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Materials Needed Chart paper that outlines characteristics of a fable Tree Thinking Map. Learning Objective : Describe the structural characteristics of fables. RC 3.1. What are identifying today?. Define the structural characteristics of fables. Partner Share.

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slide1

Materials Needed

  • Chart paper that outlines characteristics of a fable
  • Tree Thinking Map
what are identifying today
What are identifying today?

Define the structural characteristics of fables.

partner share
Partner Share

Discuss with your partner a movie that you have seen that included talking animals.

fable
Fable

A fable is a highly imaginative folktale. It usually has talking animals other supernatural forms. Stories usually teaches a lesson or has a moral or tell how something came into being. Theses stories were once told orally and have been written down for all to enjoy! Trickster tales are considered fables.

Example: Aesop Fables

Non-Example: Junie B Jones

why is it important to know structural characteristics of fable
Why is it important to know structural characteristics of fable?

It will help us to become better readers by strengthening our comprehension.

the tortoise and the hare

Read the text.

Ask yourself, “Does it have talking animals?”

“Does it teach a lesson/ moral or tell how something came into being

The Tortoise and the Hare

A HARE one day ridiculed the short feet and slow pace of the Tortoise, who replied, laughing: 'Though you be swift as the wind, I will beat you in a race.' The Hare, believing her assertion to be simply impossible, agreed to the proposal; and they agreed that the Fox should choose the course and fix the goal. On the day appointed for the race the two started together. The Tortoise never for a moment stopped, but went on with a slow but steady pace straight to the end of the course. The Hare, lying down by the wayside, fell fast asleep. At last waking up, and moving as fast as he could, he saw the Tortoise had reached the goal, and was comfortably dozing after her fatigue.

identifying structural patterns of a fables
Identifying structural patterns of a fables.
  • Read the text.
  • Ask yourself, “Does it have talking animals?”
  • “Does it teach a lesson/ moral or tell how something came into being

Aesop Fable: Turtle and Hare

  • Turtle and rabbit decided to race against each other
  • Hare took a break in the race

Turtle did not stop or give up

Slow and steady wins the race

Haresaid he would beat turtle

-Hareand Turtle

race

the wolf and the crane

Read the text.

Ask yourself, “Does it have talking animals?”

“Does it teach a lesson/ moral or tell how something came into being

The Wolf and the Crane

The Wolf and the Crane A Wolf had been gorging on an animal he had killed, when suddenly a small bone in the meat stuck in his throat and he could not swallow it. He soon felt terrible pain in his throat, and ran up and down groaning and groaning and seeking for something to relieve the pain. He tried to induce every one he met to remove the bone. "I would give anything," said he, "if you would take it out." At last the Crane agreed to try, and told the Wolf to lie on his side and open his jaws as wide as he could. Then the Crane put its long neck down the Wolf's throat, and with its beak loosened the bone, till at last it got it out. "Will you kindly give me the reward you promised?" said the Crane. The Wolf grinned and showed his teeth and said: "Be content. You have put your head inside a Wolf's mouth and taken it out again in safety; that ought to be reward enough for you." Gratitude and greed go not together.

identifying structural patterns of a fables10
Identifying structural patterns of a fables.
  • Read the text.
  • Ask yourself, “Does it have talking animals?”
  • “Does it teach a lesson/ moral or tell how something came into being

Aesop Fable: The Wolf and the Crane

Crane removed the bone and asked for a reward

  • Wolf asked crane to help him remove the bone
  • Crane agreed and place

Gratitude and Greed don’t go together

Wolf and Crane

Wolf had a bone stuck in his throat

closure
Closure

Once when a Lion was asleep a little Mouse began running up and down upon him; this soon wakened the Lion, who placed his huge paw upon him, and opened his big jaws to swallow him. "Pardon, O King," cried the little Mouse: "forgive me this time, I shall never forget it: who knows but what I may be able to do you a turn some of these days?" The Lion was so tickled at the idea of the Mouse being able to help him, that he lifted up his paw and let him go. Some time after the Lion was caught in a trap, and the hunters who desired to carry him alive to the King, tied him to a tree while they went in search of a wagon to carry him on. Just then the little Mouse happened to pass by, and seeing the sad plight in which the Lion was, went up to him and soon gnawed away the ropes that bound the King of the Beasts. "Was I not right?" said the little Mouse.

What did we learn today?

What are the characteristics or elements of a fables?

Why is it important to know?