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The Different Buddhist Traditions. The Different Buddhist Traditions. One of the results of the Buddhist Second Council which took place about 100 years after the Buddha’s passing (c. 386 BCE), was the Great Schism of Buddhism.

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the different buddhist traditions2

The Different Buddhist Traditions

One of the results of the Buddhist Second Council which took place about 100 years after the Buddha’s passing (c. 386 BCE), was the Great Schism of Buddhism.

The Buddhist Order formally split into two sects generally known as the Sthaviravadins (forerunners of Theravada and the Mahasanghikas (forerunners of the Mahayana).

the different buddhist traditions3

The Different Buddhist Traditions

One of the results of the Buddhist Second Council which took place about 100 years after the Buddha’s passing (c. 386 BCE), was the Great Schism of Buddhism.

The Buddhist Order formally split into two sects generally known as the Sthaviravadins (forerunners of Theravada and the Mahasanghikas (forerunners of the Mahayana).

the different buddhist traditions4

The Different Buddhist Traditions

Theravada means the “Teachings of the Elders”.

Mahayana means the “Great Vehicle”.

The demeaning term “Hinayana” or “Lesser Vehicle” was used by the early Mahayana to elevate themselves above Theravada. It has negative connotations and is seldom used nowadays.

the different buddhist traditions5

The Different Buddhist Traditions

Theravada means the “Teachings of the Elders”.

Mahayana means the “Great Vehicle”.

The demeaning term “Hinayana” or “Lesser Vehicle” was used by the early Mahayana to elevate themselves above Theravada. It has negative connotations and is seldom used nowadays.

the different buddhist traditions6

The Different Buddhist Traditions

Theravada means the “Teachings of the Elders”.

Mahayana means the “Great Vehicle”.

The demeaning term “Hinayana” or “Lesser Vehicle” was used by the early Mahayana to elevate themselves above Theravada. It has negative connotations and is seldom used nowadays.

theravada

Theravada

The earliest available teachings of the Buddha are in the Pali language, which is used by the Theravadins.

These teachings were brought to Sri Lanka at the time of the Third Council (c. 250 BCE) where they took root, and despite several difficult periods, remain intact till today. Theravada Buddhism is also the main religion of Thailand, Burma and Cambodia.

theravada8

Theravada

The earliest available teachings of the Buddha are in the Pali language, which is used by the Theravadins.

These teachings were brought to Sri Lanka at the time of the Third Council (c. 250 BCE) where they took root, and despite several difficult periods, remain intact till today. Theravada Buddhism is also the main religion of Thailand, Burma and Cambodia.

theravada11

Theravada

Although the Sangha may belong to different sects in their countries, the teachings are essentially homogenous with insignificant, if any, differences at all.

Theravada Buddhism is currently enjoying a growing popularity in countries like Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Australia and other Western countries due to the easier availability of English language materials and teachings and the internet.

theravada12

Theravada

Although the Sangha may belong to different sects in their countries, the teachings are essentially homogenous with insignificant, if any, differences at all.

Theravada Buddhism is currently enjoying a growing popularity in countries like Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Australia and other Western countries due to the easier availability of English language materials and teachings and the internet.

mahayana

Mahayana

Mahayana comprises a great variety of schools of Buddhism found in China, Japan, Korea and Tibet.

These schools originated in India after the Second Council and developed from new ideas within Buddhist thought as well as incorporating some Brahministic, Hindu and other concepts.

mahayana14

Mahayana

Mahayana comprises a great variety of schools of Buddhism found in China, Japan, Korea and Tibet.

These schools originated in India after the Second Council and developed from new ideas within Buddhist thought as well as incorporating some Brahministic, Hindu and other concepts.

mahayana15

Mahayana

As Buddhism spread to China around the 1st century CE, it also absorbed elements of Taoism and Confucianism in order to survive and adapt to the local culture and society.

When Buddhism spread to Tibet in the 7th century CE, it already had Indian Tantric influences and also absorbed elements of the local Bon religion.

mahayana16

Mahayana

As Buddhism spread to China around the 1st century CE, it also absorbed elements of Taoism and Confucianism in order to survive and adapt to the local culture and society.

When Buddhism spread to Tibet in the 7th century CE, it already had Indian Tantric influences and also absorbed elements of the local Bon religion.

mahayana19

Mahayana

Mahayana developed new concepts, in particular the Bodhisattva ideal, which they then formulated into new sutras and attributed them to the Buddha.

These sutras, such as the Lotus Sutra, Heart Sutra, Diamond Sutra, Amitabha Sutra, etc. usually originated in the Sanskrit language and formed the basis of the Mahayana teachings.

mahayana20

Mahayana

Mahayana developed new concepts, in particular the Bodhisattva ideal, which they then formulated into new sutras and attributed them to the Buddha.

These sutras, such as the Lotus Sutra, Heart Sutra, Diamond Sutra, Amitabha Sutra, etc. usually originated in the Sanskrit language and formed the basis of the Mahayana teachings.

mahayana21

Mahayana

One of the defining sutras in Mahayana is the Lotus Sutra (1st century CE) where the Buddha for the first time, is seen as a god-like father figure, as opposed to an enlightened human spiritual teacher.

The Arahant ideal of early Buddhism was also downgraded to below that of the Bodhisattva ideal, a new concept of Mahayana Buddhism.

mahayana22

Mahayana

One of the defining sutras in Mahayana is the Lotus Sutra (1st century CE) where the Buddha for the first time, is seen as a god-like father figure, as opposed to an enlightened human spiritual teacher.

The Arahant ideal of early Buddhism was also downgraded to below that of the Bodhisattva ideal, a new concept of Mahayana Buddhism.

mahayana23

Mahayana

There are several major schools of the Mahayana tradition :

Chan / Zen Buddhism

Pureland / Amitabha Buddhism

Vajrayana / Tibetan Buddhism

mahayana24

Mahayana

There are several major schools of the Mahayana tradition :

Chan / Zen Buddhism

Pureland / Amitabha Buddhism

Vajrayana / Tibetan Buddhism

mahayana25

Mahayana

There are several major schools of the Mahayana tradition :

Chan / Zen Buddhism

Pureland / Amitabha Buddhism

Vajrayana / Tibetan Buddhism

mahayana26

Mahayana

There are several major schools of the Mahayana tradition :

Chan / Zen Buddhism

Pureland / Amitabha Buddhism

Vajrayana / Tibetan Buddhism

mahayana27

Mahayana

Chan / Zen Buddhism :

The establishment of Chan is traditionally credited to the Indian prince-turned-monk Bodhidharma around the 5th century CE.

The aim of Chan / Zen is to discover the Buddha-nature within each person, through meditation and mindfulness of daily experiences. It does not place emphasis on written and verbal teachings.

mahayana28

Mahayana

Chan / Zen Buddhism :

The establishment of Chan is traditionally credited to the Indian prince-turned-monk Bodhidharma around the 5th century CE.

The aim of Chan / Zen is to discover the Buddha-nature within each person, through meditation and mindfulness of daily experiences. It does not place emphasis on written and verbal teachings.

mahayana31

Mahayana

Pureland / Amitabha Buddhism :

This is based on the Pure Land Sutras, brought to China in the 2nd century CE and is a "faith"-oriented branch of Buddhism.

It is very popular in East Asia, originally among the peasants, as it provides an alternative and “easier” route to enlightenment.

mahayana32

Mahayana

Pureland / Amitabha Buddhism :

This is based on the Pure Land Sutras, brought to China in the 2nd century CE and is a "faith"-oriented branch of Buddhism.

It is very popular in East Asia, originally among the peasants, as it provides an alternative and “easier” route to enlightenment.

mahayana33

Mahayana

Amitabha Buddha :

Amitabha Buddha means the Buddha of “Boundless Light” or “Infinite Life” and is the main Buddha of the Pure Land sect.

They believe that he resides in Sukhavati, the Western Paradise of Eternal Bliss, or simply the Pure Land, which he created through his infinite merits when he was a Bodhisattva named Dharmakara.

mahayana34

Mahayana

Amitabha Buddha :

Amitabha Buddha means the Buddha of “Boundless Light” or “Infinite Life” and is the main Buddha of the Pure Land sect.

They believe that he resides in Sukhavati, the Western Paradise of Eternal Bliss, or simply the Pure Land, which he created through his infinite merits when he was a Bodhisattva named Dharmakara.

mahayana35

Mahayana

Amitabha Buddha :

They believe that Nirvana has become too difficult to attain on our own, and that only through devotion to Amitabha that can one be reborn in the Pure Land, from which enlightenment is guaranteed.

A central practice is the concentrated and heartfelt repetitive recitation of “Namo Amitabha Buddha” or “Namo Amituofo”.

mahayana36

Mahayana

Amitabha Buddha :

They believe that Nirvana has become too difficult to attain on our own, and that only through devotion to Amitabha that can one be reborn in the Pure Land, from which enlightenment is guaranteed.

A central practice is the concentrated and heartfelt repetitive recitation of “Namo Amitabha Buddha” or “Namo Amituofo”.

mahayana40

Mahayana

Vajrayana / Tibetan Buddhism :

The earliest documented influence of Buddhism in Tibet dates from the 7th century CE. Its teachings includes Tantras which are orally-transmitted esoteric rituals or meditation practices.

In Vajrayana, such teachings cannot be understood and should not to be practiced without the guidance of a guru.

mahayana41

Mahayana

Vajrayana / Tibetan Buddhism :

The earliest documented influence of Buddhism in Tibet dates from the 7th century CE. Its teachings includes Tantras which are orally-transmitted esoteric rituals or meditation practices.

In Vajrayana, such teachings cannot be understood and should not to be practiced without the guidance of a guru.

mahayana43

Mahayana

Vajrayana / Tibetan Buddhism :

The goal of Vajrayana is to become a Buddha / Bodhisattva not only for one's own sake, but to help all other sentient beings also attain enlightenment and be free from Samsara and suffering.

Buddhas and Bodhisattvas can manifest on earth, eg. the Dalai Lama is the manifestation of Avalokiteshvara.

mahayana44

Mahayana

Vajrayana / Tibetan Buddhism :

The goal of Vajrayana is to become a Buddha / Bodhisattva not only for one's own sake, but to help all other sentient beings also attain enlightenment and be free from Samsara and suffering.

Buddhas and Bodhisattvas can manifest on earth, eg. the Dalai Lama is the manifestation of Avalokiteshvara.

mahayana45

Mahayana

Vajrayana / Tibetan Buddhism :

Four main schools :

Nyingma

Kagyu

Sakya

Gelug

mahayana46

Mahayana

Vajrayana / Tibetan Buddhism :

Four main schools :

Nyingma

Kagyu

Sakya

Gelug

trikaya or three bodies

Trikaya or Three Bodies

Nirmanakaya / Transformation BodyThe physical body that appears in the world to teach and liberate others.

Sambhogakaya / Reward BodyIt is the bliss of enlightenment and the reward of spiritual practice.

Dharmakaya / Truth BodyEmbodies the Dharma and principles of enlightenment. It is the Buddha nature without limits, boundaries or distinctions.

trikaya or three bodies50

Trikaya or Three Bodies

Nirmanakaya / Transformation BodyThe physical body that appears in the world to teach and liberate others.

Sambhogakaya / Reward BodyIt is the bliss of enlightenment and the reward of spiritual practice.

Dharmakaya / Truth BodyEmbodies the Dharma and principles of enlightenment. It is the Buddha nature without limits, boundaries or distinctions.

trikaya or three bodies51

Trikaya or Three Bodies

Nirmanakaya / Transformation BodyThe physical body that appears in the world to teach and liberate others.

Sambhogakaya / Reward BodyIt is the bliss of enlightenment and the reward of spiritual practice.

Dharmakaya / Truth BodyEmbodies the Dharma and principles of enlightenment. It is the Buddha nature without limits, boundaries or distinctions.

trikaya or three bodies52

Trikaya or Three Bodies

Nirmanakaya / Transformation BodyThe physical body that appears in the world to teach and liberate others.

Sambhogakaya / Reward BodyIt is the bliss of enlightenment and the reward of spiritual practice.

Dharmakaya / Truth BodyEmbodies the Dharma and principles of enlightenment. It is the Buddha nature without limits, boundaries or distinctions.

mahayana54

Mahayana

Kuan Yin :

Kuan Yin or Guanyin is short for Guanshi'yin which means "Observing the Cries of the World".

As the Goddess of Mercy, she is very popular among Chinese Buddhists as the protector of women and children, the saviour of those who are in trouble and is the personification of unconditional love, mercy and compassion.

mahayana55

Mahayana

Kuan Yin :

Kuan Yin or Guanyin is short for Guanshi'yin which means "Observing the Cries of the World".

As the Goddess of Mercy, she is very popular among Chinese Buddhists as the protector of women and children, the saviour of those who are in trouble and is the personification of unconditional love, mercy and compassion.

mahayana56

Mahayana

Kuan Yin :

She likely originated from Avalokiteśvara (her male form), the Bodhisattva who vowed to help all sentient beings in times of difficulty, and postpone his own Buddhahood until he has assisted all beings to attain Nirvana.

Also known as Chenrezig in Vajrayana, and Kannon in Japan.

mahayana57

Mahayana

Kuan Yin :

She likely originated from Avalokiteśvara (her male form), the Bodhisattva who vowed to help all sentient beings in times of difficulty, and postpone his own Buddhahood until he has assisted all beings to attain Nirvana.

Also known as Chenrezig in Vajrayana, and Kannon in Japan.

mahayana60

Mahayana

Maitreya :

Maitreya (Sanskrit) or Metteyya (Pali), is supposed to be the future Buddha of this world and the successor to our current Gotama Sakyamuni Buddha.

He is said to be in the Tusita Heaven where all future Buddha’s reside before their last birth on earth. Maitreya will come after the teachings of the current Buddha have disappeared completely.

mahayana61

Mahayana

Maitreya :

Maitreya (Sanskrit) or Metteyya (Pali), is supposed to be the future Buddha of this world and the successor to our current Gotama Sakyamuni Buddha.

He is said to be in the Tusita Heaven where all future Buddha’s reside before their last birth on earth. Maitreya will come after the teachings of the current Buddha have disappeared completely.

mahayana64

Mahayana

Ksitigarbha Bodhisattva :

Also known as Ti-Tsang Wang P'usa or ‘Earth Store’ Bodhisattva,Ksitigarbha is one of the 4 principal Bodhisattvas of Mahayana Buddhism, with Manjusri, Samantabhadra and Avalokitesvara.

He is known for his great vow :

“If the Hells are not empty

I will not attain Buddhahood.”

mahayana65

Mahayana

Ksitigarbha Bodhisattva :

Also known as Ti-Tsang Wang P'usa or ‘Earth Store’ Bodhisattva,Ksitigarbha is one of the 4 principal Bodhisattvas of Mahayana Buddhism, with Manjusri, Samantabhadra and Avalokitesvara.

He is known for his great vow :

“If the Hells are not empty

I will not attain Buddhahood.”

mahayana68

Mahayana

Laughing Buddha :

The Laughing Buddha, or Pu-Tai, has no association with the current Buddha but emerged from Chinese folklore based on a Chinese monk who later revealed himself as an incarnation of Maitreya.

Known in Japan as Hotei, rubbing his belly is thought to bring good luck, happiness and prosperity.

mahayana69

Mahayana

Laughing Buddha :

The Laughing Buddha, or Pu-Tai, has no association with the current Buddha but emerged from Chinese folklore based on a Chinese monk who later revealed himself as an incarnation of Maitreya.

Known in Japan as Hotei, rubbing his belly is thought to bring good luck, happiness and prosperity.

mahayana72

Mahayana

Medicine Buddha :

Bhaisajyaguru is the Buddha of healing and medicine depicting a doctor who cures the illness of suffering using the medicine of his teachings.

It is believed that he resides in the Eastern Pure Land and is usually seen holding a lapis-lazuli jar of medicine nectar in his left hand.

mahayana73

Mahayana

Medicine Buddha :

Bhaisajyaguru is the Buddha of healing and medicine depicting a doctor who cures the illness of suffering using the medicine of his teachings.

It is believed that he resides in the Eastern Pure Land and is usually seen holding a lapis-lazuli jar of medicine nectar in his left hand.

the different buddhist traditions75

The Different Buddhist Traditions

At the World Buddhist Sangha Council in Sri Lanka in 1966, the "Unifying Points" between Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism were unanimously endorsed.

For example :

The Buddha is the only Master.

Refuge is taken in the Buddha, the Dharma, and the Sangha.

the different buddhist traditions76

The Different Buddhist Traditions

At the World Buddhist Sangha Council in Sri Lanka in 1966, the "Unifying Points" between Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism were unanimously endorsed.

For example :

The Buddha is the only Master.

Refuge is taken in the Buddha, the Dharma, and the Sangha.

the different buddhist traditions77

The Different Buddhist Traditions

At the World Buddhist Sangha Council in Sri Lanka in 1966, the "Unifying Points" between Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism were unanimously endorsed.

For example :

The Buddha is the only Master.

Refuge is taken in the Buddha, the Dharma, and the Sangha.

the different buddhist traditions78

The Different Buddhist Traditions

To develop unconditional compassion for all living beings; and to realize the Ultimate Truth.

Acceptance of the 4 Noble Truths, 3 Characteristics of Existence, Dependent Origination.

Acknowledge differences in beliefs and practices, customs and habits which should not be confused with the essential teachings of the Buddha.

the different buddhist traditions79

The Different Buddhist Traditions

To develop unconditional compassion for all living beings; and to realize the Ultimate Truth.

Acceptance of the 4 Noble Truths, 3 Characteristics of Existence, Dependent Origination.

Acknowledge differences in beliefs and practices, customs and habits which should not be confused with the essential teachings of the Buddha.

the different buddhist traditions80

The Different Buddhist Traditions

To develop unconditional compassion for all living beings; and to realize the Ultimate Truth.

Acceptance of the 4 Noble Truths, 3 Characteristics of Existence, Dependent Origination.

Acknowledge differences in beliefs and practices, customs and habits which should not be confused with the essential teachings of the Buddha.

the different buddhist traditions81

The Different Buddhist Traditions

While the approach and practices may differ, the core Buddhist doctrines remain the same among the various traditions. 

Therefore, the various traditions can be considered merely as different routes to the same destination. 

We should thus support and assist each other along this route as much as possible.

the different buddhist traditions82

The Different Buddhist Traditions

While the approach and practices may differ, the core Buddhist doctrines remain the same among the various traditions. 

Therefore, the various traditions can be considered merely as different routes to the same destination. 

We should thus support and assist each other along this route as much as possible.

the different buddhist traditions83

The Different Buddhist Traditions

While the approach and practices may differ, the core Buddhist doctrines remain the same among the various traditions. 

Therefore, the various traditions can be considered merely as different routes to the same destination. 

We should thus support and assist each other along this route as much as possible.

slide84
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www.justbegood.net