Addressing the Stroke Continuum through Policy and System Change: A Brainstorming Session - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

ivan
slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Addressing the Stroke Continuum through Policy and System Change: A Brainstorming Session PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Addressing the Stroke Continuum through Policy and System Change: A Brainstorming Session

play fullscreen
1 / 29
Download Presentation
136 Views
Download Presentation

Addressing the Stroke Continuum through Policy and System Change: A Brainstorming Session

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

    1. Addressing the Stroke Continuum through Policy and System Change: A Brainstorming Session Kathy Foell, MS, RD Hilary K. Wall, MPH Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention and Control Program Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) Mary G. George, MD, MSPH, FACS Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    2. Policy and System Changes Policies include laws, regulations, and rules (both formal and informal) Laws and regulations that restrict smoking in public buildings Organizational rules that provide time off during work hours for diabetes self-management activities System change includes changes to economic, social, or physical environments Implementing stroke standing orders in hospital Emergency Departments

    3. Why Focus on Stroke? Leading cause of disability, third leading cause of death overall Common perception is that there is no medical treatment Improvements in treatment (thrombolytics) can stop brain loss National guidelines published Stroke has gone from a hopeless condition to a treatable condition ? Shift in treatment paradigm; non-emergent to emergent condition Misconception by public as well as health care providers. Most effective treatments need to be given as soon as possible (within three hours of symptom onset). Hospital needs an hour for diagnostics; people need to get to hospital w/in 2 hours of onset.Misconception by public as well as health care providers. Most effective treatments need to be given as soon as possible (within three hours of symptom onset). Hospital needs an hour for diagnostics; people need to get to hospital w/in 2 hours of onset.

    4. Resource Recommendations for the Establishment of Stroke Systems of Care; Recommendations From the ASAs Task Force on the Development of Stroke Systems Stroke. 2005;36:1-14 Recommendations from the ASAs Task Force on the Development of Stroke Systems responsible for developing recommendations on the organization and operation of systems of care for the treatment of stroke patients throughout the USRecommendations from the ASAs Task Force on the Development of Stroke Systems responsible for developing recommendations on the organization and operation of systems of care for the treatment of stroke patients throughout the US