Effectiveness of Nutrient Phytoremediation via Watercress
Download
1 / 1

Background - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 48 Views
  • Uploaded on

Effectiveness of Nutrient Phytoremediation via Watercress , Basil, Dill, & Lettuce from Flow-Through Aquaculture Effluent West Virginia University, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Derek J. Dyer, Karen M. Buzby, Ph.D., & Roger C. Viadero, Jr., Ph.D. Results & Discussion

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Background' - cree


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Background

Effectiveness of Nutrient Phytoremediation via Watercress, Basil, Dill, & Lettuce from Flow-Through Aquaculture EffluentWest Virginia University, Department of Civil & Environmental EngineeringDerek J. Dyer, Karen M. Buzby, Ph.D., & Roger C. Viadero, Jr., Ph.D.

Results & Discussion

  • The low water velocity low plant density (LVLD) watercress treatment was most effective at the removal of nitrate (8.8%) and ammonia (7.1%).

  • The low water velocity high plant density (LVHD) watercress treatment was most effective at the removal of 4.9% of the phosphate.

  • The lettuce treatment was most effective at the removal of 11.2% of the ammonia.

  • The high water velocity high plant density (HVHD) treatment combination allowed for the greatest plant growth.

  • Environmental conditions in the aquaculture hanger and the summer and fall were most beneficial to nitrate removal via watercress.

  • Environmental conditions in the greenhouse and the winter and spring were most beneficial to ammonia and phosphate removal via watercress.

  • Temperature and light intensity variations were identified as factors affecting the uptake of different nutrients via the watercress and other plant species.

Background

  • Preliminary studies were conducted between June 2005 and June 2006 to determine if watercress (Nasturtium officinale), basil (Ocimum basilicum), dill (Anethum graveolens), and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) could be used to reduce nutrients from aquaculture effluent in sufficient concentrations to be considered an effective remediation technique.

  • A research site was established adjacent to an aquaculture facility located at the WVU Reymann Memorial Farm in Wardensville, WV.

Investigative Approach

  • Construction of a novel plywood reinforced aquatic phytoremediation and plant cultivation channel and greenhouse system was completed between June and December 2005.

  • Water velocity, plant density and plant species were varied to establish operational conditions. Each treatment was conducted in triplicate.

  • Water samples were measured at 3 week intervals for the nutrients: NH3, NO3-, NO2-, and PO43-.

  • Temperature and light intensity were monitored constantly throughout the studies.