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  1. Androscoggin Ranger Station Native Plant Pollinator Garden on the White Mountain National Forest Androscoggin Ranger Station Native Plant Pollinator Garden on the White Mountain National Forest Title text here 2010 Accomplishments The Androscoggin Ranger Station is situated on Route 16 in Gorham, NH at the foot of the Mount Washington and the Presidential Range of the White Mountains. It’s proximity to one of the main attractions in the White Mountain National Forest make it a highly visited location. The Native Plant Pollinator Garden Project entered its second and final year in 2010. This year the renovations involved further removal of existing non-native species and the installation of locally native species. In 2010, botany program and district staff installed dozens of native grasses, sedges and wildflowers in areas where non-native species were removed both in 2009 and 2010. Additionally more than 30 balled and burlaped shrubs (primarily highbush blueberry) were added to last years wildlife plantings. Large interpretive (24” by 30”) panels inform visitors on the importance and value of woodland wildflowers and pollinators and meadow plants and pollinators. Additional individual plant labels containing the common and scientific name, common pollinators, and native range were installed to inform visitors of the new species that were planted. A small automatic irrigation system was also installed to help reduce the maintenance time by district personnel. As with native plant gardens in other locations on the White Mountain National Forest, the changes have been immediately noticed by both visitors and local pollinators. The compliments of the visitors on the beauty and diversity of the gardens are frequent.. Many visitors have also commented on the number of pollinators that use the garden. Some pollinators were so anxious to use the garden they were pollinating wildflowers before we could get them out of the pot and into the ground. New plantings in front of the Androscoggin Ranger District Office • Year Awarded: 2010 • Project completion: 2010 • Report number: 2 of 2 • Expenditures: • FY 2009 total funding - $53,000 • FY 2009 Androscoggin Garden funding – $15,519 • Site Prep/Staff - $5820.00 • Materials – $9399.00 • Interpretation – $300.00 • Contractors, Partners, Cooperators • Clements Nursery • The Dirt Doctors • Contact: Chris Mattrick • 603-536-6225 • cmattrick@fs.fed.us • Images by Lesley Rowse and Jennifer Mattrick New installed highbush blueberry White Mountain National Forest 71 White Mountain Drive Campton, NH 03223 Butterflyweed (Asclepiastuberosa)

  2. White Mountain Native Plant Pollinator Wetland Garden White Mountain National Forest Native Plant Pollinator Gardens at the Administrative Complex Title text here 2010 Accomplishments In 2009, a wetland native plant pollinator garden was installed in a storm water detention wetland at the White Mountain National Forest Administrative Complex where the Pemigewasset Ranger District and Supervisor’s Office are co-located. In 2010, this area was filled with a diversity of native plants that attracted a wide variety of pollinators. In the autumn of 2010 this area is continuing to provide valuable habitat and forage for local and migrant birds. In 2010, work began to create a garden linkage between the visitor’s center entrance along a serpentine walkway past the wildflower meadow to the wetland garden created last year. The connection of these two areas directly adjacent to the visitor center provides an excellent teaching opportunity, as well as a connected landscape containing a variety of species and structure for local pollinators and other wildlife. The planting of thicket forming shrubs in this area reduces the need for mowing or traditional landscape maintenance requirements The majority of plant material installed in 2010 was shrubs and small trees including various species of Viburnum, dogwood, and shadbush. Additional species included high and low bush blueberry, meadowsweet, witchazel, huckleberry, and chokeberry, as well as various asters and goldenrods. All plants were acquired from local nurseries and are of regionally genetic material. Interpretive panels produced by the New England Wild Flower Society were installed to enhance the visitor experience and small plant labels identify each species common and scientific name as well as its native range and local pollinators. Native Plant Gardens begin to take shape in front of WMNF Administrative Complex • Project awarded 2010 • Report number: 1 of 2 • Project expenditures • FY 2010 funding: 53,000.00 • FY2010 WMAC funding: 34,728.42 • Staff/site preparation: $7,171.00 • Materials: $26,140.62 • Interpretation: $1416.80 • Contractors, Partners, Cooperators • Clements Nursery • The Dirt Doctors • New England Wild Flower Society • Contact: • Christopher Mattrick, Forest Botanist • 603-536-6225 • cmattrick@fs.fed.us • All images by Christopher Mattrick Swamp mallow (Hibiscus moscheutosssp. moscheutos) Red chokeberry (Aroniaarbutifolia) in fruit Stiff aster (Ionactislinariifolius) in bloom In the WMAC entrance gardens White Mountain National Forest 71 White Mountain Drive Campton, NH 03223