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Calculating the Contribution to the Food Components: Recipes

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  1. Calculating the Contribution to the Food Components: Recipes Webinar February 12, 2014

  2. Brought to You By: Recipes

  3. Purpose of the Webinar • Reinforce the importance of meeting the meal pattern with standardized recipes • Learn why we calculate the contribution of foods in a standardized recipe toward the food components • Show the steps to correctly credit the ingredients in standardized recipes to the food components Recipes

  4. Organization of the Webinar Tools to Document the Contribution of Foods to the Meal Pattern Calculating the Creditable Contribution of Ingredients in Recipes Example Recipe Calculation Changing Ingredients or the Contribution of an Ingredient Summary Recipes

  5. Tools to Document the Contribution of Foods Recipes

  6. Tools for Crediting Food Components • Food Buying Guide • Nutrition Facts Label • Child Nutrition (CN) Label • Product Formulation Statement (PFS) • Standardized Recipe

  7. Tools for Crediting Food Components • The Food Buying Guide (FBG) is the basis for calculating the contribution of: • Individual foods • Standardized recipes • Processed convenience foods with product formulation statements Recipes

  8. Food Buying Guide The Food Buying Guide (FBG) is being revised. Sections completed are: Meat/Meat Alternates Vegetables/Fruits To download the latest edition of the revised sections, go to: http://origin.www.fns.usda.gov/tn/resources/fbg_schoolmeals.html Recipes

  9. Food Buying Guide Used to determine: Amount of food to purchase Amount to prepare Amount to serve, or serving size Divided into sections: Introduction Meats/Meat Alternates Vegetables/Fruits (same section, but separate) Grains/Breads (now called Grains) Milk Other Foods Appendices Recipes

  10. Food Buying Guide Information in the columns: Specific information on the type and form. Purchase unit for the type and form. Number of servings in each purchase unit. Serving size to provide component credit. Amount to purchase for 100. Edible portion after peeling, cooking, drained or otherwise converted from Column 1 form. Recipes

  11. Food Buying Guide Example:Contribution of Leafy Greens Remember when looking at leafy greens, they credit as ½ the volume Remember when you serve with dressing, the yield in Col. 3 changes Recipes

  12. It’s not in the Food Buying Guide! If a vegetable or fruit is not in the FGB: • Prepare the item as it will be served • Measure the volume for the quantity to be served • Determine the AP amount required to provide that contribution • Document your process and use that AP quantity in your recipe

  13. Food Buying Guide Calculator A calculator tool has been developed by the National Food Service Management Institute that can save you time and effort. http://Fbg.nfsmi.org/ Recipes

  14. Tools for Crediting Food Components • Nutrition Facts labels specify the weight of the serving size, particularly for grains and breads, and allow us to use the FBG to determine the contribution of the item. Recipes

  15. Tools for Crediting Food Components • Child Nutrition (CN) labels are issued by USDA and warranty the contribution of the product. A CN label will always contain the following: • The CN logo (which is a distinct border) • The meal pattern contribution statement • A 6-digit product identification number • USDA/FNS authorization statement • The month and year of approval. Recipes

  16. Tools for Crediting Food Components A Product Formulation Statement (PFS) gives us the information to determine the contribution of the ingredients by using the FBG. Recipes

  17. Tools for Crediting Food Components Standardized recipes give the serving size, yield, and list the ingredient information needed to apply the FBG to calculate the contribution of those ingredients. Recipes

  18. Standardized Recipes Standardized recipes have the following parts: Recipe name Recipe category Number of the recipe (Optional) Ingredient list Weight and/or measure of ingredients Alternate ingredients or recipe variations (Optional) Directions for preparation Recipes

  19. Standardized Recipes Standardized recipes have the following parts: Cooking temperature Time for cook, prep, assembly HACCP Critical Control Points Pan, container size, or special equipment Portion size and tool for serving Number of servings Contribution to the meal pattern Recipe yield in weight or volume • Other Optional Parts: Nutrients and Marketing guide • Blank forms can be downloaded from http://www.education.ne.gov/ns/forms/nslpforms/Recipes.html Recipes

  20. Calculating the Creditable Contribution of Ingredients in Recipes Recipes

  21. RecipesWhen to calculate the contribution of foods USDA recipe is revised School recipe is developed School recipe is revised New recipe is used from outside source Recipes

  22. Food Buying Guide Appendix A: Recipe Analysis Use to calculate the contribution of ingredients in recipes. Watch for a new release. Check out the CDE Excel template that can be used instead of paper and pencil.

  23. Recipe Analysis Steps • List ingredients. • Record AP weight or volume. • Record purchase units. • Record the number of servingsper purchase unit. • Calculate the M/MA contribution. • Calculate the V and F contribution. • Calculate the G contribution. • Record the portions per recipe. • Record the final rounded downcalculated crediting answers.

  24. Recipe Analysis Step 1: List the Ingredients

  25. Your Recipe Name Your#

  26. Your Recipe Name Your#

  27. Recipe Analysis Step 2: Enter the quantity of each Ingredient “as purchased”

  28. Your# Your Recipe Name

  29. Recipe Analysis Step 3: Enter the purchase unit of the ingredients

  30. Your Recipe Name Your#

  31. Recipe Analysis Step 4: Enter the servings per purchase unit from the FBG

  32. Your Recipe Name Your#

  33. Recipe Analysis Step 5: Calculate the M/MA

  34. Your# Your Recipe Name

  35. Recipe Analysis Step 6: Calculate the V and F

  36. Your# Your Recipe Name

  37. Your# Your Recipe Name

  38. Recipe Analysis Step 7: Calculate the G

  39. Your# Your Recipe Name

  40. Recipe Analysis Steps 8 and 9: Totals calculated, portions entered, and portion contribution calculated

  41. Example Recipe Calculation Recipes

  42. Orange Couscous Salad RecipeContribution to the Fruits Component Recipes

  43. Orange Couscous Salad RecipeWhere’s the Fruit? • The recipe contains canned mandarin oranges, raisins and lemon juice, but the contribution is not listed. For 100 servings: • 6 lbs. of drained mandarin oranges • .61 lb yield per lb x 7.3 servings/lb = 4.45 servings/lb drained • 6 lbs. x 4.45 servings/lb. = 26.7 – ¼ cups • 2 quarts of raisins • 2 quarts = 2 x 4 c x 4 – ¼ c = 32 – ¼ cups • Credits as 2 x quantity = 2 x 32 = 64 – ¼ cups Recipes

  44. Orange Couscous Salad Recipe Where’s the Fruit? • 3 cups of lemon juice • 3 cups = 3 x 4- ¼ cups = 12 – ¼ cups • Total of all Fruits • 26.70 + 64 + 12 = 102.7 • Divide by 100 servings = 1.02 – ¼ cups • Round down to ¼ cup Fruits per serving Recipes

  45. Orange Couscous Salad RecipeKeep checking: Vegetables • 13 lbs. Chickpeas (Beans, Garbanzo), drained • 13 lbs. x 16 oz. = 3.04 #10 cans 68.4 oz. yield per Col. 6 • 3 #10 cans x 42 servings per #10 can = 126 – ¼ cup which rounds down to: • 1 oz eq M/MA or • ¼ cup Dry Beans/Peas Vegetable

  46. Orange Couscous Salad RecipeKeep checking: Vegetables • 7 cups Diced Onion • 7 cups x 4 – ¼ cups per cup = 28 – ¼ cup servings • Or to convert the recipe to pounds of whole onions to use: • 28 – ¼ cups= 3.01 lb - round down to 3 lb 9.30 - ¼ cups per lb • 3 lb x 9.30 = 27.9 – ¼ cups, which we must round down to 27 – ¼ cups

  47. Orange Couscous Salad RecipeKeep checking: Vegetables • Total of all Vegetables (counting chickpeas as a vegetable) • 126 + 27 = 153 – ¼ cup servings for 100 • Divide by 100 servings = 1.53 – ¼ cups • 1.53 x .25 = .382 cups • Round down to .375 or 3/8 cup vegetables per serving

  48. Orange Couscous Salad RecipeKeep checking: Grain • The recipe contains couscous, whole wheat, dry and the contribution is listed a 1 grain/bread, or 1 oz eq. For 100 servings: • 5 quarts of couscous, dry, Group H, 1 oz eq = ½ cup cooked • 5 qt x 4 = 8.42 lbs • 2.375 cups/lb • 8.42 lbs. x 14.5- ½ cup servings/lb. = 122.09 – ½ cups • 122.09 ÷ 100 = 1.22 – ½ cups • Round down to ½ cup = 1 oz eq Recipes

  49. Orange Couscous Salad RecipeWhat Did We Learn? • Validate before you use an outside source recipe! • Write the information on the recipe • Sign and date it