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  1. E-Governance for and in • Public Administration: • What Government • We Want to Support? • Public Administration and Anti-Corruption Sub-Practice • Bratislava, 25-26 May 2005 • Yuri Misnikov, ICTD Regional Advisor

  2. Contents • What is e-Government • What is e-Government Strategy • Experience of EU Accession Countries • Road Map for e-Government • E-Governance Regional Projects

  3. Evolution of e-Government—Phase One (prepared for UNDP by Prof. Joe McDonagh, Trinity College, Dublin University) 1. What is e-Government • Introduced to the US Government by the National Science Foundation in 1997 • Late 1990s focused on sketching out arolefor digital technologies in Government exploiting ICT in the provision of public services and was initially clearly identified with the development of appropriate Government information websites. eEurope 2002 Action Plan offers a good example of the first phase.

  4. Evolution of e-Government—Phase Two (prepared for UNDP by Prof. Joe McDonagh, Trinity College, Dublin University) 1. What is e-Government • Second phase was marked by embracing a performance culturewhich tried to set strategies and targets for whole nations. In effect, countries tried for the first time to actively promote the use of the Internet in Government business. E-Government became an international benchmark as well as a political priority. • This phase was clearly dominated by a culture of assessment and performance indicators as currently exemplified in eEurope Action Plan 2005. In support of eEurope 2005, the Commission of the European Communities developed a set of e-Government benchmarking indicators.

  5. Evolution of e-Government—Phase Three (prepared for UNDP by Prof. Joe McDonagh, Trinity College, Dublin University) 1. What is e-Government • Third phase focuses on building institutional capacity for changeand views e-Government as part of the broader stream of public service modernization. • The strategic intention in this phase is to capture the full impact of ICT in public service modernization through the effective management of technological and organizational change.

  6. What is e-Government Performance? (source: Accenture e-Government report 2004) 1. What is e-Government • Maximum Added Value • Effectiveness • Service Delivery • Citizen’s Focus • Business’ Focus

  7. How to Assess the Value of e-Government?(source: Accenture. eGovernment Leadership: High Performance, Maximum Value Report.1994 www.accenture.com) 1. What is e-Government • By measuring internal effectiveness and efficiency • By measuring client orientation • By measuring Service Maturity= • Level of Breadth (availability online) + • Level of Completeness (maturity depth)

  8. e-Government Strategy—Integrating Technology into Governance(source: Prof. Joe McDonagh, Trinity College, Dublin University) How will we integrate technological &organisationalchange? 2. What is e-Government Strategy Where are we now? Where do we want to go?

  9. Initial Start Phase: Moving Away from Function-based Organization (source: ICT for Democratic Governance, Kyrgyzstan. 2004; Final Report., prepared by inDevelop, Sweden for UNDP Kyrgyzstan) 2. What is e-Government Strategy Unit 1 / Function 1 Unit 2 / Function 2 Unit 3/ Function 3 Unit 4 / Function 4

  10. Which Way to Go—Transition Phase: Defining Core Processes (source: ICT for Democratic Governance, Kyrgyzstan. 2004; Final Report., prepared by inDevelop, Sweden for UNDP Kyrgyzstan) 2. What is e-Government Strategy Unit 1 / Function 1 Unit 2 / Function 2 Unit 3 / Function 3 Unit 4 / Function 4

  11. Desired Result—Final Phase: Process & Communication-based Organization (source: ICT for Democratic Governance, Kyrgyzstan. 2004; Final Report., prepared by inDevelop, Sweden for UNDP Kyrgyzstan) 2. What is e-Government Strategy Unit 1 / Function 1 Unit 2 / Function 2 Unit 3/ Function 3 Unit 4 / Function 4 Core Process 1 Core Process 2 Core Process 3

  12. Levels of Well-Performing e-Government? (source: Accenture. eGovernment Leadership: High Performance, Maximum Value Report.1994 www.accenture.com) 2. What is e-Government Strategy • Two-way full transactions • Pro-active interaction and communication • One-way passive publishing of information

  13. What is High-Performance Government and How to Move to It? (source: Accenture. eGovernment Leadership: High Performance, Maximum Value Report.1994 www.accenture.com) 2. What is e-Government Strategy • WHAT: • More Value • Less Cost • Self-Accountability • HOW: • Discard old business models • Adapt newest technology • Transform Services

  14. How New EU Member States use ICTs?Facts & Statistics(source: Final eEurope+ Progress Report; prepared for the European Ministerial Conference, February 2004, Budapest www.europa.int) 3. Experience of EU Accession Countries • 80% use Internet for simple information search • 75% -- for communication purposes • 40% -- for downloading games/music 32% -- for visiting chat rooms and discussion forums • 23% -- for obtaining banking services, • 3% for financial services

  15. How New EU Member States use ICTs? Facts & Statistics (source: Final eEurope+ Progress Report; prepared for the European Ministerial Conference, February 2004, Budapest www.europa.int) 3. Experience of EU Accession Countries • e-Banking • as low as 5-10% • Estonia -- 95% of bank transactions are conducted via electronic channels • Looking for goods and services • healthy 51% • BUT actual online purchasing 12% and less • e-Business • 70% of companies with Internet connection • BUT only 39% were present on the Web • BUT less than one-tenth received orders online

  16. How New EU Member States use ICTs?Facts & Statistics (source: Final eEurope+ Progress Report; prepared for the European Ministerial Conference, February 2004, Budapest www.europa.int) 3. Experience of EU Accession Countries • e-Services to citizens • Grew rapidly from 1% to 20% of fully transactional online • 17% interacted online with public authorities to obtain, e.g., official forms • BUT only 9% returned these forms back to the government • Only 16% of enterprises used the Internet to make social contribution for employees • Only 11% to handle VAT declaration and notification.

  17. The Way Forward—Recommendations (source: Final eEurope+ Progress Report; prepared for the European Ministerial Conference, February 2004, Budapest www.europa.int) 4. Road Map for e-Government • Use web-technology to build state-level information systems to replace other traditional user interface technologies to allow for new possibilities for the unification and integration of e-services. • Move from back-office centered developments to front office or unified user interface ones. • Place workplace software of information systems in central servers instead of workplace computers to enable each Internet computer to serve as a terminal for many information systems.

  18. The Way Forward—Recommendations (source: Final eEurope+ Progress Report; prepared for the European Ministerial Conference, February 2004, Budapest www.europa.int) 4. Road Map for e-Government • Move away from in the development of databases of data collection to services • Move away from institution-based approach to inter-institutional one. • Move away from infrastructure development to that of information systems • Operationalize Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) in synergy with ID cards for new opportunities for unified identification of users of e-services and for the use of digital signatures.

  19. The Way Forward—Recommendations (source: Final eEurope+ Progress Report; prepared for the European Ministerial Conference, February 2004, Budapest www.europa.int) 4. Road Map for e-Government • Stimulate the deployment of interactive media-rich content to drive the broadband access to the Internet • Ensure access to public sector information for a faster adoption of new ways of communication with the state • Invest more by regional and local governments in Public Internet Access Points (PIAP), especially school-based to bring ICTs closer to people • Involve sufficiently large user population that will motivate the business sector to invest in the provision of ICT-enabled services

  20. The Way Forward—Recommendations (source: Final eEurope+ Progress Report; prepared for the European Ministerial Conference, February 2004, Budapest www.europa.int) 4. Road Map for e-Government • Continue implementation of e-government initiatives beyond simple provision of information and towards fully transactional services focused on the needs of citizens and businesses • Support innovative public-private partnerships to promote investment in and use of ICTs in small and medium enterprises. • Make available a rich and highly developed set of services that will motivate adoption by the public

  21. Key Conclusions 4. Road Map for e-Government • No public administration reform these can be started these days without integrating ICT/e-government benefits from the very outset • ICTs cannot be attached afterwards which will mean automation of bad practices • People are not interested how the government works internally—they are interested how its services them externally • It is never late to start but always better to start earlier than later • It is not about whether to deploy e-government but about to do in an accelerated manner • Increasing values for clients and decreasing costs are critical for success

  22. E-Governance—Core Regional Focus 5. e-Governance Regional Projects Transparency and accountability of government functions to civil society and development increased Citizens’ participation, especially of vulnerable groups, in policy dialogue increased through enhanced access to information

  23. E-Governance—Project Level 5. e-Governance Regional Projects

  24. E-Governance—Project Level 5. e-Governance Regional Projects

  25. E-Policies—Activity Level e-PPPs Activity 1: Business Partnerships (Ongoing) e-Community Activity 2: Rural Information Society (Ongoing) e-Participation Activity 3: Public Policy Networking (Planned) 5. e-Governance Regional Projects E-Policies

  26. E-Policies—Activity Level PPPs principles and mechanisms in Information Society (started) Generation of new knowledge and transfer of Best Practices (started) Business Partnerships and alliances to advance access to information, communication rights and support entrepreneurships (planned) 5. e-Governance Regional Projects Public-Private Partnerships (Ongoing)

  27. E-Policies—Activity Level Guiding materials to advance access to ICTs in rural areas (started, transfer of Hungarian experience) Competency and skill development via training/ e-learning in e-Community in Hungary for community and ICTD development Practitioners (started) Business partnerships and alliances to advance access to ICTs, including for SMME (planned) Generation of new knowledge and transfer of Best Practices (started) 5. e-Governance Regional Projects E-Community (Ongoing)

  28. E-Policies—Activity Level Guiding materials to advance virtual Activities for participation in public policy (planned, transfer of Latvian and Estonian experience) Competency and skill development via training and e-learning (planned) Generation of new knowledge and transfer of Best Practices (started) 5. e-Governance Regional Projects E-Participation (Planned)

  29. E-Governance—Activity Level eGA Activity 1: e-Governance Academy (Ongoing) e-Competency Activity 2: e-Governance Teaching (Started) e-Transparency Activity 3: Access to Information (Planned) e-Government Activity 5: Turn-Around PA (Planned) FOSS Activity 4: Open Source Software (Planned) 5. e-Governance Regional Projects E-Governance

  30. E-Governance—Activity Level New training in local e-governance, access to information, e-democracy, gender equality, corruption, PPPs, FOSS (ongoing & planned) Consultancy & Policy advice (ongoing) Project formulation and implementation (ongoing) Networking via listservs and annual regional e-governance summit (planned) 5. e-Governance Regional Projects E-Governance Academy (Ongoing)

  31. E-Governance—Activity Level Handbook for PA schools and universities to transfer EU accession and candidate countries (planned) Curriculum development and e-learning (planned) Exchange of instructors (planned) 5. e-Governance Regional Projects E-Governance Teaching (Planned)

  32. E-Governance—Activity Level Guiding materials and training in application of Public Information Acts (transfer EU expertise, planned) Training and curriculum development (planned) Consultancy and expert support (planned) Law drafting, consultation, implementation strategies (planned) Generation of new knowledge and transfer of Best Practices (started) 5. e-Governance Regional Projects E-Transparency (Planned)

  33. E-Governance—Activity Level Guiding materials and training in application of open standards and platforms Migration to FOSS, especially at local level (planned) Consultancy, training, expert exchange (planned) Generation of new knowledge and transfer of Best Practices (started) 5. e-Governance Regional Projects Free/Open Software (Planned)

  34. E-Governance—Activity Level Guiding materials and training in integration of technology and organizational change (planned) ICT-enabled Business Process Analysis of public service organizations (planned) Consultancy, training, expert exchange (planned) Generation of new knowledge and transfer of Best Practices (planned) 5. e-Governance Regional Projects E-Administration (Planned)

  35. Thank you! • Yuri.Misnikov@undp.org