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Year 12 Revision Day 2015

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  1. Year 12 Revision Day 2015

  2. Area of Study Discovery

  3. Let's all discover

  4. let's all discover • •What’s something you have realised about discovery from viewing this text? (1 minute) • •Generate a thesis statement around these ideas and share

  5. In a man's life

  6. in a mAN'S LIFE • •What’s something you have realised about discovery from viewing this text? (1 minute) • •Generate a thesis statement around these ideas and share

  7. Landrover Discovery Advertisement

  8. discovery SCENARIO A surprising discovery that results from a lie • There must be something at stake • Write a paragraph summary • Conference and pitch your ideas on a 1 slide PowerPoint

  9. tHE rEADING TASK Text One Image (2009), Image (2010), Collage image (2011), Book cover (2012), Image (2013), Media Release (2014) Text Two Poem (2009), Nonfiction extract (2010), Discussion Transcript (2011), Poem (2012), Poem (2013), Non-Fiction Extract (2014) Text Three Prose extract (2009), Nonfiction extract (2010), Nonfiction extract (2011), Nonfiction extract (2012), Memoir extract (2013), Fiction Extract (2014) Text Four Non-fiction extract (2009), Poem (2010), Fiction extract (2011), Memoir extract (2012), Prose extract (2013), Nil (2014)

  10. The Visual Explain how the visual reinforces the main issue being raised by the infographic about reinvention (3 marks)

  11. Prose Extract Read the prose extract and answer the following question: Explain the writer’s use of sensory imagery in evoking the concept of discovery. State of Wonder - This question is asks you to identify particular language usage and styles that create the idea of the character discover the landscape. You must identify the language usage and then explain how it creates its particular meaning and effect

  12. Poem Read the poem and answer the following question How do verbs and use of the personal voice evoke a strong sense of the persona’s quest to discover new possibilities? ‘The New Experience' by Suzanne Buffam

  13. the final question A balanced well-supported answer is required to achieve full marks. Try not to repeat points you have already made in earlier answers. You need to think about the content and form of each text when choosing which one you will write about. Look at what the question is asking you to do – analyse, compare, discuss, justify.

  14. tips to enrich your creative writing Use a moment in time, rather than an extended time period. Plan your structure, the opening and conclusion – a circular or elliptical structure can cure a failure to produce a strong conclusion. Show don’t tell. Avoid too much information and focus on appealing to the senses through effective descriptions. Develop a strong, distinctive voice. To achieve this it is advantageous to write about what you have experienced. Choose and control a range of language features and poetic devices. Use a variety of sentence beginnings and sentence lengths. Vary your paragraph lengths – don’t be afraid to use a single sentence paragraph to make a dramatic statement. Create tension and contrast. Have engaging first and last lines.

  15. tips continued Think about your characters who move in the setting, your key ideas, your purpose and how you are representing your perception of belonging. Zoom into your setting and focus on the details. Let your reader see the setting. This will not happen if you skim over the details. So much can be revealed when you do this. It could be a close-up on a photograph, a locket, a window, a mirror etc. Ensure your readers can ‘see’ the setting

  16. section iii Candidates showed strength in these areas: • demonstrating understanding of how their selected texts reflected the question • selecting related texts that complemented the ideas explored in their prescribed text • demonstrating an understanding of the notion of discovery • choosing detailed textual references to support their thesis • structuring an argument that reinforced the ideas established in the thesis and maintaining this throughout the response. Candidates need to improve in these areas: • deconstructing a question in order to respond to all aspects of the question • not relying on recount or paraphrasing to highlight aspects of their selected texts • establishing clear and explicit connections between texts • explaining the effect of features in terms of shaping ideas relevant to the questions, rather than just listing techniques • sustaining a focus on the question throughout the entirety of the response by making clear and purposeful links to the question.

  17. a message from Michael gow • The notion of children dying before their parents is huge. So it struck a chord – but with laughter and fun and madness in the face of it. And translating into a theatricality which says- Life is tough, but let’s have a bit of fun. Let’s run amok. • http://splash.abc.net.au/home#!/media/1974953/finding-closure-michael-gow-away

  18. module b Module Statement This module requires students to engage in detailed analysis of a text. It develops students’ understanding of how the ideas, forms and language of a text interact within the text and may affect those responding to it.

  19. past hsc questions • 2014 Explore how Owen’s use of dramatic imagery highlights the carnage and destruction of war. In your response, make detailed reference to the extract from ‘Mental Cases’ and ONE other poem set for study. • 2013 Owen’s poems present the reader with a powerful exploration of the impact of human cruelty on individuals. How does Owen achieve this in his poetry? In your response, make detailed reference to your prescribed text. • 2012 How does Owen’s portrayal of the relationship between youth and war move us to a deeper understanding of suffering? In your response, make detailed reference to at least TWO poems set for study.

  20. 2011 Discuss how Owen’s perspective on human conflict is conveyed in his poetry. In your response, make detailed reference to at least TWO poems set for study. • 2010 How does this extract from ‘Dulce Et Decorum Est’ introduce us to the important ideas in Owen’s poetry? In your response, make detailed reference to at least TWO of the poems set for study. • 2009 Wilfred Owen’s poetry is shaped by an intense focus on extraordinary human experiences. Select TWO poems set for study and explore Owen’s portrayal of suffering and pity.

  21. context • http://www.smashthehsc.com/wwi.html

  22. key ideas In your responses you will need to link your arguments to the question. The key ideas should allow you to do this. death and suffering satire of honour and patriotism associated with war consequences of war dehumanising nature of death in battle

  23. Techniques • You need to know the techniques that are in ALL of the poems set for study

  24. module a: experience through language • Elective Two - Distinctively Visual • Core Text - Run Lola Run

  25. module statement This module requires students to explore the uses of a particular aspect of language. It develops students’ awareness of language and helps them understand how our perceptions of and relationships with others and the world are shaped in written, spoken and visual language. Elective 2: Distinctively Visual In their responding and composing students explore the ways the images we see and/or visualise in texts are created. Students consider how the forms and language of different texts create these images, affect interpretation and shape meaning. Students examine one prescribed text, in addition to other texts providing examples of the distinctively visual.

  26. past hsc questions 2009 Discuss how the distinctively visual conveys distinctive experiences in Run Lola Run and ONE other related text of your own choosing. 2010 Compare the ways the distinctively visual is created in Run Lola Run and in ONE other related text of your own choosing. 2011 In what ways are people and their experiences brought to life through the distinctively visual? In your response, make detailed reference to your prescribed text and at least ONE other related text of your own choosing. 2012 Interesting views on society are conveyed by the distinctively visual. Explore how this is achieved in your prescribed text and ONE other related text of your own choosing. 2013 How does the use of the distinctively visual emphasise the ways that individuals respond to significant aspects of life? In your response, make detailed reference to your prescribed text and ONE other related text of your own choosing 2014 How do the qualities of distinctive images create interest and draw us into the experiences of others? In your response, refer to your prescribed text and ONE other related text of your own choosing.

  27. What is the distinctively visual? The distinctively visual is used by composers to emphasise specific aspects of the worlds created within a text. The distinctively visual also helps us understand how our perceptions of and relationships with others and the world are shaped.

  28. A word from tom tykwer ‘Cinema that interests me is cinema about openings, unresolved questions and experiments; cinema that explores the possibilities offered by narrative and by associations, without refusing chaos, chance, destiny or the unexpected.’ Tom Tykwer Tykwer has said that he wants to make films that “attempt to define the contradictions of existence and which experiment on both thematic and formal fronts”.

  29. Tykwer and the distinctively visual Tykwer uses the distinctively visual to emphasise the importance of the ideas in his text. He uses film techniques to create the distinctively visual. Tykwer uses colours to convey his ideas. Red to represent Lola and yellow to represent Manni. Red is a motif throughout the film and signifies action. Yellow represents Manni’s cowardice. Manni is static throughout the film. Run Lola Run is an action film. Tykwer subverts (changes) the action genre by having Lola as the hero and Manni as the one needing to be rescued. This is why Lola is connected to red and Manni connected to yellow. Lola distinctively moves the action in the film. The action of the film takes places on the streets of Berlin, quite a regular setting. This further highlights Lola’s distinctive qualities. She is extra-ordinary in the setting (her powers, her hair, her costume, her running, her influence on the fate of others). The animation also allows Tykwer to present Lola’s run like a game – a distinctive feature of the film. Repetition/motifs of time. Time is a controlling influence for Lola (and us, the audience). She runs against and challenges time and the constraints it presents

  30. Camera angles position the audience within the action of the film. This use of the distinctively visual allows Tykwer to emphasise the importance of the ideas (love, chance, time etc) to our own lives. The camera angles also allow us to visualise the urgency of Lola’s run. The sound/music resembles the ticking of a clock to once again emphasise Lola’s run against time. The music also reinforces the urgency of Lola’s run. Lighting is used by Tykwer in the red filter scenes. Lola’s distinctive features blend in as a result of the red filter. This use of the distinctively visual allows Tykwer to focus on the questioning that occurs in this scene and its relevance to Lola’s run. This is further reinforced by the spirals on the bed sheets and the lack of non-diegetic sound. The responder is made aware through this use of the distinctively visual that it is Lola’s fate to return to Manni and she must run again for a more favourable outcome. The structure of the film is also distinctive. It directly contrasts traditional film narrative structure and further emphasises the distinctive nature of Lola’s run. By repeating Lola’s run three times the importance of the key ideas are also emphasised as Lola responds to love, time, fate and chance.

  31. key ideas • Time • Love • Fate and chance • The importance of Lola

  32. related texts • Always have a back up! • Make sure you focus on the distinctively visual and HOW it is used.

  33. Module C: Texts and Society Elective Two: Exploring Transitions Core Text: The Story of Tom Brennan

  34. Module statement Module Statement This module requires students to explore and analyse texts used in a specific situation. It assists students’ understanding of the ways that texts communicate information, ideas, bodies of knowledge, attitudes and belief systems in ways particular to specific areas of society. Elective Two: Exploring Transitions In this elective, students explore and analyse a variety of texts that portray the ways in which individuals experience transitions into new phases of life and social contexts. These transitions may be challenging, confronting, exciting or transformative and may result in growth, change and a range of consequences for the individual and others. Through exploring their prescribed text and other related texts of their own choosing, students consider how transitions can result in new knowledge and ideas, shifts in attitudes and beliefs, and a deepened understanding of the self and others. Students respond to and compose a range of texts that expand our understanding of the experience of venturing into new worlds.

  35. Past hsc questions • 2009 Individuals venturing into new experiences may encounter obstacles, but may also gain significant rewards. Do you agree with this perspective? In your response, refer to your prescribed text and at least ONE other related text of your own choosing. • 2010 ‘The experience of moving into the world can challenge individuals’ attitudes and beliefs.’ Discuss this view with reference to your prescribed text and at least ONE other related text of your own choosing. • 2011 Explain how The Story of Tom Brennan and ONE other related text of your own choosing portray the consequences of moving into the world. • 2012 The experience of moving into the world both limits and extends individual freedom. Discuss this view with reference to The Story of Tom Brennan and ONE other related text of your own choosing. • 2013 Explain how moving into the world opens up new phases of life and influences the ways people interact with one another. In your response, refer to your prescribed text and ONE other related text of your own choosing • 2014 Individuals venturing into new experiences struggle to balance their personal values with the expectations of the broader world. In what ways is this struggle explored in your prescribed text and ONE other related text?

  36. a word from J c burke Early on in the process of thinking about the story I knew I wanted to tell it in the viewpoint of the younger brother. ‘The innocent bystander’, the one who’s done nothing wrong but still has to suffer the consequences. To me, this was a more interesting viewpoint to look out from.

  37. Exploring transitions Transitions are a process. This process or transition involves the following: - Relationships - Facing challenges - Guidance - Choices - Acceptance - Identity As demonstrated in The Story of Tom Brennan, the process of transformation is different for each individual.

  38. techniques • When discussing and analysing the idea of Into the World in J.C Burke’s The Story of Tom Brennan you should refer to the following techniques: • Narrative structure • Narration • Motif • Imagery • Setting • Characterisation

  39. examples from the text • Relationships – Tom’s relationship with Chrissy, Daniel, Brendan, Kylie, Gran, the football team at Bennie’s. • Guidance – Provided by characters, the town of Coghill, Gran’s saints. • Facing challenges – Tom running up the hills, the letter from Nicole’s family, the consequences of Daniel’s accident.

  40. Choices – The Brennan’s choice to leave Mumbilli, Kylie’s choice to deliver her speech on ‘domestic terrorism’, Daniel’s choice to get in the car, Tom’s choice to run with Brendan. • Acceptance – Tom’s acceptance of Fin’s quadriplegia, acceptance of the past. • Identity – Tom’s new identity separate from Daniel, the entire Brennan family’s new identity in Coghill.

  41. related texts • Then by Morris Gleitzman • Drifters by Bruce Dawe • Egg by Michael Leunig MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A BACK UP!!