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How to Fill out the New Autism IEP Supplement. Presented by the Multi Disciplinary Team. Supervisor- Frances Montemayor Toro Team- Darlene Vera Baker Laura Hernandez Rossana Venecia Mustang Team- Sandra C. Rincon Mario Robledo

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How to Fill out the New Autism IEP Supplement


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    1. How to Fill out the New Autism IEP Supplement

    2. Presented by the Multi Disciplinary Team Supervisor- Frances Montemayor Toro Team- Darlene Vera Baker Laura Hernandez Rossana Venecia Mustang Team- Sandra C. Rincon Mario Robledo Tiger Team- Benito Bondoc Barbara Charles Gabbi Ramirez

    3. Objectives The Learner will: • Be able to identify the 11 areas addressed in the supplement • Be able to address the supplement in the ARD appropriately

    4. History of the Autism Supplement • Supplement was created in 1987 addressing seven areas. In 2007, the supplement was revised to add four new areas, totaling 11 that need to be addressed.

    5. Autism Supplement 2007: Implications It does not: • Mandate a specific intervention strategy • Make our jobs easier • Mandate a specific degree or credential

    6. Autism Supplement 2007: Implications It does: • Require discussion and identification of intervention strategies • Raise the bar for programming considerations • Require qualified personnel and training

    7. Autism Supplement: “Strategies” • Each of the 11 items is referred to as a strategy. A strategy is a careful plan or method. • Thus the autism supplement identifies the methods/strategies we should be considering for educational programming • In order to address supplement: Evaluate, Develop/Revise Goals/Objectives, Implement, Assess Progress

    8. 1. Extended Educational Programming • Programming that continues beyond the school day (ESD) or school year (ESY) • Instructional and directly related to current IEP objectives • Determined by ARD committee based on data • Addresses the “educational needs” of the student

    9. Extended Educational Programming Considerations • Extended School Day (ESD) • Services after the regular school day • Extended School Year (ESY) • Summer • Transition times (e.g., holidays)

    10. Extended Educational Programming • Categories to consider for services: • Communication • Social Skills • Behavior • Academics • Self-help Skills • For each relevant category, determine skill level and whether recommended services and time are sufficient for the student to make progress

    11. Extended School Day • Data must support the need for services/strategies that extend beyond the regular school day • Data must be collected on an on-going basis to document the student’s performance on each objective • Analysis of the IEP and Progress is critical to determining the need for extended school day

    12. Extended School Day • Focus of Instruction for ESD • Goals and objectives that are currently addressed in the IEP • IEP must be written in measurable terms with an objective system of data collection for objectives • If not needed, then student is making reasonable progress with the current program in place…

    13. Extended School Day: Example - Strategy Not Needed • An analysis of the IEP goals and objectives reveals that progress is being made on __/__ objectives, thus there is no need for extended school day services at this time. The IEP can be met through the regular school day; the current services and duration of services are sufficient for the student to make progress.

    14. Extended School Day • Consider meeting the needs within the school day with various options, for example: • Differentiated teaching strategies • General education tutoring • Related services • Decreasing student-to-staff ratio • Increasing special education instruction, etc. • Consider duration, intensity, and type of programming • After option(s) implemented, review progress • If there are still difficulties in making progress, extended school day may be considered

    15. Extended School Day: Example - Strategy is Needed • An analysis of the IEP goals and objectives reveals that adequate progress is being made in the following IEP objectives: ________, _______, _______. • There are ___ objectives in _____ which are not showing adequate progress and additional/other within-school-day services have been provided; thus, there is a need for additional instruction beyond the school day in this area. • In order to add ________, extended school day services are recommended for: ______ weeks, _____ minutes per day.

    16. Extended Educational Programming • How to determine need for ESD/ESY: • Progress on objectives • Formal and informal evaluation • Grades, benchmarks • Levels of self-sufficiency • Information from parents • Levels of learning for certain skills (e.g., acquisition versus generalization) • Progress Monitoring

    17. Extended School Year • ESY usually associated with regression-recoupment; not disability specific • ESY: Can be justified without consideration of regression if • Loss of acquired critical skill would be severe • Loss of skill would result in harm to the student or others

    18. Extended School Year • A skill is critical when the loss of that skill results or is expected to result in any of the following during the first 8 weeks of the next school year: • Placement in a more restrictive setting • Loss of acquired skills necessary for progress • Less self-sufficiency/self-help skill areas • Loss of access to community-based independent living skills instruction or environment provided by other sources • Loss of access to on-the-job training, sheltered employment, or competitive employment

    19. Extended School Year: Example - Strategy Not Needed • At this time _____ is making adequate progress in all critical areas. He has not shown any significant regression after school breaks. His family has plans for the summer that support his continued development in the critical areas.

    20. Extended School Year: Example - Strategy is Needed • _____ requires continued instruction in the following critical areas; _____, ______, ______. • Considering ____’s current functioning levels, these areas are likely to result in loss of skills. • Specific objectives from the current IEP to address these areas include: _____, _____, ____.

    21. 2. Daily schedules • Minimal unstructured time means that IEP goals and objectives are being addressed throughout the day and across settings • Student remains meaningfully engaged throughout the majority of the school day • It must begin the minute the student arrives and end the minute he/she leaves • Time increments should be small • Schedule is student specific vs. teacher or classroom specific

    22. Daily SchedulesExample - Strategy is Needed • Based on data collected ______ displays _______ (behavior) and has difficulty with ______ (transition), and _______ (task initiation). • Based on data collected, Johnny displays increased self-stimulatory behaviors in unstructured settings, has difficulty transitioning within the classroom, and does not independently initiate tasks. • A Daily schedule reflecting minimal unstructured time is needed. An example of the schedule is attached.

    23. Daily SchedulesExample - Strategy Not Needed • Based on data collected Johnny does not exhibit behavioral difficulty in unstructured settings. He is able to effectively transition within and between classrooms, and is able to independently initiate tasks or do so with minor prompting from the teacher . • A Daily schedule reflecting minimal unstructured time is not needed. Johnny can follow the regular schedule of the day with natural environmental cues.

    24. 3. In-home training or other viable alternatives Acquisition 1. Facilitating the acquisition of skills/behavior (critical) that can only be acquired if they are taught simultaneously in multiple environments • Adaptive skills (e.g., toilet training) • Reduction of self-injurious behavior (e.g. head-banging) • Communication (e.g., requesting)

    25. 2. Facilitating the acquisition of skills/behavior previously learned in another environment • If a skill/behavior is not exhibited at home but is exhibited at school, then it needs to be acquired at home. • If a skill/behavior is not exhibited at school but is exhibited at home, then it needs to be acquired at school. • If a skill/behavior is not exhibited in the community but is exhibited at school or home, then it needs to be acquired in the community

    26. In-Home and Community-Based Training Example – Parent Declined Strategy • The IHT evaluation supports the need for IHT to address ____. The parent declines the service at this time. • Progress toward objectives _____ indicate the need for IHT/CBT. The parent declines IHT/CBT at this time. Consider: Support is being provided to the parent in terms of parent training.

    27. In-Home and Community-Based Training Example - Strategy Not Needed • IHT/CBT is not needed. Progress on IEP goals and objectives is consistent across settings • Identify the viable alternatives being used • Consider support being provided to the parent in terms of parent training, if needed

    28. Viable Alternatives… • Visuals for home • Schedule for home • Communication notebook • Parent observation at school • Videotapes of teacher working with student • Conferences regarding home concerns • Community-based instruction

    29. 4. Positive Behavior Support Strategies • Should be based on relevant information, for example: antecedent manipulation, replacement behavior, reinforcement strategies, BIP based on the Functional behavior assessment (FBA) • Both BIP and behavioral strategies should reflect goals and objectives that are measurable, clear, specific.

    30. What is Positive Behavior Support (PBS)? • PBS enhance the capacity of schools to educate all students, especially students with challenging behaviors, by adopting a sustained, positive, preventative instructional approach.

    31. What is PBS meant to do? Assess student’s • Needs • strengths and skills • Planning a series of positive interventions that can help the student meet her potential

    32. What procedures are part of PBS? • functional assessment • prevention of problem behavior • differential reinforcement of alternative behaviors that replace the problem behavior. • teaching replacement skills • collaborative teaming

    33. Summary • PBS is an individual-centered approach that looks specifically and broadly at student needs and plans interventions that facilitate life success

    34. 5. Futures planning • May begin at any age, but is required before the age of 16. • Future plans (transitional services) include planning for integrated living, work, community, and educational environments that consider skills necessary to function in current and post secondary environments.

    35. Future planning (Transition Planning) Integrated Living: • Consider what student needs to maximize independence at home. • What kind of living skills will the student need? • How much assistance ,if any, will he/she need in daily activities? Integrated Living: • Consider what student needs to maximize independence at home. • What kind of living skills will the student need? • How much assistance ,if any, will he/she need in daily activities?

    36. Future planning (Transition Planning) Employment: • Is the student able to be employed? • Have you contacted DARS? • Border Region MHMR? • Work on pre-vocational skills in the classroom. • VAC program/ Occupational Preparation classes should be considered during high school. • Career interest surveys/ assessments should be considered.

    37. Future planning (Transition Planning) Community Participation: • What will the student need to access services in the community? • What will the student do for recreation and leisure activities?

    38. Future planning (Transition Planning) Post Secondary Education: • Will the student be going to college or university? • What services will the student need? (an assistant, note takers, tutor etc…) • What type of accommodations will the student at college? • Consider contacting the special populations counselor at the higher education institution?

    39. 6. Parent/Family Training and Support • Training in specific skills • Information about the disorder • Information about resources • Individualized to meet the needs of the family • Based on evaluation • Delivered in appropriate environments • Delivered by personnel with experience in working with students with ASD

    40. The following Parent/Family Training is needed: • Information about support groups • Information about relevant videos • Information about relevant books • Information about relevant web sites • Information about conference/workshops • Parent Training Sessions: • Frequency • Duration • Setting

    41. Parent/Family Training and Support: Example - Strategy is Needed • Parent/Family training and support is needed in the area of _____ based on the evaluation and analysis of the IEP • This will consist of: • Providing information regarding local resources • Demonstrating strategies being used at school which should also be used at home

    42. Parent/Family Training and Support: Example - Strategy Not Needed • Parent/Family training and support is not needed at this time • Parent/Family possesses the necessary skills and knowledge to assist in the student’s educational programming

    43. 7. Suitable staff-to-student ratio Suitable ratios are needed to achieve: • social/behavioral progress based on the child’s developmental and learning level (acquisition, fluency, maintenance, generalization) that encourages work towards individual independence. Ratios are based on: • Adaptive behavior evaluation results • Behavioral accommodation needs across settings • Transitions within the school day • There is NO mention of appropriate staff to student ratio to maintain a safe environment and provide appropriate levels of supervision

    44. Staff-to-Student Ratio • For LISD it is one to two in the self contained classroom (basic guideline) • However, staff to student ratio also needs to be addressed when students are in mainstream classroom • Staff to student ratio also needs to be addressed with the levels of learning (acquisition, fluency, maintenance, and generalization) • It is suggested that ratio should be tied in with the student schedule.

    45. Sample Schedule

    46. Example to state staff-to student ratio when needed • Given ______’s levels of learning, the following ratios are suggested for the implementation of the IEP: ____for IEP objectives at the acquisition level; ____for IEP objectives at the fluency level; ___for IEP objectives at the maintenance level; and ________for IEP objectives at the generalization level. The range of staff to student ratio would be 1:1- 1:___

    47. Staff to student ratio when not needed • Given ___________’s level of learning and adequate progress in the IEP and in the general school setting no specified staff-to-student ratio is required at this time

    48. 8. Communication Interventions • This is the first of four new areas added to the ARD AU supplement by the new Commissioner’s Rule. • It is a provision requiring consideration of “communication interventions”, Including language forms and functions that enhance effective communication across settings (for example: augmentative, incidental, and naturalistic teaching communication) • The rule states that teachers and other instructional staff such as speech therapists are responsible for choosing specific communication methodologies

    49. 8. Communication Interventions • do not just refer to the speech services your district might provide. • many ways to improve communication Picture-based systems Assistive Technology Devices Every child should have some form of communication Inability to communicate can lead to undesired behaviors and isolation.