Download
weather dynamics n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Weather Dynamics PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Weather Dynamics

Weather Dynamics

341 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Weather Dynamics

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Unit 4 Weather Dynamics

  2. Weather Dynamics 1 – Intro to Meteorology 2 – Sun’s Solar Energy 3 – Heat Transfer 4 – Water Cycle 5 – Seasons 6 – World Wide Currents 7 – Weather 8 – Knowing & Forecasting Weather Science 10

  3. Intro 1

  4. Introduction To Weather Dynamics Science 10 Ms. Albarico

  5. Brainstorming About Weather • List as many weather words as you know • Compile them as a group • What do they mean? We will try to answer these over the course of the week • What questions do you have about weather? • Think of five questions • Compile them as a group • We will try to answer these over the course of this week also

  6. Framing Questions What is meteorology? What is the difference between climate and weather? How do we read weather data presented to us daily? What do the terms mean? Where can we find accurate weather data?

  7. Meteorology The study of the Earth’s atmosphere and weather systems.

  8. Climate A widespread, long-lasting and recurring conditions of the atmosphere.

  9. Weather The day to day changes in the atmosphere at a particular location on Earth.

  10. Students are expected to : • Identify questions to investigate that arise from considering the energy transferred within the water cycle. • Describe examples that illustrate the atmosphere and hydrosphere are heat sinks in the water cycle. • Explain how scientific knowledge evolves about changing weather patterns with new evidence about changes in ocean temperature.

  11. Inquiring about Weather • Describe a severe weather event that you have experienced. Is it important to study weather? Why or why not? Severe weather comes to Nova Scotia in the form of snow, fog, freezing rain, hail, heavy rain, or strong winds. These weather events can trigger flooding and storm surges that affect the whole province.

  12. Sun’s Solar Energy 2

  13. The Atmosphere: Energy Transfer and Properties • Weather is the physical conditions of the atmosphere at a specific time and place. • Weather changes constantly. • Weather varies from place to place. • Weather is closely monitored. How are daily weather forecasts beneficial? TO PREVIOUS SLIDE

  14. Each of these weather components can affect activities or situations. For each component, describe how an activity or situation might require knowledge of the conditions. The Atmosphere: Energy Transfer and Properties TO PREVIOUS SLIDE

  15. Earth’s Energy Budget • Solar energy is energy generated by the Sun. • It consists of seven types of electromagnetic waves. TO PREVIOUS SLIDE • Explain why visible light is represented by a rainbow of colours in the figure below. Continued…

  16. Earth’s Energy Budget Solar energy travels to Earth by a process called radiation− thermal energy transfer in which atoms or molecules give off energy as electromagnetic waves when they interact with matter such as air, water, or soil. Solar energy is reflected, absorbed, or emitted (given off) by matter as it travels through the biosphere. The various wavelengths of solar energy are affected differently when they reach Earth. Earth maintains an energy and temperature balance because approximately the same amount of energy enters and leaves Earth’s atmosphere. TO PREVIOUS SLIDE

  17. Earth’s Energy Budget

  18. Earth’s Energy Budget

  19. Heat Transfer 3

  20. Incoming and Outgoing Radiation About 49 percent of the solar energy that enters Earth’s atmosphere is absorbed by the land. About 42 percent is absorbed, reflected, and scattered by clouds, gases, and aerosols in the atmosphere. About 9 percent is reflected by Earth’s surface. How can a cloud absorb thermal energy? TO PREVIOUS SLIDE

  21. Factors Affecting Absorption of Energy Continued… TO PREVIOUS SLIDE • Both the colour and type of a substance affect its ability to absorb energy. • Dark colours absorb energy. • Light colours reflect energy. • A substance’s albedo is the amount of energy its surface can reflect. Give an example of a substance that has a high albedo and a substance that has a low albedo.

  22. Factors Affecting Absorption of Energy TO PREVIOUS SLIDE • Different substances absorb energy at different rates. • The property of a substance that involves how a substance absorbs and releases energy (and how quickly) is called its specific heat capacity. • Water has a high specific heat capacity. Water heats up and cools off more slowly than land does. Both water and land heat up and cool off more slowly than air does. Water is a heat sink.

  23. Keeping in the Heat What can occur when the atmosphere contains more greenhouse gases than normal? TO PREVIOUS SLIDE • Why doesn’t thermal energy radiate into space at night? • The greenhouse gases act as a heat sink. They absorb thermal energy and radiate the energy in all directions. • These gases cause the troposphere—where weather occurs—to retain more heat than it would if these gases were not present.

  24. Heat Transfer

  25. Thermal Energy Transfer by Conduction, Convection, and Radiation Continued… TO PREVIOUS SLIDE • Thermal energy is transferred from a warmer object to a cooler object, and it is transferred in three ways. • Radiation is the transfer of thermal energy by electromagnetic waves. • Conductionis the transfer of thermal energy between two objects or substances that are in direct contact. • Convectionis the transfer of thermal energy by the movement of heated material (liquids or gases) from one place to another.

  26. Thermal Energy Transfer by Conduction, Convection, and Radiation Explain in your own words how thermal energy is transferred in the atmosphere by conduction, convection, and radiation. TO PREVIOUS SLIDE

  27. Thermal Energy Transfer by Conduction, Convection, and Radiation TO PREVIOUS SLIDE

  28. Text Book p. 427(Let the students copy the specific heat capacities table)Textbook p 428-429Model ProblemsPractice Exercise– Give the hand out. Sci 10

  29. Atmospheric Pressure TO PREVIOUS SLIDE • At sea level, the atmospheric pressure is about 101.3 kPa. • As altitude increases, atmospheric pressure decreases. • As altitude increases, temperature decreases. • As altitude increases, the density of the atmosphere also decreases. • How would the changes in altitude, temperature, density, and atmospheric pressure affecta mountain climber on the peak of Mount Everest?

  30. Atmospheric Pressure TO PREVIOUS SLIDE • Meteorologists—scientists who study weather– use atmospheric pressure readings to predict changes in the weather. • A decrease in atmospheric pressure suggests that warm, humid air is approaching and that the temperature will increase. • An increase in atmospheric pressure suggests that cool, dry weather is approaching.

  31. Review TO PREVIOUS SLIDE • Weather refers to physical conditions of the atmosphere at a specific time and place. • Earth’s energy budget is maintained by radiating as much energy into space as Earth absorbs from the Sun. Albedo and specific heat capacity affect how much of the Sun’s energy is absorbed by Earth’s surfaces. • The vast amount of water on Earth acts as a heat sink that has a significant influence on temperature. • Radiation, conduction, and convection transfer thermal energy through the atmosphere. • Atmospheric pressure decreases as altitude, temperature, and humidity increase. • Changes in the state of water involve absorption and release of thermal energy.

  32. Water Cycle 4

  33. The Role of Water in Transferring Energy in the Atmosphere Where is the thermal energy stored in water molecules? TO PREVIOUS SLIDE • Because of water’s high specific heat capacity, a lot of energy is needed to change the temperature of water. • Oceans and lakes have a moderating effect on air temperature for nearby land because of water’s high specific heat capacity.

  34. Seasons 5

  35. The Causes of Weather TO PREVIOUS SLIDE • The amount of solar energy that Earth receives every year is the same amount that Earth radiates back into space. The distribution of this energy is not equal throughout Earth. Three factors affect the distribution of solar energy on Earth. • Earth’s curved surface • Earth’s tilt on its axis • Earth’s orbit

  36. How Earth’s Curved Surface Affects Weather TO PREVIOUS SLIDE • The amount of solar energy that reaches different regions of Earth varies because of Earth’s curved surface. • The concentration of light that warms Earth’s surface is unequally distributed.

  37. How Earth’s Tilt Affects Weather TO PREVIOUS SLIDE • Earth’s tilt causes the yearly pattern of changes called seasons. • As Earth orbits the Sun, the northern hemisphere is sometimes tilted toward the Sun and at other times it is tilted away. • Describe how the tilt of the Earth affects temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere • .

  38. Earth’s Position Chinese Subtitle Chinese Explanation

  39. How Earth’s Orbit Affects Weather TO PREVIOUS SLIDE • The shape of Earth’s orbit affects how much solar energy it receives. • When Earth’s orbit is more oval, Earth gets much more solar energy when it is nearest the Sun than when it is farthest from the Sun. • When the orbit is circular, solar energy is more evenly balanced during the year. • How long does it take Earth to cycle from an oval orbit to a circular orbit?

  40. Weather Dynamics 1 – Intro to Meteorology 2 – Sun’s Solar Energy 3 – Heat Transfer 4 – Energy & Water 5 – Water Cycle 6 – Seasons 7 – World Wide Currents 8 – Weather 9 – Knowing & Forecasting Weather Science 10

  41. World Wide Currents 6

  42. Air Masses • The air over a warm surface can be heated, causing it to rise above more dense air. • The result is the formation of an air mass—a very large mass of air that has the same properties, such as humidity and temperature, as the area over which the air mass forms. • Which air mass is shown nearest Nova Scotia, and what are the characteristics of it? TO PREVIOUS SLIDE

  43. Air Masses What other air masses can you see? How do they affect other parts of North America? TO PREVIOUS SLIDE

  44. High Pressure Systems TO PREVIOUS SLIDE • When an air mass cools over an ocean or a cold region of land, a high pressure system forms. • As the air mass cools, the air mass becomes more dense. • When the air mass contracts, it draws in surrounding air from the upper atmosphere. • How does wind form in this process?

  45. Low Pressure Systems • Air masses that travel over warm land or oceans may develop into low pressure systems. • When an air mass warms, it expands and rises. As it rises, it cools. • Water vapour in the air may condense, producing clouds or precipitation. What kind of weather is expected when there is a low pressure system? TO PREVIOUS SLIDE