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Mound Builders. Earliest Inhabitants. Mound Builders. During the late prehistoric period (approx. 700 to 1200 CE), groups of people from Georgia to Oklahoma and Minnesota to Texas built mounds ceremonial purposes, including burying their dead

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Earliest inhabitants

Mound Builders

Earliest Inhabitants


Mound builders
Mound Builders

  • During the late prehistoric period (approx. 700 to 1200 CE), groups of people from Georgia to Oklahoma and Minnesota to Texas built mounds ceremonial purposes, including burying their dead

  • These groups hunted and gathered for food, and raised or tended corn, squash, and beans; these groups also had complex societies and trade networks


Spiro mounds
Spiro Mounds

One of the largest known prehistoric cemeteries in North America is sited at Spiro, with more than 750 burials dated between 850-1450 CE. It has at least 15 mounds and a village of rectangular houses.

During the 1930s, excavations found grave goods found at Spiro

The village around Spiro’s mound center grew but the center did not; by 1450 the population moved on


Elaborate trade
Elaborate Trade

  • Archeologists have found artifacts from other prehistoric North American cultures which lend evidence to their elaborate trade networks