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CHAPTER 18 INDUSTRY & URBAN GROWTH PowerPoint Presentation
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CHAPTER 18 INDUSTRY & URBAN GROWTH

CHAPTER 18 INDUSTRY & URBAN GROWTH

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CHAPTER 18 INDUSTRY & URBAN GROWTH

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  1. CHAPTER 18INDUSTRY & URBAN GROWTH CHAPTER 18 I CAN STATEMENT I CAN UNDERSTAND HOW INDUSTRIALIZATION INCREASED THE SPEED OF CHANGE IN THE UNITED STATES

  2. Bullet points p. 637 Read pgs. 608-613

  3. Section1A New Industrial Revolution I CAN UNDERSTAND HOW CONDITIONS IN THE U.S. SPURRED THE GROWTH OF INDUSTRY

  4. ASSIGNMENT • Do Time Line of inventions From 1851 – 1913. Due Thursday. At least 15 items.

  5. TIME LINE EXAMPLE

  6. NEW INVENTIONS & DISCOVERIES • Bessemer Process – Steel – 1851 • Oil in Pennsylvania – 1859 • Sholes’ typewriter - 1868 • Transcontinental RR – 1869 • Bell’s telephone - 1876 • Edison’s phonograph – 1877 • Edison light bulb – 1879 • Edison power plant – 1882 • Matzeliger’s shoe making machine – 1883 • 1st practical auto – Benz – 1885 - Germany • Eastman’s camera – 1888 • 1st U.S. production car – Duryea – 1893 • 1st motion picture camera – Louis Lumiere – France - 1895 • 1st powered flight – Wright brothers – 1903 • Assembly line perfected – Henry Ford 1913

  7. Bessemer Process - 1851

  8. Oil in Pennsylvania - 1859

  9. Sholes’ typewriter - 1868

  10. Transcontinental RR – 1869

  11. Bell’s telephone - 1876

  12. Edison’s phonograph – 1877

  13. Edison light bulb – 1879

  14. Edison power plant – 1882

  15. Matzeliger’s shoe making machine – 1883

  16. 1st practical auto – Benz – 1885 - Germany

  17. Eastman’s camera – 1888

  18. 1st U.S. production car – Duryea – 1893 Charles – born Canton, IL 1861

  19. Louis Lumiere – Movie CameraFrance - 1895

  20. 1st powered flight – Wright brothers – 1903

  21. Assembly line perfected – Henry Ford 1913

  22. Bullet points p. 637 Read pgs. 625- 629

  23. Ch 18 Sec 4The New Immigrants • I can understand how the experience of immigrants was both positive and negative

  24. Statistics • Between 1865 and 1915 – 25 million immigrants to U.S. • This is more than the U.S. population in 1850

  25. Reasons • LAND Amount of European farmland shrinking while populations grew • RELIGIOUS FREEDOM Jews from Russia Christians from Turkey

  26. Reasons • POLITICAL UNREST 1910 Mexican Revolution • JOBS U.S. companies recruited from overseas

  27. Reasons • FREEDOM Drew people who wanted democracy and liberty

  28. Immigrant Divisions Early 1800’s Late 1800’s From Southern or Eastern Europe Most Catholic or Jewish Few spoke English Little knowledge of democracy • Most from Northern and Western Europe • Most Protestant • Spoke English • Knew some democracy

  29. A New Life • Difficult decision to leave • Miserable trip • Most took trip in steerage – large compartments that usually held cattle

  30. Difficult Trip • Crowded conditions • Little ventilation • Sea sick • Easy to catch diseases

  31. Ellis Island • Arrivals from Europe through Ellis Island • Physical examinations • Disabled or sick sent back

  32. Who Came 1865 - 1915

  33. Where Did They Go • 2/3 stayed in cities Mulberry St. Little Italy

  34. ASSIMILATION • Immigration Societies helped • Older people clung with traditions • Younger people adapted easily • Education

  35. EDUCATION “The essence of American opportunity, the treasure that no thief can touch . . . Surer, safer than bread or butter.”

  36. Naturalization • 5 year wait (unless joined military – then 1 year) • Speak English • Give up previous citizenship • Law abiding

  37. Naturalization • 2 witnesses • Not a polygamist • Not an anarchist • Minor children citizens when parents are

  38. Contributions

  39. Contributions

  40. Contributions NEW FOODS • Spaghetti • Chow Mein • Bagels

  41. Famous Immigrants • Alexander Graham Bell – Scotland • Samuel Goldwyn – Poland • Louis Mayer – Ukraine • Arturo Toscanini – Italy • Leo Baekeland - Belgium

  42. Nativism • The policy of protecting the interests of native inhabitants against those of immigrants. • Political thought against immigrants BECAUSE

  43. Nativism • Different languages • “ religions • “ customs • Immigrants are violent • “ are criminals • “ are anarchists WHAT DOES THIS SOUND LIKE?

  44. Response • Chinese Exclusion Act – 1882 • Immigrants required to read and write – 1917 • Violence against immigrants • Discrimination