100 Common Word Usage Problems - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

100 common word usage problems n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
100 Common Word Usage Problems PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
100 Common Word Usage Problems

play fullscreen
1 / 23
100 Common Word Usage Problems
173 Views
Download Presentation
hollie
Download Presentation

100 Common Word Usage Problems

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. 100 Common Word Usage Problems Rules 1-20

  2. The article a is used before consonant sounds The article an before vowel sounds. Words starting with h, o, or u might have either a consonant sound or a vowel sound. • a histology class (h-sound) • a one-way path (w-sound) • a uniform look (y-sound) ( 1 ) A and An

  3. Accept, a verb, means “to receive.” Except, a preposition, means “leaving out” or “other than.” She did not accept/exceptthe job offer. She did not acceptthe job offer. Accept/exceptfor Maggie, we were all excited about the reunion. Exceptfor Maggie, we were all excited about the reunion. ( 2 ) Accept / Except

  4. Accusemeans “to blame” or “to carry a charge against.” Allegemeans “to claim one thing that has not been proven.” He was alleged/accused of treason, which he vehemently denied. He was accused of treason, which he vehemently denied. It was alleged/accusedthat he secretly cooperated with the Japanese during the war. It was alleged that he secretly cooperated with the Japanese during the war. ( 3 ) Accuse / Allege

  5. Adapt, a verb, means “to change.” Adopt, also a verb, means “to take as one’s own.” We were finally able to adapt/adoptto the cold climate. We were finally able to adapt to the cold climate. The group adopted/adaptedthe strategy and implemented it. The group adopted the strategy and implemented it. ( 4 ) Adapt / Adopt

  6. Adviceis a noun which means “an opinion.” Adviseis a verb that means “to give an opinion to.” I miss the advice/advise that mom used to bombard me with. I miss the advice that mom used to bombard me with. She advised/advicedme to remain strong and independent. She advisedme to remain strong and independent. ( 5 ) Advice / Advise

  7. Affectis almost always a verb which means “to influence.” Effect, often a noun, means “result.” Occasionally, effect is a verb which means “to bring about” or “to cause.” I would not let my personal issues effect/affect my work. I would not let my personal issues effect/affect my work. She effected/affectedpolicies that benefited your business. She effected/affected policies that benefited your business. ( 6 ) Affect / Effect

  8. Aggravatemeans “to make worse.” Avoid using this phrase as a synonym of “annoy.” INCORRECT: She was severely aggravated by his impolite behavior. CORRECT: Delaying your visit to the physician will aggravateyour ailment. ( 7 ) Aggravate

  9. Ain’t, initially a contraction of AM NOT, will not be considered acceptable in standard English. Avoid using it in all writing and speaking. INCORRECT: I ain’t going to the party tonight. CORRECT: I am not going to the party tonight. ( 8 ) Ain’t

  10. Allot, a verb, means “to divide in parts” or “to give out in shares.” A lot is an informal expression which means “a great many” or “a large amount.” Avoid using it in formal writing. Joe will allot/a lota portion of his monthly pay for charity. Joe will allot a portion of his monthly pay to charity. He has a lot/allot of children to support. He has a lot of children to support. ( 9 ) Allot, A lot

  11. All ready is an expression which means “ready.” Already means “by or before this time” or “even now.” We are all ready/already to listen to the President. We are all readyto listen to the President. We have already/all ready arrived at a decision. We have already arrived at a decision. ( 10 ) All ready / Already

  12. Alrightis nonstandard spelling. Always use the two-word “all right” kind in your writing. INCORRECT: It is alrightto clock out early today. CORRECT: It is all right to clock out early today. ( 11 ) Alright, All right

  13. All together means “all at once.” Altogethermeans “completely” or “in all.” Altogether/ All together, the audience booed the play. All together, the audience booed the play. They didn’t altogether/all together agree that the play rocked. They didn’t altogetheragree that the play rocked. ( 12 ) All together, Altogether

  14. A.M. refers to the hours earlier than noon P.M. to the hours after noon. Do not spell out numbers if you use these abbreviations, and do not use such phrases as “in the morning” or “in the afternoon” with them. INCORRECT: We will depart at nine A.M. in the morning. CORRECT: We will depart at 9:00 A.M. ( 13 ) A.M. / P.M.

  15. Amongand between are both prepositions. Amongat all times implies three or more. Betweenis used when referring to items. John is among/betweenthe best students in his class. John is amongthe best students in his class. The argument was among/betweenFrank and Fred. The argument was betweenFrank and Fred. ( 14 ) Among, Between

  16. Use amountwith qualities and quantities that can’t be counted. Use numberwith things that can be counted. I take a small number/amountof sugar in my coffee. I take a small amountof sugar in my coffee. The number/amount of empty bottles is staggering. The numberof empty bottles is staggering. ( 15 ) Amount, Number

  17. Anxiousmeans “worried,” “uneasy,” or “fearful.” Do not use it as a substitute for “eager.” CORRECT: I am anxious about the upcoming unit exam. AMBIGUOUS: I am anxiousto meet new people. CLEAR: I am always eager to meet new people. ( 16 ) Anxious

  18. Anyoneand everybody mean “any person” and “every person.” Any one means “any single person (or thing).” Every one means “every single individual (or thing).” Any one/Anyone of you might win the lottery. Any one of you might win the lottery. Every one/Everyone complained about the food. Everyone complained about the food. ( 17 ) Anyone, Any one

  19. The following adverbs should never finish in –s: anyway, anywhere, everywhere, nowhere, somewhere. INCORRECT: The weather might be rough, but we’re going sailing anyways. CORRECT: The weather might be rough, but we’re going sailing anyway. ( 18 ) Anyway, Anywhere, etc.

  20. Do not use the conjunction “as” to imply “because” or “since.” INCORRECT: As she was terribly sick, she did not play well. CORRECT: Because she was terribly sick, she did not play well. ( 19 ) As

  21. As to is awkward. Replace it with about or on. INCORRECT: Doctors have a number of ideas as to how to stay healthy. CORRECT: Doctors have a number of ideas about how to stay healthy. ( 20 ) As To

  22. Review usage problems #1-20 Download from NetMoeller: 100 Common Usage Problems Complete questions: Exercises A-B Record your answers on the answer sheet given to you. In class assignment