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UNCLASSIFIED. ENERGY FOR THE WARFIGHTER: The DoD Operational Energy Strategy. Tom Morehouse Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Operational Energy. The Context: Strategic Environment. Homeland Defense. Current Conflicts. WMD Proliferation. Cyber Threats.

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energy for the warfighter the dod operational energy strategy
UNCLASSIFIED

ENERGY FOR THE WARFIGHTER:The DoD Operational Energy Strategy

Tom Morehouse

Principal Deputy

Assistant Secretary of Defense

Operational Energy

the context strategic environment
The Context: Strategic Environment

Homeland Defense

Current Conflicts

WMD Proliferation

Cyber Threats

Humanitarian Assistance

Rising Powers

the context global energy supply and demand
The Context: Global Energy Supply and Demand

Dynamic energy markets have geopolitical, fiscal, and strategic implications

Sources: BP Statistical Review Year-End 2004 and Energy Information Administration; Environmental Action; BP Statistical Review of World Energy June 2011 Reserves-to-production ratios

defense energy challenges
Defense Energy Challenges
  • Complicated distribution networks
  • Tactical fuel logistics in contested battlespace
  • Inefficient equipment in theater adds to burden
  • New capabilities with growing energy needs
  • Implications for sustainment
  • Legacy equipment
  • Energy Choke Points
  • High and Volatile Prices
  • Threats to fuel projection affect power projection
  • AirSea Battle
defense energy opportunities
Defense Energy Opportunities
  • Centralized power generation
  • Energy-efficient shelters, lighting, and heating/air conditioning
  • Fielding of advanced power distribution
  • Tactical Solar
  • Improved routing and flight profiles
  • Optimized cargo loading and center of gravity
  • Engine wash / less drag
  • Hybrid electric drives in LHDs, LHAs, and DDGs
  • Better hull and propeller coatings and stern flaps
  • UUVs
the dod operational energy strategy
The DoD Operational Energy Strategy
  • GOAL: to assure that U.S. armed forces will have the energy they require for 21st century military missions

Capability

Risk

Cost

Reduce Demand for Energy in Military Operations

More Fight, Less Fuel

Expand and Secure the Supply of Energy to Military Operations

More Options, Less Risk

Build Energy Security into the Future Force

More Capability, Less Cost

operational energy is operational capability
Operational Energy is Operational Capability

Gen James Mattis

12 July 2011

Gen John R. Allen

11 December 2011

Leadership stands behind capability improvements through operational energy

implementation plan
Implementation Plan
  • Measure Operational Energy Consumption
  • Improve Energy Performance and Efficiency
  • Promote Operational Energy Innovation
  • Improve Operational Energy Security at Fixed Installations
  • Promote the Development of Alternative Fuels
  • Incorporate Energy Security Considerations into Requirements and Acquisition
  • Adapt Policy, Doctrine, PME, and CCMD Activities

Near, Mid, and Long-Term Goals

Energy Security for the Warfighter

operational energy capability improvement fund pe 0604055d8z
Operational Energy Capability Improvement Fund PE 0604055D8Z

Mission:Fund innovation to improve operational effectiveness via science & technology investments to improve energy performance of our forces. Incentivize long term change in line with OE Strategy.

  • Technical Goal – Develop or demonstrate and rapidly transition new operational energy technologies and practices that will improve military capabilities and reduce costs.
  • Institutional Goal – Establish within the Services a sustainable DoD capacity that will continue those innovations. This PE provides “seed funds” to establish/consolidate programs that will be sustained by the Services.

The Operational Energy Capability Improvement Fund Complements OEPP’s oversight role

operational energy capability improvement fund basic concept for fy 12
Operational Energy Capability Improvement Fund Basic Concept for FY 12
  • Programs to develop or demonstrate technologies or practices that will reduce the energy load of expeditionary outposts
    • Load is the final use of energy that drives the entire demand
    • FOBs, Combat Outposts and patrol bases for combat, stability and humanitarian operations
  • Key and unusual features
    • Looking for Programs, not just a series of projects
    • Strongly encourage leveraging and involving non-traditional innovators
  • Programs to be executed through RDT&E organizations, not OSD
  • OEPP will fund this set of programs for 3 fiscal years
program proposals received
Program Proposals Received
  • 32 Program Proposals Received Via:
    • 22 - Service Energy Offices (16 Army, 4 Navy, 2 Air Force)
    • 9 - COCOMs (5- SOUTHCOM, 2 CENTCOM or CENTCOM/EUCOM,1 PACOM, 1 AFRICOM)
    • 1 - DOD-DOE MOU Executive Committee
  • Considerable overlap and complementarities
    • Combined 6 Army and AF proposals into one shelters program
    • Combined PACOM testbed proposal with comprehensive expeditionary outpost proposal from DOE/Oak Ridge
  • Resulting in 5 Programs
five oecif programs
Five OECIF Programs
  • Two focused on improving heating and air conditioning equipment for expeditionary outposts
    • Innovative Cooling Equipment (ICE) Development/Demonstration Program; led by Army Communications Electronics Research, Development, and Engineering Center
    • Navy Expeditionary Technology Transition Program; led by Naval Facilities Engineering Command Expeditionary Program Office
  • Two focused on energy efficient shelters
    • Advanced, Energy Efficient Shelter Systems for Contingency Basing and Other Applications; led by Army Natick Soldier Research, Development, and Engineering Center
    • Super Energy Efficient Containerized Living Unit (SuperCLU) Design and Development; led by Naval Facilities Engineering Command
  • One to identify and assess technology to reduce energy load of expeditionary outposts in tropical environments
    • Transformative Reductions in Operational Energy Consumption (TROPEC); led by PACOM
two complementary efforts
Two Complementary Efforts
  • Project to establish a quantitative baseline for energy use in Afghanistan and test an array of energy related technology
    • Led by Army Research Development and Engineering Command – Field Assistance in Science and Technology Center – Bagram Air Base
  • Program to develop efficient, deployable waste to energy systems
    • Teamed with SERDP to fund four projects towards this goal.
doe dod energy security mou
DOE-DOD Energy Security MOU
  • On July 22nd,2010, Deputy Secretary Poneman and Deputy Secretary Lynn signed an Energy Security MOU to better leverage the resources, expertise, and capabilities of both agencies to achieve our respective missions.
  • This partnership can help propel research, development, and deployment of new energy technologies that will assure DOD access to reliable supplies of energy to meet both operational and installation energy needs. It can also help DOE propel new technologies into the marketplace at a faster pace.
  • Joint activities under the MOU now cover a wide range of areas, including energy storage, microgrids, vehicle technologies, tactical renewable energy technologies, and systems to reduce overall fuel demand at our forward operating bases.
uspacom operational energy summit march 6 7 2012 outcomes
USPACOM Operational Energy SummitMarch 6-7 2012 Outcomes
  • “Quick Wins”
    • Operational Energy policy memo to commanders from USPACOM senior leadership
    • Operational energy considerations in TERMINAL FURY 2012
    • Energy-efficient equipment in CRIMSON VIPER
  • USPACOM Action Plan to Implement Operational Energy Strategy and Improve Energy Security for Warfighters
    • Governance Structure
    • Analysis
    • Planning
    • Security Cooperation
    • Exercises and Training
slide17
http://energy.defense.gov

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improved heating and air conditioning equipment for expeditionary outposts
Improved Heating And Air Conditioning Equipment For Expeditionary Outposts
  • Innovative Cooling Equipment (ICE) Development/Demonstration Program; led by Army Communications Electronics Research, Development, and Engineering Center
  • Navy Expeditionary Technology Transition Program; led by Naval Facilities Engineering Command Expeditionary Program Office
energy efficient shelters
Energy Efficient Shelters
  • Advanced, Energy Efficient Shelter Systems for Contingency Basing and Other Applications; led by Army Natick Soldier Research, Development, and Engineering Center
  • Super Energy Efficient Containerized Living Unit (SuperCLU) Design and Development; led by Naval Facilities Engineering Command
reducing demand for tropical expeditionary outposts
Reducing Demand for Tropical Expeditionary Outposts
  • Transformative Reductions in Operational Energy Consumption (TROPEC); led by PACOM
examples of leveraging
Examples of Leveraging
  • ICE led by Army CERDEC, teamed with Navy ONR
  • Navy Expeditionary Technology Transition led by Navy NAVFAC, teamed with ARPA-E
  • Advanced Energy Efficient Shelters led by Army Natick, teamed with AFRL and Army Construction Engineering Research Lab
  • TROPEC led by PACOM, teamed with USMC Pacific Experimentation Center and DOE Oak Ridge and Lawrence Berkeley
two complementary efforts1
Two Complementary Efforts
  • Project to establish a quantitative baseline for energy use in Afghanistan and test an array of energy related technology
    • Led by Army Research Development and Engineering Command – Field Assistance in Science and Technology Center – Bagram Air Base
  • Program to develop efficient, deployable waste to energy systems
    • Teamed with SERDP to fund four projects towards this goal.

OECIF POC: [email protected]

energy for a globally active force
Energy for a Globally Active Force

Defense Fuel Supply Sales By Country(January-April 2011)

Greenland

4.6M Gallons

$14.1M

Germany

54.4M Gallons

$164.4M

Kyrgyzstan

41.6M Gallons

$126.1M

Spain

40.6M Gallons

$123.1M

Italy

14.6M Gallons

$44.4M

Japan

55.9M Gallons

$169.2M

Iraq

94.5M Gallons

$285.7M

Afghanistan

76.2M Gallons

$231.4M

Vessels Afloat

168.6M Gallons

$510M

Qatar

93.1M Gallons

$282.2M

UAE

65.0M Gallons

$199.0M

Guam

18.4M Gallons

$55.6M

1,538,127,144 Gallons of Fuel in 4 months

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