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Biology 484 – Ethology Chapter 9 – Evolution of Communication. Chapter 9 Opener: When a bull elk bugles, other males listen. Communication can be between individuals, groups, or even different species. 9.1 The pseudopenis of the female spotted hyena can be erected.

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Biology 484 – Ethology

Chapter 9 – Evolution of Communication

chapter 9 opener when a bull elk bugles other males listen
Chapter 9 Opener: When a bull elk bugles, other males listen

Communication can be between individuals,

groups, or even different species.

9 1 the pseudopenis of the female spotted hyena can be erected
9.1 The pseudopenis of the female spotted hyena can be erected

The female spotted hyena displays her pseudopenis in an erect state as a form of greeting ceremony.

9 3 a cost of the pseudopenis for female spotted hyenas
9.3 A cost of the pseudopenis for female spotted hyenas

The pseudopenis in the female may be helpful in certain species specific forms of communication, but it results in a high cost associated with reproduction.

9 4 competition for food among spotted hyenas may favor highly aggressive individuals
9.4 Competition for food among spotted hyenas may favor highly aggressive individuals

In a comparison of the extra androgen hypothesis and the aggression hypothesis,

the aggression hypothesis is currently best supported.

9 5 dominance greatly advances female reproductive success in the spotted hyena
9.5 Dominance greatly advances female reproductive success in the spotted hyena

The higher the mother’s social status, the greater the survival of her offspring.

9 6 ultrasonic communication
9.6 Ultrasonic communication

The male whistling moth communicates via ultrasonic calls produced by striking hard, knobby “castanet” wing structures together.

9 7 evolution of a sensory system
9.7 Evolution of a sensory system

The area of the sensory nerve labeled as “b1” shows the difference between the two moths.

The saturniid “b1” innervates to relay information about the hindwing.

The noctuid moth, which *can* hear, uses the “b1” to innervate to the tympanic membrane to conduct vibratory sound to the CNS.

9 8 arthropod gills have evolved into many different structures with different functions part 1
9.8 Arthropod gills have evolved into many different structures with different functions (Part 1)
9 8 arthropod gills have evolved into many different structures with different functions part 2
9.8 Arthropod gills have evolved into many different structures with different functions (Part 2)
9 9 evolutionary precursors of insect wings
9.9 Evolutionary precursors of insect wings?

This extinct insect (a stonefly like insect) may be providing a clue to how the gill plates may have evolved into wings in many forms of insects.

9 10 a surface skimming stonefly
9.10 A surface-skimming stonefly

This particular species of stonefly displays wings, but the wins are not for flight in the traditional sense. Instead, it uses the wings somewhat like how we use a sail on a sailboat. It is used to capture wind and propel the insect along the surface.

9 11 a possible evolutionary pathway from swimming to full flight in the stoneflies
9.11 A possible evolutionary pathway from swimming to full flight in the stoneflies

Different species of stonefly with different possible velocities show a possible mechanism for evolution of flight.

9 12 an ancestral signal has been co opted in some bowerbirds
9.12 An ancestral signal has been co-opted in some bowerbirds

“Skraa” is the signal that originated for aggression but has been used for other activities as well in some species.

9 13 sensory exploitation and the evolution of a courtship signal in neumania papillator
9.13 Sensory exploitation and the evolution of a courtship signal in Neumania papillator

The water mite female sits in a predatory position while the male moves its leg to create vibrations like a prey item.

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9.15 A female cichlid fish (left) is attracted to the anal fin of a male by the orange spots on the fin
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Parental Care Behaviors in the convict cichlid, Chiclosoma nigrofasciatum:

Mouthing

Spitting

Finding

Digging

Feeding

Aggressive Behavior to Mate

Attack Conspecifics

Fanning

Hovering

None of the Above

9 23 a group of ravens feeding on a carcass to which they were attracted by a yelling companion
9.23 A group of ravens feeding on a carcass to which they were attracted by a yelling companion
9 28 the european cuckoo chick s begging call matches that of four baby reed warblers part 1
9.28 The European cuckoo chick’s begging call matches that of four baby reed warblers (Part 1)
9 28 the european cuckoo chick s begging call matches that of four baby reed warblers part 2
9.28 The European cuckoo chick’s begging call matches that of four baby reed warblers (Part 2)