Warmup 10 11
Download
1 / 26

Warmup 10/11 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 70 Views
  • Uploaded on

Warmup 10/11. Why do you think people do not vote?. Part II. Voting and Elections. In the past what types of people were denied the right to vote?. Women Native Americans African Americans Non-property holders. Today what are the requirements to vote in most states?. 18 years old

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Warmup 10/11' - kassia


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Warmup 10 11
Warmup 10/11

  • Why do you think people do not vote?


Part ii

Part II

Voting and Elections


In the past what types of people were denied the right to vote
In the past what types of people were denied the right to vote?

  • Women

  • Native Americans

  • African Americans

  • Non-property holders


Today what are the requirements to vote in most states
Today what are the requirements to vote in most states? vote?

  • 18 years old

  • US Citizen

  • Registered (except N. Dakota)

  • Convicted felons must have served time


How did each of the following expand suffrage right to vote
How did each of the following expand vote?suffrage (right to vote)?

  • 15th Amendment – all males can vote

  • 19th Amendment – all women can vote

  • 23rd Amendment – residents of Washington D.C. get 3 electoral votes

  • 24th Amendment – no poll tax, poor can vote

  • Voting Rights Act of 1965 – literacy tests prohibited

  • 26th Amendment – 18 years and older can vote

  • Voting Rights Language Assistance Act – use of bilingual ballots


What are the steps to voting
What are the steps to voting? vote?

  • Register: National Voter Registration Act “Motor Votor Bill” allows people to register when getting drivers license

    • To register for the first time you need proof of citizenship, address and age


Steps to voting
Steps to Voting vote?

2. Go to you polling place – location where voting is carried out – in your precinct – your voting district

3. Get a ballot – list of candidates

4. Step up to voting booth or machine and vote


How can citizens who cannot get to their polling place vote
How can citizens who cannot get to their polling place vote? vote?

  • Absentee Ballot – must be asked for in advance, marked and returned to election board before Election Day


How is a winner determined in an election
How is a winner determined in an election? vote?

  • Election workers count votes and take ballots and results, called returns to the election board for verification.


Exit polls
Exit Polls vote?

  • Media try and predict winners by asking (polling) voters on how they voted

  • Criticisms – may influence outcome by influencing those who have not voted yet


Why do some people not vote
Why do some people not vote? vote?

  • Do not meet state requirements

  • Feel no candidate represents their feelings

  • Feel their vote will not make a difference

  • Apathy – lack of interest


Warmup 2
Warmup vote?#2

  • What do you think when you see a campaign ad on TV?


What are the different techniques used in campaigning for office
What are the different techniques used in campaigning for office?

  • Canvassing – party members go door to door asking for votes

  • Advertising – allow party to present only its candidate’s position and attack an opponent without response

  • Propaganda – an attempt to promote a particular person or idea


Propaganda techniques
Propaganda Techniques office?

  • The Bandwagon

  • Glittering Generality

  • Stacked Cards

  • Transfer

  • Just Plain Folks

  • Name Calling

  • Endorsement


Paying for campaigns
Paying for campaigns office?

  • “There are four parts to any campaign. The candidate, the issues….., the campaign organization, and the money. Without the money you can forget the other three.”

    • Former House Speaker Tip O’Neill


How much do campaigns cost
How much do campaigns cost? office?

  • Every four years American spend more than

  • $3 BILLION a year on national, state, and local elections.


How do the candidates raise the money
How do the candidates raise the money? office?

  • Money comes from:

  • Private Citizens

  • The Government

  • Corporations and Interest Groups

  • Political Action Committees – (PACs) Organizations set up by Interest Groups and Corp. to raise money for candidates


Federal election campaign act feca
Federal Election Campaign Act office?(FECA)

  • Established to place control on how much individuals and groups could give to candidates.

  • WHY?


Feca characteristics pages 308 309
FECA Characteristics office?Pages 308-309

  • Created the FEC (Federal Election Commission)

  • Independent agency of the executive branch to administer campaign laws and watch spending


Limited contributions
Limited Contributions office?

  • In order to keep corruption out of elections

  • Cannot limit candidates own money (1st Amendment)


Presidential election campaign fund
Presidential Election Campaign Fund office?

  • allows taxpayers to designated $3 of taxes to set up public fund for Presidential candidates


What is the difference between soft money and hard money
What is the difference between office?soft money and hard money?

  • Hard Money – money given directly to candidate for campaign; limited

  • Soft Money – money given to political parties for general purposes; was unlimited


What is an incumbent
What is an office?incumbent?

  • Politicians who have already been elected to office


Why would incumbents be reluctant to pass campaign reform laws
Why would incumbents be reluctant to pass campaign reform laws?

  • Because most PACs give their money to incumbents


What did the mccain feingold act do to restrict campaign financing
What did the McCain-Feingold Act do to restrict campaign financing?

  • Prohibits raising soft money in national campaigns

  • Puts time restrictions on broadcasting political adds

  • Raised the limits on hard money for campaigns


What trends are likely to come about in campaign financing in the future
What trends are likely to come about in campaign financing in the future?

  • Focus on many small donations rather than large

  • Use of internet to campaign