project spell sustainable practices for english language learners april 6 2014 conference n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Project SPELL: Sustainable Practices for English Language Learners April 6, 2014 Conference PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Project SPELL: Sustainable Practices for English Language Learners April 6, 2014 Conference

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 16

Project SPELL: Sustainable Practices for English Language Learners April 6, 2014 Conference - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 84 Views
  • Uploaded on

Project SPELL: Sustainable Practices for English Language Learners April 6, 2014 Conference. Supporting ELLs in NGSS Practices: Scientific Discourse and Argumentation Adele Schepige, WOU. Supporting ELLs in NGSS Practices: Scientific Discourse and Argumentation.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Project SPELL: Sustainable Practices for English Language Learners April 6, 2014 Conference' - jenn


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
project spell sustainable practices for english language learners april 6 2014 conference

Project SPELL:Sustainable Practices for English Language LearnersApril 6, 2014 Conference

Supporting ELLs in NGSS Practices: Scientific Discourse and Argumentation

Adele Schepige, WOU

supporting ells in ngss practices scientific discourse and argumentation
Supporting ELLs in NGSS Practices: Scientific Discourse and Argumentation
  • The Next Generation Science Standards place emphasis on scientific discourse and argumentation for K-12 student learning. Scientific argumentation is one of the eight NGSS scientific practices. This means ELLs will need to use higher level thinking and scientific language in making claims, providing evidence and making connections between the two or explaining that there are no connections between them. Participants will take part in and deconstruct a science activity that uses strategies supportive of ELLs that also support scientific argumentation and discourse.
next generation science standards
Next Generation Science Standards
  • Adopted in Oregon in March, 2014
  • Phased in over four years
ngss science and engineering practices
NGSS: Science and Engineering Practices

1. Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)

2. Developing and using models

3. Planning and carrying out investigations

4. Analyzing and interpreting data

  • 5. Using mathematics and computational thinking
  • 6. Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering)
  • 7. Engaging in argument from evidence
  • 8. Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information
7 engaging in argument from evidence
7. Engaging in argument from evidence

Argumentation is a process for reaching agreements about explanations and design solutions. In science, reasoning and argument based on evidence are essential in identifying the best explanation for a natural phenomenon. In engineering, reasoning and argument are needed to identify the best solution to a design problem. (NGSS, p 13)

7 engaging in argument from evidence1
7. Engaging in argument from evidence

Students are expected to use argumentation to listen to, compare, and evaluate competing ideas and methods based on their merits. (NGSS, p 13)

7 engaging in argument from evidence2
7. Engaging in argument from evidence
  • http://www.bozemanscience.com/ngs-engaging-in-argument-from-evidence

Stop at 7:05 minutes

what is argumentation in science
What is argumentation in science?
  • Voice opinions based on evidence
  • Negotiate meaning
  • Link questions, claims evidence and rebuttals or contradictions
  • Working with beginning and unsettled knowledge
  • Use of reasoning
  • Note: Argumentation is not arguing
time to experience science argumentation
Time to experience science argumentation!
  • Four stations sampler- timed.

The stations are: Defending Predictions, Claims cards, Pause

and Reflect, and Negotiating a Concept Map

  • Must stay at the station until it is time to move.
  • You can go to stations in any order.
  • Each station has a set of instructions.
  • Reflection on language after completing each one.
stations debrief
Stations debrief
  • What happened?
  • How did it happen?
  • What kind of science language did you hear?
back to bozeman
Back to Bozeman…..
  • http://www.bozemanscience.com/ngs-engaging-in-argument-from-evidence
  • From 7:05 to end – argumentation in science education
purpose of argumentation
Purpose of argumentation
  • Show how data support a claim
  • Identify possible weaknesses in someone’s scientific arguments
  • Identify flaws in your own arguments
  • Improve arguments in response to criticism
  • Lead to explanation
  • Lead to Peer review: presentation at scientific conferences and publishing in peer reviewed journals
supporting ells in argumentation
Supporting ELLs in argumentation
  • Academic vocabulary
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Practice in informal setting
sentence frames for argumentation
Sentence frames for argumentation

Ross, D., Fisher, D., & Frey, N. (2009). The Art of Argumentation. Science And Children, 47(3), 28-31.

  • Which ones from the list did you naturally use during the stations?
  • What sentence (language) frames can you add to the list based on what you heard at the stations?
  • Others you can think of to add?
resources
Resources
  • Science and Children
  • Carrier, K. A. (2005). Supporting Science Learning through Science Literacy Objectives for English Language Learners. Science Activities, 42(2), 5.
  • Donnelly, W., & Roe, C. J. (2010). Using Sentence Frames to Develop Academic Vocabulary for English Learners. Reading Teacher, 64(2), 131-136. doi:10.1598/RT.64.2.5