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Classical Music

Classical Music

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Classical Music

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Presentation Transcript

  1. Is it for the common man? Classical Music Fanfare for the Common Man by Aaron Copland

  2. Presentation The idea of this presentation is to bring classical music alive for you X A history lesson?

  3. A Short History of Classical Music We are talking about Western music, principally European

  4. Definition By Classical Music, we mean serious music, not the music of the people

  5. Origins Classical music was for many centuries centred around court and church

  6. Evolution of Classical Music • History of European art music • Early / Medieval (500 – 1400) • Renaissance (1400 – 1600) • Baroque (1600 – 1750) • Classical (1730 – 1820) • Early Romantic (1815 – 1850) • Late Romantic (1850 – 1910) • 20th century (1900 – 2000) • Contemporary (1945 – present) Classical music has evolved through a succession of artistic movements

  7. Structure of Music At its most basic, music is a series of single notes of different pitch Pop goes the Weasel

  8. Major & Minor Scales • Western music is generally written in keys, eg A major, C minor • of the 12 semitones in an octave, only 7 are used in any one key

  9. Chords and Harmony • A major chord uses the 1st, 3rd & 5th note of the octave • C major uses C, E & G • this is harmony C major

  10. Monophonic • Early Music • Plainsong • Gregorian Chant • play

  11. Polyphonic • madrigals • motets • church music • many Italians • play Palestrina (1525 – 1594) Allegri (1582 – 1652)

  12. Baroque • the Germans & the Italians • Purcell in UK • more ornate • use of continuum – harpsichord or organ • play J S Bach (1685 – 1750) Vivaldi (1678 – 1741)

  13. Classical Period • the Austrians • wrote in a formal, elegant style • emphasis on structure • employed by patrons • play Haydn (1732-1809) Mozart (1756-1791)

  14. Early Romantics Beethoven (1770 – 1827) • German symphonists • broke the classical mould • found freer modes of expression • concentrated on individuality • play Schubert (1797 – 1828) Mendelsohn (1809 – 1847) Schumann (1810-1856)

  15. Still the Romantic Period • Italian Grand Opera • long tradition in Italy • bel canto • full of passion & tragedy • play Rossini (1792 – 1868) Verdi 1813 – 1901) Puccini (1858 – 1924)

  16. Late Romantics • Germans, Russians and Austrians • bigger and bigger • over the top • play Wagner (1813 – 1883) Tchaikovsky (1840 – 1893) Mahler (1860 – 1911)

  17. 20th Century • out with the old • away from keys • discord & dissonance • anything goes • play

  18. New Musical Language • breaking the mould – again • the French Impressionists • no regular rhythms • play Debussy (1862 – 1918) Ravel (1875 – 1937)

  19. English Music • revival after inactivity • national identity • incorporating folk tradition • play Elgar (1857-1934) Vaughan Williams (1872 – 1943)

  20. Eastern Europeans • strong, masculine rhythms • unusual time signatures • folk influence • ballet • play Bartok (1881 – 1945) Stravinsky (1882 – 1971) Prokofiev (1891 – 1953)

  21. Post World War 2 • avant garde • experimentation • pots & pans • non-music for the elite? • like modern art in music • play

  22. A return to music? • reaction to avant garde & experimenters • recognisable as music • still modern, new & exciting • play John Tavener (with Bjork) (b 1944) Karl Jenkins (b 1944)

  23. Classical Music for All • not elitist • something for everyone • no barriers to overcome • just try it • play