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Internet Overview – Accessing Information; Digital Divide

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  1. Internet Overview – Accessing Information; Digital Divide March 6, 2008

  2. Design and History of the Internet Layperson misconceptions WWW = Internet = Email = online = broadband • Some questions to think about • Who owns the Internet? • Who controls the Internet? • Is the current system OK? • Security • Scalability • Usability

  3. Structures of the Telecom Industry • Government Dept. • Government company (PTT) • Regulated Monopoly • Competition • Splits within sectors • IXC – InterExchange Carrier (Long Distance) • ILECs – Incumbent Local Exchange Carrier (“Baby Bells”) • CLECs – Competitive Local Exchange Carrier

  4. Government Departments • Losing ground • Privatization big push • Type 1 • Public Assets privatized and then regulated • Type 2 • Government carrier becomes one of many players

  5. PTT • PTT: Abbreviation for postal, telegraph, and telephone (organization). In countries having nationalized telephone and telegraph services, the organization, usually a governmental department, which acts as its nation's common carrier.

  6. “Call/Transaction” Completion Charges • Mail • Flat Rate • Telephony • Usage based or flat rate • Internet? • Depends on what user (residential, commercial, bulk, etc.)

  7. What is the Internet? • The global (public) network built from hundreds and thousands of internetworking independent networks. • No single entity “runs” the Internet • Operates on standards • Built on a modified hierarchical structure • Packet Switching a.k.a. Backbone Providers Tier 1 Tier 2 Users • There are often more layers • There can be interconnections other than at a backbone

  8. What makes the Internet the Internet? • Open architecture • Standards and protocols allow applications and communications without caring of the underlying infrastructure or system • “The Cloud” • Anyone can access anything (is public) • Resiliency (mesh design) • End to end system

  9. How big is the Internet? • Many metrics • Number of Service Providers • Number of Hosts • Number of Subscribers • Size of Interconnections • (see outside sources such as CAIDA, Hobbes Internet Timeline, etc.)

  10. Brief History of Internet Evolution • 1969 ARPANET50 kbpsUCLA, UCSB, SRI, and Utah • 1970 56 kbps transcontinentaladding BBN, MIT, RAND • 1972 50 kbps23 hosts • 1973 75% of traffic on ARPANET is email • 1981 CSNET (in parallel)56 kbps213 hosts • 1983 TCP/IP mandatory, DNS created562 hosts • 1985 NSFNET initiated1.544 Mbps1961 hosts • 1987 UUNET created for commercial access • 1990 ARPANET disbanded in favor of NSFNET 313,000 hosts • 1992NSFNET 45 Mbps upgrade complete 1,136,000 hosts (+ a few pvt. Backbones)

  11. Brief History of Internet Evolution (cont.) • 1994 NSFNET145 Mbps ATM3,864,000 hosts (+ a few pvt. Backbones of 56 kbps, 1.5 Mbps, and 45 Mbps) • 1995 NSFNET privatized to 4 players6,642,000 hosts • 1996MCI622 Mbps • 1996 - Now upgrading to 2.5 and 10 Gbps IP links This history has helped shape US Internet architecture in terms of competition and layout (peering)

  12. Peering • Where backbones come together • Major design issue (relates to cross-connection) • Public Peering • Network Access Points (NAPs) • Started with 4, but now there are more • Usually done by equals • Give as much traffic as receive • Private Peering • Commercial (private) • International peering is more limited (links are much more expensive)

  13. Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Model examples Interface : MESSAGES User Interacts with these FTP, Ping, HTTP, etc. Translation and encryption : MESSAGES Remote Procedural Calls (RPCs), Error Checking : MESSAGES Reliability, Error-checking : SEGMENTS end-to-end validity TCP Software Address, Routers : DATAGRAMS establishes routes (extends nodes…) IP Hardware Address, Bridges, Intelligent hubs, NICs, Error Checking : FRAMES node-to-node validity Ethernet, ATM Pins, Wires, Repeaters, RS-232, Volts, etc : BITS Deals with the medium SONET/SDH

  14. Ethernet • A standard for networking at Layer 2 • Based on physical hardware address (12 Hex numbers) • First started within the LAN • Started of as a shared bus (from the Aloha Packet Radio network – Bob Metcalf) • New versions are full-duplex, switched • Amenable for optical, longer reach • Graceful evolution (backwards compatible) between 10/100/1000 Mbps • Ethernet Frames are between 64 and 1518 bytes in size • IEEE is the standards body (802.xx working groups)

  15. Ethernet Operation (traditional) • Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Detect (CSMA/CD) • All machines wait to see if medium is free • If so, they transmit • Sometime, packets can collide • In that case, the transmitters wait a random period of time, and re-transmit • If yet another collision, will wait longer period of time (“exponential back-off”) • Limitations • Effective bandwidth was modest • Distances were limited • Non-duplex

  16. TCP/IP • Suite of protocols for networking • Based on logical address for devices • Most popular standard worldwide – built into most OS • Like most other packet switching, is • Connectionless • Statistical (non-deterministic) • No inherent Quality of Service (QoS) • Most of IP routing is unicast • Packets carry lots of information • Source Address, Destination Address, etc. • Special instructions such as priority • Port number (meaning application ID) • E.g., Port 80 - http

  17. IP Addresses • Each device connected needs a unique IP address • Exception is “private” IP addresses used within non-global networks • Home gateways can use this • Gateway “router” translates between public and private IP addresses • 32 bit addresses in current version (IPv4) • 4 8-bit portions • Dotted decimal is popular for convenience • 128.2.72.44 is same as 10000000.00000010.01001000. 00101100

  18. IP Addresses (cont.) • IP addresses have 2 portions, network and host • Networks are uniquely controlled. e.g, 128.2.x.y. is CMU’s network • Earlier, IP addresses were class-based to differentiate • Newer system is classless; can arbitrarily demarcate network and host • A.B.C.D/24 implies first 24 bits are for network portion • More efficient • “Subnet Mask” is used to identify network portion • Most people don’t own their own network; they take a portion from their service provider

  19. Network boundaries • LANs used to predominate • Old rule of thumb: 80% traffic inside 20% outside • Often were Layer 2 networks • “Intranet” • Can make an outside, non-global network • “Extranet” • Often using private (leased lines) • Outside world • Layer 3 connections (IP) • Many types of interconnections, e.g., varying by • Speed • Dial-up • Dedicated connection – Just a pipe to the “cloud” • Protocol • IP, IPX, Appletalk, etc.

  20. Routers • Forward packets based on destination address • They know the route to every network • Once the packet gets to the network gateway, it internally finishes the routing • Today’s Internet is roughly ~200,000+ routes in size (advertised prefixes [2006 estimate]) • Routing is done on a hop-by-hop basis • A routing table is built up in each router • Incoming packet’s destination address is looked up • A match is made, and the packet is forwarded to the appropriate port which gets it one step closer to the destination Incoming packet for 128.2.x.y 128.4.x.y Router A C Routing table knows which port (interface) is most closely connected to a particular network(s) D B 128.2.x.y 128.3.x.y

  21. IP Routing • Core Routing • Internet-sized routing tables • Optical interfaces • Edge Routing • Traditional edge players (aggregators) • Metropolitan Area Network/GigE edge players • Wide Area Networking is different from LAN, even though many protocols are the same • Access (Customer Edge) • Often the bottleneck • Earlier, relied on the ILEC (e.g., Verizon) • Now, new carriers want to bypass the ILECs • Often use new technologies and standards

  22. Communications Components • Transport • Now, typically optical, except the “last mile” • Termination • Different devices (typically) for different layers • Phones, Video-conf. phones, routers, modems, etc. • Switching • Cross Connects / Add-drop Multiplexers (ADMs) • Class 4/5 switches • IP switches (Routers)

  23. Network Intelligence • Quality-of-Service (QoS) • Today’s Internet is “best-effort” • Need to differentiate different packets • Issues of identification, authentication, and billing • Critics content some schemes amount to violation of Net Neutrality • Moving Intelligence to the Edge • Filtering, monitoring, and “differentiating” • Lets the core be super-fast • Security • Today’s internet is inherently insecure • Higher layers are used for security • E.g., SSL in browswers • New designs are being worked on for more security

  24. What do People Access in the “Last Mile?” • Voice • Video • Broadcast • Switched • Even On Demand • Broadband Internet Access • These are the TRIPLE PLAY

  25. (Mid 2000s) Predictions were p2p would only grow Something changed… …VIDEO (e.g., YouTube) What do People Access? Source: CacheLogic

  26. IPTV Bit Rates Source: http://www.dslprime.com/pix/cbrrates.jpg

  27. Broadband Access…The “Last Mile” • Different technologies are available • Cable • DSL • Fiber • Wireless • Fixed • Mobile • Satellite • Powerline • They differ in • Reach • Speeds • Costs • Regulation (?)

  28. FROM BROADCAST SOURCES Cable: Hybrid Fiber Coax (HFC) Active Node Home Headend Feeder (Fiber) Drop Loop Source: Marvin Sirbu

  29. FROM BROADCAST SOURCES ATM NETWORK Advanced Hybrid Fiber Coax Coaxial Termination Unit Active Node Home Headend HDT Feeder (Fiber) PSTN Drop Loop Source: Marvin Sirbu

  30. T PC 2-way amplifier Tap T CABLE MODEMS CMTS O/E O/E Video set top fiber node Head End T Spectral Use 10 BaseT IAP U P T V T V T V T V D O W N Cable Modem 750M 900M 0 50M Internet Backbone Frequency optoelectronics O/E Source: Stagg Newman

  31. DSL from Central Office Subscriber Premises Central Office ADSL Modem PC Voice Switch DSLAM Data carried above 4KHz voice frequencies Splitter Data Switch Telephone This simplification ignores the use of remote terminals and digital loop carrier (DLC) Source: Marvin Sirbu

  32. RDU RDU Fiber to the Neighborhood Central Distribution Drop Office Plant: Plant ADSL Manhole Fiber Optic Central Feeder Plant Inter-Office Office Trunking Local Access Network • Can go all the way to the home (FTTH) • Fiber can easily provide Gigabit speeds Source: Marvin Sirbu

  33. VDSL vs ADSL Source: http://www.comsoc.org/comsig/Slides/Oct2003_DSL_BernardDebbasch.pdf, Oct 2003

  34. Distance vs Bit Rate and Video Delivery Source: http://www.aware.com/products/dsl/bonded.htm

  35. Challenges with Wireless… • What prevents us from more wireless broadband? • Spectrum • Reach • Related to power levels • Line of Sight • Costs • Evolving standards and technologies • WiFi • Mesh, MIMO, etc. • WiMax • Fixed and Mobile • 3G, 4G, etc.

  36. Fixed Wireless Access– Inherently Shared • Base station • Point to Multipoint • Receivers • Rooftop • Indoors • Mobile/Portable • Shared bandwidth depends on technology • 25-40 Mbps downstream (might be) • 15-25 Mbps upstream • Spectrum matters • Unlicensed (UNI – 5 GHz) • Licensed (e.g., MMDS - 2.5 GHz)

  37. Transmitter Channel Combiner Receiver MMDS Fixed Wireless Architecture: Base Station and CPE Transceiver/Antenna Adapter Other MMDS channels Tower and Antenna (Base Station Outdoor Unit) Wireless Modem Unit Wireless Modem Termination System Transceiver/Antenna Router/ ATM switch Base Station Indoor Unit Wireless Modem Unit Fiber Backhaul To Distribution Hub Ethernet LAN • Sprint and MCI have purchased extensive MMDS licenses and will roll out in 40-60 markets over the next year. VoIP Adapter Small Business Source: Marvin Sirbu

  38. Customer Fixed Wireless Units • Typically, requires clearLine of Sight (LOS) • Except in small radius • This requires costly site visit to install antenna, run wiring to computer • Newer alternatives emerging (non-LOS) Source: Sprint (Hybrid Networks) (antenna/transceiver only)

  39. Base Station Equipment • A single tower can cover up to 20 mile radius • Depends on terrain • As subscribers increase, may need additional base stations/cells for frequency reuse Source: Sprint (Hybrid Networks- Phoenix)

  40. Wireless ISPs • There are several thousand Wireless ISPs (WISPs) in the U.S. • Easy because of light touch regulation • Spectrum • Antennae • Majority of WISPs use souped up wireless LAN technology • Normal WLAN coverage ~ few hundred feet • With directional antennas, coverage can reach several miles

  41. Wireless Mesh Networks • Popular for many city networks • Philadelphia, San Francisco, etc. • Major advantage • Issues of backhaul • Challenge • Shared throughput • Business model questions • Free vs. subsidized vs. at cost • Q: Can one share connectivity? • Open Access Points (mesh or non-mesh)?

  42. Antennas for Long Range WLANs Source: Cisco

  43. Broadband Policy Issues • Unanswered questions • Is there a “natural monopoly” in broadband? • Very low marginal costs in telecom • How can one support competition over broadband infrastructure? • Who should build broadband networks? • Public/Private • Market/Regulated • How do we define and pay for “Universal Service? • Thinking of layers or boundaries becomes important • Wholesale vs. retail • Physical vs. logical • Content vs. carriage

  44. What is changing? • Applications • Protocols • Peer2Peer – why is it popular • Size of files • New Killer apps • Where we access information • On the move

  45. Sometimes, it’s all About the $$

  46. Components of Connectivity Hardware / Installation Marketing / Advertising O&M Uplinking (transit fees) CRM Technical • Vary by location • Oversubscription ratios are an ISP choice • Speeds offered determine what applications can be run • Also depends on competition • Varies by technology • One time costs • Depends on competition • One-time capital costs are amortized over time • Cost depends on: • Interest rates • Churn • Re-usability of components

  47. What does it Cost to use up Bandwidth? StatisticalMultiplexing(oversubscription) $/Mbpstransit Number of userssharing a link Mbps uplinked $/month costper user to ISPfor uplinking Rated Bandwidth

  48. Different Bits are Different • Voice • Fixed • 23 $/month, 1 month/1923 min.  ~ 3,100 p$/bit • LD • $0.10/minute 26,000 p$/bit • Incl. International charges (FCC numbers) • Web (broadband user) • 35 $/month, 2 hours per day usage, 30 kbps average usage  ~ 5,400 p$/bit • TV (cable/satellite, excl. PPV) • 225 $/year/person, 2.58 persons/household, 850 hours/year watched  ~ 36 p$/bit • A good fraction of their revenues comes from advertising • BUT, we don’t know what demand will look from 5 years from now, or, say, under 100 Mbps conditions p$ = picodollars = 10-12 2002 or 2003 US Statistical Abstract Average Numbers except in Italics

  49. Digital Divide