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Troop 947

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Troop 947

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  1. Troop 947 Safety Afloat and Canoeing Tips “A canoe is more stable than you think, but not more than you can sink.” - Duncan Lamar, yesterday

  2. Safety Afloat Basics • 9 Points See Safety Afloat presentation

  3. Types of PFDs • Type I - Offshore Lifejacket • This PFD is designed for extended survival in rough, open water. • Type II - Near Shore Buoyant Vest • This "classic" PFD for calm inland water where there is chance of fast rescue. • Type III - Flotation Aid • These life jackets are generally considered the most comfortable, with styles for different boating activities and sports. • Type IV - Throwable Device • These are designed to be thrown to a person in the water. • Type V - Special Use Device • Hybrid vest

  4. Sizing a PFD • PFDs will be provided by Morgan’s • Make sure you look at the label to see if the weight range is appropriate for you. • Next, try it on, and make sure it is not so loose that it rides up or so tight that it restricts your movement. • The PFD should be comfortable, even if it is a little annoying.

  5. Paddle

  6. Sizing Your Paddle • Two methods • Sit in a chair like the graphic at right with the t-handle on the seat, you should be looking at the throat of the paddle • Stand and place the blade on the ground. For lake canoeing, the t-handle should reach your nose. For river canoeing, a slightly shorter paddle is preferred (to your chin).

  7. Anatomy of a Canoe

  8. Strokes • For all canoists • Forward stroke • Back stroke • Draw • Forward sweep • Reverse sweep • Stern only • J-stroke

  9. River Hazards – Natural

  10. River Hazards - Man Made • Other canoeist • Submerged car parts • Floating debris • Dams or low water bridges

  11. Essential Gear to pack • Rope / bungy cords • First Aid Kit -- community • Bailing device • Food – by patrol • Toilet paper • Bug screen • Sun screen • Hand sanitizer • Knife • Dry bag (or trash bags double layered to keep stuff dry) • Trash bags • Water bottles, jug or Camel Back • Ammo box or other water tight container

  12. Appropriate Clothing • Swim suit • Close toed (leaky) shoes • T-shirt • Light-colored long sleeve shirt (in case of sunburn) • Hat • Sunglasses (cheap with Croakie or string) • Make sure they are things you don’t care if they get lost or mucked up

  13. How to Pack for a Float Trip • All gear should be tied into or otherwise attached to the canoe • The first aid kit should be waterproof and accessible • Your water supply should be out and accessible at all times – drink lots!!! • All other gear should be packed in dry bags and stowed in the middle of the canoe. • The bailing cup or device can be free floating in the bottom of the canoe. • Food should be stored in the coolers for all refrigerated items with a bungy cord to hold the lid down. All dry goods should be packed to protect against crushing and double or triple bagged (unless you really like soggy sandwiches).

  14. Canoeing Etiquette • Only remove your PFD when onshore. • The person in the stern steers / The person in the bow is the motor • Communicate (bow identifies obstacles, stern asks for help and gives direction) • Leave no trace • Everyone is out to have fun • A paddle is not a sword, nor a quarter-staff • Don’t dig the blade into the ground or river bed • Don’t drive your canoe through gravel or rocks… get out if you have to and “portage” • Do not pass the lead canoe or fall behind the caboose • ALWAYS keep your eyes out for inexperienced canoeists who may be in trouble. • Never try to perform a rescue yourselves when adults are present and available.

  15. Questions?

  16. HAVE FUN!!!