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Training Module: Let’s Move! Child Care Overview. This training module offers an overview of Let’s Move! Child Care for child care and early education providers. The module is intended for use by trainers, and may be adapted for specific needs and audiences.

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Training Module: Let’s Move! Child Care Overview


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    1. Training Module: Let’s Move! Child Care Overview This training module offers an overview of Let’s Move! Child Care for child care and early education providers. The module is intended for use by trainers, and may be adapted for specific needs and audiences. For questions, please email LMCCHelp@cdc.gov.

    2. www.HealthyKidsHealthyFuture.org

    3. What is Let’s Move! Child Care? • One component of the First Lady’s Let’s Move! initiative to solve the obesity problem • Supports providers to adopt best practices for physical activity, screen time, foods, beverages, and breastfeeding through free resources and interactive, online tools • Recognizes providers who meet best practices

    4. Learning Objectives By the end of this training, you will understand: • Basics about childhood obesity prevention and why you have an important role • How participating in Let’s Move! Child Care can help you prevent obesity among children in your care • Where to find free tools and tips to help you meet the Let’s Move! Child Care goals and be recognized for your efforts

    5. Basics about Obesity

    6. Photo source: www.obesityinamerica.org Obesity Common Costly Solvable

    7. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1990 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14%

    8. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2000 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%

    9. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2010 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%

    10. Childhood Obesity • 24% - 33% of 2 – 5 year olds are overweight or obese. • Obesity rates for young children doubled in about a 20 year period of time (1980’s – 2000). • Obese children are more likely to become obese adults. • If children are overweight, obesity in adulthood is likely to be more severe.

    11. What Is Obesity?How Is It Measured? Excess body fat • Indirectly: Excess weight for height • Body mass index (BMI) • Weight (kg)/height(m)2

    12. How do you know if a child is obese? CDC growth charts are used to determine a child’s BMI. For children 2 and older: Obesity = BMI ≥ 95th percentile for children of the same age and sex It can be hard to tell if a child is becoming obese just by looking.

    13. Knowledge Check • Children who are obese are more likely to develop: • Heart disease • Diabetes • Cancer • Sleep Problems • All of the above

    14. Knowledge Check • Children who are obese are more likely to develop: • Heart disease • Diabetes • Cancer • Sleep Problems • All of the above

    15. Health Consequences • Heart disease • Type 2 diabetes • Cancer • Sleep apnea and respiratory problems • Hypertension • High blood cholesterol • Stroke • Osteoarthritis • Gynecological problems • Liver and Gallbladder disease Obesity increases the likelihood of certain diseases and health problems, such as:

    16. Education Consequences Children who are overweight or obese can be undernourished at the same time. • Nutrition deficiencies • Impair brain development and cognitive functioning, including learning

    17. Education Consequences (2) • Physical inactivity • Activity promotes brain development, improves sleep, builds self confidence, and reduces stress & depression • Children who are not active have more behavioral and disciplinary problems, shorter attention spans in class and do worse in school compared to active children • Screen Time • Interferes with exploration, playing, interaction with others, which promote social development • Competes with being active, social interaction, reading, and doing homework

    18. You Play an Important Role in Preventing Obesity!

    19. Moving Forward to Reverse the Obesity Trends “ … we know the cure for this. This isn't like putting a man on the moon or inventing the Internet - it doesn't take some stroke of genius or feat of technology. ... Rarely in the history of this country have we encountered a problem of such magnitude and consequence that is so eminently solvable.” Michelle ObamaFebruary 9, 2010

    20. Video Message from First Lady Michelle Obama [For the video, please email LMCCHelp@cdc.gov.]

    21. Why obesity prevention in child care and early education programs? • Prevention must start early. • Children spend many hours in your care. • You can provide a healthy environment for children to eat, play, and grow.

    22. Why obesity prevention in child care and early education programs? (2) • You can help children build healthy habits for life • Food preferences and physical activity habits develop during early childhood and continue into adulthood • You are a role model. Kids do as you do, especially when they’re young. • You are in a unique position to educate parents about healthy eating and activity

    23. What You Can Do to Prevent Obesity

    24. Preschool Teacher Builds Healthy Habits [To show the video, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/CDCTV/ChildObese/index.html]

    25. 5 Let’s Move! Child Care Goals 1 Physical Activity 2 Screen Time 3 Food 4 Beverages 5 Infant Feeding

    26. 1 Physical Activity

    27. Knowledge Check • What is the recommended amount of physical activity for toddlers in full day care? • 15 - 30 min • 30 - 45 min • 60 - 90 min • 90 - 120 min

    28. Knowledge Check • What is the recommended amount of physical activity for toddlers in full day care? • 15 - 30 min • 30 - 45 min • 60 - 90 min • 90 - 120 min

    29. Physical Activity Best Practices • Infants:Short supervised periods of tummy time several times each day • Toddlers & Preschoolers: Active play time every day, both indoor and outdoor • Toddlers: 60 – 90 minutes or more (for half-day programs, 30 minutes or more) • Preschoolers: 120 minutes or more (for half-day programs, 60 minutes or more) REMINDER: Make sure that kids with special needs can participate in activities too!

    30. Benefits of Physical Activity • Helps children stay at a healthy weight • In childhood • In adulthood – physical activity habits learned in early childhood can last a lifetime • Helps children: • Develop motor skills and build their strength, flexibility, and endurance • Develop and maintain strong bones • Improves social skills and brain development • Sleep better • Feel confident about themselves and their bodies • Reduce their risk of feeling stressed or depressed

    31. Benefits of Physical Activity (2) Children who are active tend to have fewer behavioral and disciplinary problems, do better in school, and have longer attention spans in class.

    32. Ways to Get Kids Moving • Add physical activity into your daily routine • Have children act out a story as you read it to them. • Encourage kids to move like different animals during transitions from one activity or room to another. • Mix up the usual ‘hokey pokey’ and ‘head, shoulders, knees and toes’ with a dance party or obstacle course • Encourage working together to come up with games and activities

    33. Keep infants active too During tummy time: • Encourage them to see, touch, and feel what’s around them • Try putting their favorite toys just out of reach REMINDER: Always make sure infants have tummy time when they’re awake and alert and placed on a solid surface on the floor (never on a surface that’s soft or up high like a mattress or sofa).

    34. 2ScreenTime

    35. Knowledge Check • How much screen time should children under 2 years be allowed? • None • 20 minutes • 30 minutes • 40 minutes

    36. Knowledge Check • How much screen time should children under 2 years be allowed? • None • 20 minutes • 30 minutes • 40 minutes

    37. Screen Time Best Practices • Infants: No screen time • Toddlers: No more than 3 – 4 times per year, or never • Preschoolers: • Only for educational or physical activity purposes • No more than 30 minutes per week or never, while in your care • Work with families to ensure no more than 1 - 2 hours per day • Provide screen time reduction and/or media literacy education to parents at least twice a year, • e.g. special programs, newsletters, or information sheets

    38. Reasons for Reducing Screen Time • Gets in the way of exploring, playing, and social interaction. • As kids get older, screen time can get in the way of being active, reading, doing homework, playing with friends, and spending time with family. • Kids who spend more time watching TV are more likely to be overweight or obese.

    39. Ways to Reduce Screen Time • Keep the TV/computer out of sight • Put it in rooms not used by children • Hide it with a blanket or sheet • Get rid of it • Replace screen time with fun, interactive activities • Turn on the radio or a CD and dance • Play outside • Bring kids into the kitchen and let them help you set the table, cook, and clean up

    40. When screen time is allowed: • Make it “quality programming” by choosing shows or computer games that are educational or get kids moving. • Track screen time with a simple scheduling sheet so you know how much screen time a child has and when they’ve reached their limit for the week.

    41. 3 Food

    42. Knowledge Check • Do French fries, tater tots, or hash browns count as vegetables? • Yes • No

    43. Knowledge Check • Do French fries, tater tots, or hash browns count as vegetables*? • Yes • No *Referring to foods counted as vegetables within LMCC best practices, not current creditable foods for CACFP.

    44. Food Best Practices • Toddlers and preschoolers • Servea fruit and/or a vegetable at every meal (Juice doesn’t count as fruit, and French fries, tater tots, and hash browns don’t count as vegetables!) • Limit fried and pre-fried foods French fries, tater tots, hash browns, potato chips, frozen and breaded meats or fish to no more than once a month • Preschoolers: Serve all meals family style so that children are encouraged to serve themselves with limited help.

    45. Benefits of Healthy Food • Helps children stay at a healthy weight • Opportunity to teach kids’ taste buds to appreciate healthy foods. Food preferences develop at an early age, even in infancy.

    46. Ways to Promote Healthy Eating • Have taste tests for kids to try new veggies and fruits • Serve veggies with yogurt, hummus, or low-fat dressing. • Buy healthy alternatives. Many healthy options cost the same as the not-so-healthy choices (like whole wheat bread vs. white bread)

    47. Ways to Promote Healthy Eating (2) • Offer healthy alternatives in place of fried foods • INSTEAD OF fries TRY potatoes sliced and baked • INSTEAD OF potato chips TRY baked vegetable chips • INSTEAD OF chicken nuggets TRY baked chicken • Be creative and find ways to have healthy holiday and birthday celebrations REMINDER: Hang in there! It may take 10 to 15 tries for young children to accept a new food.

    48. Basics about Family Style Dining • Let children serve themselves with limited help • Talk with children about the foods they’re eating • Adults sit at the table and eat the same foods • Role model healthy eating • Prevent fighting, feeding each other, choking, etc.

    49. Benefits of Family Style Dining • Improves self-feeding skills and recognition of hunger cues • Supports social, emotional, and motor skill development • Children learn about the food they’re eating and are more likely to enjoy and eat healthy food • Language skills improve as adults and children talk with each other • Positive role modeling

    50. Ways to Make Family Style Dining Work • Let kids practice serving themselves first • Use play food, like plastic fruits and veggies. • Use the right equipment • Use child size pitchers, tongs, and serving bowls and plates. • Put dressings and dips in child size squeeze bottles. • Be prepared for spills! • Show kids you enjoy eating healthy foods. They will follow your example!