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Ryan Braley Chief Architect Mention. A faster horse: A look at big data from a game industry perspective. There is no such thing as data-driven design today. Ultimately, big data is about analytics. Harsh reality: Cost of question > value of answer.

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Ryan Braley Chief Architect Mention


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    1. Ryan Braley Chief ArchitectMention

    2. A faster horse:A look at big data from a game industry perspective

    3. There is no such thing as data-driven design today.

    4. Ultimately, big data is about analytics.

    5. Harsh reality:Cost of question > value of answer

    6. Vanity metrics:What is my funnel?Meaningful:Why is my game fun?

    7. 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 1. Know-how It is difficult to know which questions to ask, and if you’re not asking the right questions you will never get the right answers. 3. Cost It is expensive to ask questions about behavior. Several departments need to collaborate to answer a question, and a single question can take hours or days to answer. The cost per question today can exceed thousands of dollars. 2. Technology Companies only track what is easy to track, because it is difficult to interrogate the data. Many meaningful questions need a PhD. What’s wrong with analytics?

    8. “That ship has sailed.”

    9. Four costly compromises: 3.2 Data ingestion You need to make sure that the data sent from the device and game code matches with the model expected by the server. Every meaningful change to your data model breaks old reports by default.Compromise: Historical data vs. Flexibility 3.4 Human costs An advanced analytics stack requires a whole lot of expertise, maintenance and responsibility.Compromise: Silos vs. Education 3.3 Database(s) Different databases are built for different kinds of questions, and require different skillsets and languages.Compromise: Performance, Scalability or Accessibility? 3.1 Data models Every question begins in your game code. You need foresight and lots of code to get it right. Compromise: Early release vs. robust analytics

    10. Insight:Most common first purchase is a weapon. Insight:Early losses lead to leaving the game. “Do vanity items lead to losing the game?”

    11. Analytics has to ask about DB models CEO / Employee frames a problem Form hypothesis Formulate question to validate hypothesis Systems Team responds to Analytics Analytics Team executes query Analytics debugs results from query Send question to Analytics Department Analytics generates report from results Analytics Department reports back Employee gains insight from report Employee gains insight from report There is no such thing as data-driven design today.

    12. …We need analytical software much more powerful and much easier to use than the current state of the art. Most analytical platforms are exceedingly arcane, requiring lengthy experience with that exact platform to acquire mastery, and yet the quality of analysis remains fairly poor. It does society no good to collect huge amounts of data that only a small minority can analyze, and even then only partially.

    13. Thank you (we’re hiring)