CHAPTER 29 PLANT DIVERSITY I: HOW PLANTS COLONIZED LAND - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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CHAPTER 29 PLANT DIVERSITY I: HOW PLANTS COLONIZED LAND
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CHAPTER 29 PLANT DIVERSITY I: HOW PLANTS COLONIZED LAND

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  1. CHAPTER 29 PLANT DIVERSITY I: HOW PLANTS COLONIZED LAND 1. Evolutionary adaptations to terrestrial living characterize the four main groups of land plants 2. Charophyceans are the green algae most closely related to land plants 3. Several terrestrial adaptations distinguish land plants from charophycean algae

  2. Land plants (including the sea grasses) evolved from a certain green algae, called charophyceans. • Lines of evidence supporting the phylogenetic connection between land plants and green algae, especially the charophyceans, include: • homologous chloroplasts, • homologous cell walls (cellulose), • homologous peroxisomes, • Phragmoplasts (associated with cell division plates), • homologous sperm (with flagella) • molecular systematics (DNA analysis). • multicellular, eukaryotic, photosynthetic autrotrophs

  3. Apical meristems - continuous growth in tips of shoot/root -keep reaching for resources; ‘ Lignin - hardens cell walls of wood to make it taller - also to reach for resources Root hairs to acquire water; Xylem and phloem - vascular bundles to get water up, sugars down to the stem/roots; Water conservation - cuticle on leaves; sporangia protects spores and the spores have layers surrounding them,;embryos are protected inside female parent (also for resources); opening and closing of stomata Plants produce bitter compounds, odors, toxins to defend from predators (herbivores) Flavinoids absorb UV radiation 7) Spores and Pollen grains - wind /insect dispersal and in the higher plant sperm does not need water to swim up to the egg Movement to land - Land = dryness; resources are in different parts - water underground, CO2 and light above ground; different stress factors

  4. Movement to land - the journey, some pix #1) apical meristems -continually dividing and undifferentiated cells at the tips of roots and shoots - that can form various tissues - “reach out” to get resources #4) multicellular embryos develop from zygotes that are retained by the female plant for nutrition

  5. #3) Except for bryophytes, land plants have true roots, stems, and leaves, which are defined by the presence of vascular tissues. Vascular tissue transports materials among these organs. Tube-shaped cells, called xylem, carry water and minerals up from roots. When functioning, these cells are dead, with only their walls providing a system of microscopic water pipes. Phloem is a living tissue in which nutrient-conducting cells arranged into tubes distribute sugars, amino acids, and other organic products.

  6. Movement to land the journey in pix #4) Multicellular organs, called sporangia, are found on the sporophyte and produce these spores. Within a sporangia, diploid spore mother cells undergo meiosis and generate haploid spores. The outer tissues of the sporangium protect the developing spores until they are ready to be released into the air. Fig. 29.8

  7. Movement to land - the journey - some pix #4) Land plants have spores with sporopollenin like green algae that prevents drying.

  8. #4) Pores- stomata, in the epidermis of leaves allow the exchange of carbon dioxide and oxygen between the outside air and the leaf interior. Stomata are also the major sites for water to exit from leaves via evaporation. Changes in the shape of the cells bordering the stomata can close the pores to minimize water loss in hot, dry conditions.

  9. #4) In most land plants, the epidermis of leaves and other aerial parts is coated with a cuticle of polyesters and waxes. The cuticle protects the plant from microbial attack. The wax acts as waterproofing to prevent excessive water loss. Fig. 29.10

  10. Movement to land - the journey alternation of generations - All land plants show alternation of generations in which two multicellular body forms (gametophyte/gametangia and sporophyte/sporangia) alternate. Sporophyte is diploid (2n) and produces walled spores (haploid) by MEIOSIS Spores form multicellulae GAMETOPHYTE (n) - archegonia (female) and antheridia (male) that produce gametes (n) - egg and sperm Fertilization of egg by sperm produces diploid zygote (2n) that divides by MITOSIS to form a multicellular SPOROPHYTE

  11. The relative size and complexity of the sporophyte and gametophyte depend on the plant group. In bryophytes, the gametophyte is the “dominant” generation, larger and more conspicuous than the sporophyte. In pteridophytes, gymnosperms, and angiosperms, the sporophyte is the dominant generation. For example, the fern plant that we typically see is the diploid sporophyte, while the gametophyte is a tiny plant on the forest floor.

  12. The evolutionary novelties of the first land plants opened an expanse of terrestrial habitat previously occupied by only films of bacteria. The new frontier was spacious. The bright sunlight was unfiltered by water and algae. The atmosphere had an abundance of carbon dioxide. The soil was rich in mineral nutrients. At least at first, there were relatively few herbivores or pathogens.

  13. Skip this:The traditional scheme includes only the bryophytes, pteridophytes, gymnosperms, and angiosperms in the kingdom Plantae. Others expand the boundaries to include charophyceans and some relatives in the kingdom Streptophyta. Still others include all chlorophytes in the kingdom Viridiplantae. Fig. 29.14

  14. There are four main groups of land plants: bryophytes, pteridophytes, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. The most common bryophytes are mosses. The pteridophytes include ferns. The gymnosperms include pines and other conifers. The angiosperms are the flowering plants. 1. Evolutionary adaptations to terrestrial living characterize the four main groups of land plants

  15. There are four main groups of land plants: bryophytes, pteridophytes, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. A seed consists of a plant embryo packaged along with a food supply within a protective coat. Bryophytes and Pteridophytes have spores that help disperse the plants PTERIDOPHYTES = fern (vascular bundles but no seeds) BRYOPHYTES = moss (no vascular bundles)

  16. There are four main groups of land plants: bryophytes, pteridophytes, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. Evolutionary adaptations to terrestrial living characterize the four main groups of land plants GYMNOSPERMS = vascular bundle and naked seed (no ovaries) ANGIOSPERM = flowering plants with seeds inside ovaries - (fruits)

  17. Fig. 29.1

  18. Four great episodes in the evolution of land plants: The origin of bryophytes from algal ancestors. The origin and diversification of vascular plants. The origin of seeds. The evolution of flowers.

  19. CHAPTER 29 PLANT DIVERSITY I: HOW PLANTS COLONIZED LAND Section C1: Bryophytes - Mosses 1. The three phyla of bryophytes are mosses, liverworts, and hornworts 2. The gametophyte is the dominant generation in the life cycles of bryophytes

  20. Bryophytes are represented by three phyla (skip this): phylum Hepatophyta - liverworts phylum Anthocerophyta - hornworts phylum Bryophyta - mosses Note, the name Bryophyta refers only to one phylum, but the informal term bryophyte refers to all nonvascular plants. 1. The three phyla of bryophytes are mosses, liverworts, and hornworts Fig. 29.15

  21. Figure 29.16 The life cycle of Polytrichum, a moss (Layer 1)

  22. Figure 29.16 The life cycle of Polytrichum, a moss (Layer 2)

  23. Figure 29.16 The life cycle of Polytrichum, a moss (Layer 3)

  24. 2. The gametophyte is the dominant generation in the life cycles of bryophytes

  25. Bryophytes held to the ground by rhizoids (no vascular bundle, so not roots). Stem and leaves also have no vascular bundles…, no cuticle on leaf Gametophytes are thin - 1 cell layer and need to be close to water for sperm to swim over…. Mosses are short in height because no supporting tissues - vascular bundles or lignin

  26. Moss sporophytes consist of a foot, an elongated stalk (the seta), and a sporangium (the capsule). The foot gathers nutrients and water from the parent gametophyte via transfer cells. The stalk conducts these materials to the capsule. In most mosses, theseta becomes elongated,elevating the capsuleand enhancing sporedispersal. Fig. 29.16x

  27. Figure 29.16x Moss life cycle

  28. Figure 29.x1 Polytrichum moss leaf section

  29. Figure 29.17 Sporophyte of Marchantia, a liverwort

  30. Figure 29.18 A moss sporangium with a “spore-shaker” tip

  31. Wind dispersal of lightweight spores has distributed bryophytes around the world. They are common and diverse in moist forests and wetlands. Some even inhabit extreme environments like mountaintops, tundra, and deserts. Mosses can loose most of their body water and then rehydrate and reactivate their cells when moisture again becomes available. 4. Bryophytes provide many ecological and economic benefits

  32. Sphagnum, a wetland moss, is especially abundant and widespread. It forms extensive deposits of undecayed organic material, called peat. Wet regions dominated by Sphagnum or peat moss are known as peat bogs. Its organic materials does not decay readily because of resistant phenolic compounds and acidic secretions that inhibit bacterial activity. Fig. 29.19

  33. Peatlands, extensive high-latitude boreal wetlands occupied by Sphagnum, play an important role as carbon reservoirs, stabilizing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. Sphagnum has been used in the past as diapers and as a natural antiseptic material for wounds. Today, it is harvested for use as a soil conditioner and for packing plants roots because of the water storage capacity of its large, dead cells.

  34. Figure 29.23x7 Life cycle of a fern: archegonia

  35. Figure 29.23x8 Life cycle of a fern: sporophytes

  36. Figure 29.24a Fern sporophyll, a leaf specialized for spore production

  37. Figure 29.24b Fern sporophyll, a leaf specialized for spore production

  38. Figure 29.24c Fern sporophyll, a leaf specialized for spore production

  39. Figure 29.25 Artist’s conception of a Carboniferous forest based on fossil evidence

  40. CHAPTER 29 PLANT DIVERSITY I: HOW PLANTS COLONIZED LAND Section D: The Origin of Vascular Plants 1. Additional terrestrial adaptations evolved as vascular plants descended from mosslike ancestors 2. A diversity of vascular plants evolved over 400 million years ago

  41. Cooksonia, an extinct plant over 400 million years old, is the earliest known vascular plant. Its fossils are found in Europe and North America. The branched sporophytes were up to 50cm tall with small lignified cells, much like the xylem cells of modern pteridophytes. 2. A diversity of vascular plants evolved over 400 million years ago Fig. 29.20

  42. The seedless vascular plants, the pteridophytes consists of two modern phyla: phylum Lycophyta -- lycophytes phylum Pterophyta -- ferns, whisk ferns, and horsetails These phyla probably evolved from different ancestors among the early vascular plants. Diversity (skip) Fig. 29.21

  43. Know this:Modern vascular plants (pteridophytes, gymnosperms, and angiosperms) have food transport tissues (phloem) and water conducting tissues (xylem) with lignified cells; Pteridophytes - ferns - true roots and stem with lignin and leaves (megaphyll/microphyll) In vascular plants the branched sporophyte is dominant and is independent of the parent gametophyte. The first vascular plants, pteridophytes, were seedless.

  44. From the early vascular plants to the modern vascular plants, the sporophyte generation is the larger and more complex plant. For example, the leafy fern plants that you are familiar with are sporophytes. The gametophytes are tiny plants that grow on or just below the soil surface. This reduction in the size of the gametophytes is even more extreme in seed plants. A sporophyte-dominant life cycle evolved in seedless vascular plants

  45. Ferns also demonstrate a key variation among vascular plants: the distinction between homosporous and heterosporous plants. A homosporous sporophyte produces a single type of spore. This spore develops into a bisexual gametophyte with both archegonia (female sex organs) and antheridia (male sex organs).

  46. Figure 29.23 The life cycle of a fern

  47. Figure 29.23x1 Life cycle of a fern: mature fern

  48. Figure 29.23x2 Life cycle of a fern: sorus

  49. Figure 29.23x3 Life cycle of a fern: sporangium