Initiation of Methadone During Incarceration and
Download
1 / 3

BACKGROUND - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 83 Views
  • Uploaded on

Initiation of Methadone During Incarceration and Linkage to Treatment Upon Release N. Zaller , M. McKenzie, A. Parikh, P. Friedmann , T. Green, S. Dickman , J. Rich. BACKGROUND More than 200,000 active opiate users pass through a correctional facility in the United States each year

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'BACKGROUND' - judd


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Background

Initiation of Methadone During Incarceration and Linkage to Treatment Upon ReleaseN. Zaller, M. McKenzie,A. Parikh, P. Friedmann, T. Green, S. Dickman, J. Rich

BACKGROUND

  • More than 200,000 active opiate users pass through a correctional facility in the United States each year

  • Methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) is a widely available and effective pharmacological treatment for opiate addiction

  • A tremendous opportunity exists to engage the interconnected epidemics of addiction and incarceration.

    STUDY AIM

  • To determine whether initiating MMT prior to release from incarceration is an effective strategy for reducing drug use, increasing drug treatment retention, and reducing HIV risk behaviors.

    DESIGN

  • 3-arm, randomized trial examining methadone initiation prior to release and linkage to MMT post-release (Arm 1) as compared to linkage to MMT post-release (Arm 2) and referral only to MMT post-release (Arm 3). Arms 1 and 2 received payment for MMT in the community for up to 24 weeks.

    SETTING

  • Rhode Island Department of Corrections (RIDOC), USA

    STUDY POPULATION

  • 90 male and female prisoners with a DSM-IV diagnosis of opioid dependence

    OUTCOMES

  • Self-reported overdose, drug use, and criminal involvement

    ANALYSIS

  • Chi-square or Fisher’s exact tests, t-tests or Mann Whitney U


Background

Initiation of Methadone During Incarceration and Linkage to Treatment Upon ReleaseN. Zaller, M. McKenzie,A. Parikh, P. Friedmann, T. Green, S. Dickman, J. Rich

RESULTS

  • Assessments at 6 months were completed on 62 participants (70% follow-up)

  • Arm 1 participants were more likely to enter MMT treatment post release, entered treatment more quickly, and were more likely to be in treatment at six months

  • Six month self-report data indicate that participation in treatment significantly decreased illicit opiate use and other illicit drugs

  • Of the 16 individuals who started methadone while incarcerated:

    • Tworeported experiencing an overdose during the follow up period

    • Onereported any use of opiates or drug injection at 6 months follow up

  • Of the 30 individuals who started methadone post-release

    • 5 (16.7%) reported experiencing an overdose during the follow up period

    • 19 (63.3%) reported heroin use and 13 (43.3%) reported drug injection


Background

Initiation of Methadone During Incarceration and Linkage to Treatment Upon ReleaseN. Zaller, M. McKenzie,A. Parikh, P. Friedmann, T. Green, S. Dickman, J. Rich

LIMITATIONS

  • Small sample size; however, the large estimated effect sizes are notable

    CONCLUSIONS

  • Initiating methadone prior to release from incarceration and continuing treatment in the community are both feasible and can reduce drug use.

  • Providing methadone treatment for prisoners prior to release is a promising strategy to decrease post incarceration HIV risk behaviors, as well as reduce drug use, criminal behavior, and recidivism

For more information, please contact jrich@lifespan.org www.prisonerhealth.org