerful storms
  • Extreme engineering conditions
  • Innovative technologies & interconnected systems
slide39

Category 5 Protection Strategies

  • Coastal lines of defense
  • Structural barriers
  • Evacuation plans
  • Local building codes
slide40

Options for New Orleans

  • Open tidal channels and higher levees
  • Barriers at Pontchartrain tidal channels
  • Low barriers ar tidal channels that allow overtopping during peak storm conditions
  • South shore levees with no overtopping
  • Restore coastal features
slide41

LACPR primary

alignment alternative

LACPR additional

alignment alternative

MRGO/GIWW navigable

closure potential alignment

Required levee lifts

BARRIER PLANS

*NOTE – additional LACPR alignments in development

slide42

No overtopping

Block surges

Restore Wetlands Buffers

Surge transfer

slide43

Concluding Comments

  • Invite continuous involvement of the engineering community
  • Recovery and survival of New Orleans depends upon hurricane protection works
  • Wind thresholds
  • Reduce system complexity
  • Strong Houses Resist Storms
  • Varying levels of protection
  • Comprehensive approach
slide44

QUESTIONS?

Gregory Miller

Project Manager(504) 862-2310Gregory.B.Miller@usace.army.mil

http://www.mvn.usace.army.mil/

SW Pass Light

MS River delta

slide46

Planning and Design Workshops

  • Wind, Waves and Water (Dec 2005 Vicksburg, MS)
    • Held to develop state of the science for estimating maximum hurricane for design comparison and analysis
    • Included National Hurricane Center, LSU and Dutch
  • Initial Plan Formulation (Feb 2006 Lafayette, LA)
    • Assembly of coastal professionals to develop initial alternative alignments for model runs & public presentation at scoping meetings
  • Engineering Technical Approaches and Innovations (Mar 2006 Vicksburg, MS)
    • Experts in various design fields to assess alternatives and apply both standard and innovative approaches to assist the team in preparation of information gathering plans and tools for analysis

Stone Island

Breton Sound, LA

preliminary technical report
Report completed in July 2006

Outlines strategic approach

Identifies key components

Highlights remaining work needed to develop full plan

Preliminary Technical Report