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Transit-Oriented Development in Boston

Transit-Oriented Development in Boston

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Transit-Oriented Development in Boston

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  1. Transit-Oriented Development in Boston A Presentation for the National Community Development Association Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA June 2007

  2. Historical Background Boston is known as “America’s Walking City” • Compact size and density make walking an effective mode of transit. • Boston has 7th highest percentage of pedestrian commuters in US (Cambridge, MA is highest). • First subway in the US: Tremont Street Subway opened in 1897 (precursor to Green Line)

  3. Historical Background • 1947 new Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) formed and took over streetcars, subways elevated railways and bus operations, served 14 adjacent cities and towns. • 1964 Metropolitan Boston Transit Authority (MBTA) formed, serving 78 cities and towns. • 1987 Washington Street elevated replaced by Southwest Corridor (subway, commuter rail), reducing rapid transit service to Roxbury. • 1999 MBTA expanded to 175 cities and towns

  4. Quick Facts • MBTA averages 1.1 million passenger trips every workday. • Subway averages about 600,000 trips every workday. • No. of lines:13 commuter rail, 5 light rail, 4 subway, 3 trolleybus, 4 ferryboat, 183 bus • Boston ranks 3rd in transit’s market share for commuting (33%). Washington, DC is 1st. • MBTA has its own song, “Charlie on the MTA”, recorded by Kingston Trio in 1959

  5. TOD in Boston: context • Almost all of Boston is within ¼ mile of a transit station • MBTA coordinates/collaborates with City on renovations to existing stations and construction of new stations, makes MBTA land available. • $30 million TOD Infrastructure and Housing Support Bond Program for pedestrian improvements, bicycle facilities, design, housing projects and parking facilities • $10 million Commercial Area Transit Node Housing Program

  6. TOD Projects in Boston • 1973 EPA parking freeze @ 1973 levels plus 10% • 51,000 spaces in 1977, grew only 9% to 59,100 in 1997. Boston has 2nd most expensive parking in US – NYC is 1st • Many T-stops are located within one of Boston’s 19 Main Streets neighborhood commercial revitalization districts

  7. TOD Projects • Mattapan Square Station (Red Line) • Bartlett Yards at Dudley Station (Bus and Silver Line) • Fairmount Line (Commuter Rail): upgrade Uphams Corner & Morton Street stations, possible 4 new stations at Newmarket, Four Corners, Talbot Ave and Blue Hill Ave. • Maverick Station (blue line) HOPE-VI • Ashmont Station (Red Line)

  8. Ashmont TOD Project • Located at Peabody Square in Ashmont Neighborhood of Dorchester. • Redevelopment of station and surface parking lot into 6 story, 190,000 s.f. mixed-use building • 116 housing units (72 affordable rental, 42 market rate condos), 10,000 s.f. of neighborhood retail, 80 underground parking spaces • Funding included $2.7 million state & City HOME funds, $2 million in TOD $, $750K CATNHP, $15.6 million LIHTC, etc.

  9. Useful Resources • The New Transit Town: Best Practices in Transit-Oriented Development, edited by Hank Dittmar & Gloria Ohland, Island Press, 2004 • Transit-Oriented Development in the United States: Experiences, Challenges and Prospects. TCRP Report 102, Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, 2004 • Center for Transit-Oriented Development website: www.transitorienteddevelopment.org

  10. Contact Information Bob Gehret, Deputy Director Policy Development & Research Division Department of Neighborhood Development 26 Court Street, 8th Floor,Boston, MA 02108 E-mail: bgehret.dnd@cityofboston.gov Phone: (617) 635-0242