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110 FORCE PROTECTION FUNDAMENTALS
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110 FORCE PROTECTION FUNDAMENTALS

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  1. 110 FORCE PROTECTION FUNDAMENTALS

  2. 110.1 Purpose of Antiterrorism and Force Protection • Antiterrorism (AT) is defensive measures used to reduce the vulnerability • Falls under the overarching Force Protection and Combating Terrorism programs. • AT program is a collective effort that seeks to reduce the likelihood that Department of Defense affiliated personnel, their families, facilities, and materiel will be subject to a terrorist attack, and to prepare to respond to the consequences of such attacks should they occur. • .

  3. 110.1 Purpose of Antiterrorism and Force Protection • Force Protection (FP) is security programs designed to protect: • Service members • Civilian employees • Family members • Facilities • Information • Equipment

  4. 110.2 Describe the following Force Protection Conditions FPCON CONDITIONS (FPCONs): A DoD-approved system standardizing the Department's identification, recommended preventive actions, This system is the principal means for a commander to apply an operational decision. Military commanders or DoD civilians exercising equivalent authority may implement additional FPCON measures from higher FPCONs on their own authority Subordinate military commanders or DoD civilians exercising equivalent authority at any level may not lower a FPCON

  5. 110.2 Describe the following Force Protection Conditions FPCON CONDITIONS (FPCONs): FPCON NORMAL Applies when a general global threat of possible terrorist activity exists and warrants a routine security posture. Measure NORMAL 1. Secure and randomly inspect buildings, rooms, and storage areas not in regular use. Measure NORMAL 2. Conduct random security spot checks of vehicles andpersons entering facilities under the jurisdiction of the United States. Measure NORMAL 3. Limit access points for vehicles and personnel commensurate with a reasonable flow of traffic.

  6. 110.2 Describe the following Force Protection Conditions FPCON ALPHA applies when there is an increased general threat of possible terrorist activity against personnel or facilities, the nature and extent of which are unpredictable, ALPHA measures must be capable of being maintained indefinitely. However, it may be necessary to implement selected measures from higher FPCONs resulting from intelligence received as a deterrent. Measure ALPHA 1 – 10

  7. 110.2 Describe the following Force Protection Conditions FPCON BRAVO applies when an increased or more predictable threat of terrorist activity exists. Sustaining BRAVO measures for a prolonged period may affect operational capability and relations with local authorities. Measure BRAVO 1 – 20

  8. 110.2 Describe the following Force Protection Conditions FPCON CHARLIE applies when an incident occurs or intelligence is received indicating some form of terrorist action or targeting against personnel or facilities is likely. Implementation of CHARLIE measures will create hardship and affect the activities of the unit and its personnel. Measure CHARLIE 1 – 15

  9. 110.2 Describe the following Force Protection Conditions FPCON DELTA applies in the immediate area where a terrorist attack has occurred or when intelligence has been received that terrorist action against a specific location or person is imminent. Normally, this FPCON is declared as a localized condition. FPCON DELTA measures are not intended to be sustained for substantial periods. Measure Delta 1 – 12

  10. 110.2 Describe the following Force Protection Conditions CURRENT MNC-I FPCONs: Combat Zone – CHARLIE + DELTA 4, 5, & 6 Modified.

  11. 110.3 Deadly Force Definition:That force which a person uses with the purpose of causing death or serious bodily harm or which a reasonable and prudent person would consider likely to create a substantial risk of causing death or serious bodily harm. -In self-defense and defense of others -In defense of property involving national security -In defense of property not involving national security but inherently dangerous to others -To prevent or interrupt serious offenses against persons -Apprehension or arrest -Escape -Lawful order

  12. 110.4 Less Then Lethal Force Using Less Then Lethal Force: Security/LE personnel are often armed with weapons or equipment other than firearms. Even Though their intended purpose is non-lethal, when applied, they could cause death or serious bodily harm. Less then lethal methods provide alternatives to firearms and increase options for the use of minimum force. Examples: handcuffs, batons, military working dogs, chemical spray, vehicles.

  13. 110.5 Discuss your unit’s standard operating procedures to deter terrorism against yourself and your unit. Appendix 15 to Annex C TO OPERATIONS ORDER 01-06 (OPERATION IRAQ FREEDOM 05-07) (U)| Establishes MNF-W policies and procedures, assigns responsibilities and provides guidance and information for Force Protection (FP) to reduce the vulnerability of personnel, resources and facilities to terrorist and other hostile acts.

  14. 110.6 Discuss the rules of engagement as it relates to force protection. “JP 1-02 (DoD Dic) rules of engagement — Directives issued by competent military authority that delineate the circumstances and limitations under which United States forces will initiate and/or continue combat engagement with other forces encountered”.

  15. 110.6 Less Then Lethal Force- (Cont.) Escalation of Force (EOF): Use the minimum amount of force necessary to decisively eliminate the threat. If time and circumstances permit, use the following degrees of force when responding to hostile act or hostile intent. Shout – Verbal warniing to halt – “KIFF” Show – your weapon and demonstrate intent to use it Shove – or use other non-deadly means to command complaince Shoot – to eliminate the threat

  16. 110.7 Discuss the use of rear area security as it relates to force protection and rules of engagement. • Commanders have an inherent responsibility for the security of their personnel, equipment, and facilities. • The component commander and the MAGTF commander are ultimately responsible for the security of their assigned rear areas.   • In the rear area, security objectives include: • Preventing or minimizing disruption of support operations. • Protecting personnel, supplies, equipment, and facilities. • Protecting LOCs. • Preventing or minimizing disruption of command and control. • Defeating,  containing,  or  neutralizing  any  threat  in the rear area.

  17. 110.7 Cont. • Commanders employ both active and passive measures to provide  security.   • Active  measures  include  organizing  for defensive operations, coordinating reconnaissance and surveillance, providing security to convoys, positioning air defense units in the rear area, establishing liaison with fire support organizations, employing close air support, establishing reaction forces, developing defensive plans and positioning assets in support of them, patrolling, and training in defensive skills.   • Passive  measures  include  camouflage, dispersion, and cover. Security operations in the rear area require detailed planning and aggressive execution.  

  18. 110.7 Cont. • Types of security operations include • Populace and resource control operations. • Enemy prisoner of war operations. • Noncombatant evacuation operations. • Civilian control operations. • Area damage control operations. • Combat operations.

  19. Questions?