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  1. DO NOW: • Please take a British Isles map. Complete it by labeling and color coding the following: • Ireland • United Kingdom • English Channel • Irish Sea • North Sea • Thames River • England • Great Britain • Northern Ireland • Wales • Scotland • Dublin • London

  2. High and Late Middle Ages 1050-1450 Miss Bonner

  3. 3, 2, 1, 2, 3 top of page 57 • 3 Parts of Great Britain • 2 British Isle Countries • 1 Definition of what the United Kingdom is. • 2 Capitol Cities • 3 Important bodies of water

  4. Evolution of British and Government: bottom of page 57 • Make a timeline at the bottom of your page using the information below. • 1066- Norman conquest • 1086- Domesday Book • 1160’s-1180’s- Common Law • 1215- Magna Carta • 1295- Model Parliament

  5. The Rest of pg. 58 • WHO ARE YOU? • British and French Monarchs of the High and Late Middle Ages

  6. How to set up page 58 • Holding your notebook landscape style, above the red line write down the names of the following monarchs. • King John • Henry II • William the Conqueror • Edward I • Hugh Capet • Phillip II • Louis IX • Phillip IV

  7. More for Page 58 • On the lined part of the page, Make the chart that you will fill out matching the correct royal with the actions that he took during his rule. • Please make sure that you leave enough space under the notable action column. • Please see next slide….

  8. Top of pg. 59 • With rulers fighting for more power, explosive conflicts erupted between monarchs and the Church • After the death of Charlemagne, the Holy Roman Empire dissolved into a number of separate states • German emperors claimed authority over much of Europe, France, and Italy • It was called the Holy Roman Empire because: • They were crowned by the pope • “Roman” because they saw themselves as heirs to the emperors of ancient Rome.

  9. Bottom of Pg. 59 Working with a partner, Use the following pages 251-254 to complete Your guided notes sheet . Then using that information, complete the Lay investiture chronology. • Paste the guided notes half sheet:

  10. Chronology for Lay Investiture: Bottom of pg 59 Using the textbook and what you have learned today in class, do your best to put the following chronology in order: ____The struggle for investiture lasted for almost 50 years. ____In 1122, both sides accepted a treaty called the Concordat of Worms- stated that only the Church could appoint bishops. ____Popes, like Gregory VII, tried to end lay investiture, which they saw as outside interference from secular rulers ____The Holy Roman emperors and other monarchs often appointed Church officials for their land, lay investiture

  11. Pair Share From where did we get our ideas to create the American political system of democracy we have today? Which important documents have had the most influence on our government?

  12. Important English Documents The way our government works today can be traced to important documents in history:

  13. DEMOCRACY

  14. A contract between the nobles and King John to limit the monarch’s power and guarantee Certain individual rights The Magna Carta1215

  15. The Magna Carta King John

  16. Film Clip: The Magna Carta

  17. Gathering of knights, nobles, and leading citizens to vote on taxes and laws. Representatives of the people. Creation of the Model Parliament1295

  18. House of Parliament

  19. Law prevents rulers from imprisoning people without reason. (Law still applies in the U.S. today) Habeas Corpus1679

  20. Creation of a Constitutional Monarchy 1689 Government where Parliament and a written constitution limit what the monarch can do. (Ends absolute rule & divine right)

  21. Film Clip: The Glorious Revolution of England

  22. English Bill of Rights1689 Stated the rights of people and the limits of the government (freedom of speech, collecting taxes, use military)

  23. Ideas of the rights of the individual and the limits that should be placed on government helped to encourage the American and French Revolutions.

  24. Activity: Important Documents That Influenced Democracy Directions: Pairs - Read aloud the information about the Magna Carta, Petition of Right and the English Bill of Rights and complete the corresponding worksheet.

  25. The Magna Carta 1215 A group of determined Barons forced King John to sign the Magna Carta. Weary of King John’s military campaigns and heavy taxes, the barons were seeking protection against arbitrary acts by King John. The Magna Carta included such fundamental rights as trial by jury and due process of law – protection against the wrongful taking of life, liberty, or property. This protection was originally meant for only the privileged classes, but overtime, all English people were protected. The Magna Carta also determined that the power of the monarch was not absolute.

  26. Documents Influencing Early Government Magna Carta: 1215 Barons vs. King John Petition of Right: 1628 Parliament and Charles I English Bill of Rights: 1688 Parliament and Will/Mary of Orange • Trial by jury • Due process of law • Later, All people, not just privileged protected • Power of monarch not absolute (limited by the Constitution and it’s Articles) • Trial by jury for political critics • Can’t rule by force • No quartering of soldiers • Monarchs must obey law of land (Constitution) • Fair Speedy Trial • Parliament approves changes to laws • Freedom from excessive bail • No cruel and unusual punishment • Free elections

  27. Petition of Right:1628 The Magna Carta was respected by some monarchs and ignored by others for 400 years. During this time, England’s Parliament, a representative body with power to make laws, slowly grew in influence. In 1628, when Charles I asked Parliament for more money in taxes, Parliament refused until he signed the Petition of Right. The Petition of Right limited the king’s power by demanding that the king not imprison political critics without trial by jury; not declare martial law, or rule by the military, during peacetime; nor require people to shelter troops without the homeowner’s consent. The petition challenged the divine right of kings, declaring that they also follow law of the land.

  28. Documents Influencing Early Government Magna Carta: 1215 Barons vs. King John Petition of Right: 1628 Parliament and Charles I English Bill of Rights: 1688 Parliament and Will/Mary of Orange • Trial by jury • Due process of law • Later, All people, not just privileged protected • Power of monarch not absolute (limited by the Constitution and it’s Articles) • Trial by jury for political critics • Can’t rule by force • No quartering of soldiers • Monarchs must obey law of land (Constitution) • Fair Speedy Trial • Parliament approves changes to laws • Freedom from excessive bail • No cruel and unusual punishment • Free elections

  29. The English Bill of Rights: 1688 In 1688, after years of revolt and turmoil, Parliament offered the crown to William and Mary of Orange during the Glorious Rebellion. To prevent William and Mary misusing their powers, Parliament, in 1689, drew up a Bill of Rights they had to agree to. The English Bill of Rights prohibited a standing army in peacetime (except with Parliaments permission) and required that all elections be free. It also declared that laws could not be changed without consent of the parliament. Also included the right to a fair and speedy trial, freedom from excessive bail, and protection from cruel and unusual punishment.

  30. Documents Influencing Early Government Magna Carta: 1215 Barons vs. King John Petition of Right: 1628 Parliament and Charles I English Bill of Rights: 1688 Parliament and Will/Mary of Orange • Trial by jury • Due process of law • Later, All people, not just privileged protected • Power of monarch not absolute (limited by the Constitution and it’s Articles) • Trial by jury for political critics • Can’t rule by force • No quartering of soldiers • Monarchs must obey law of land (Constitution) • Fair Speedy Trial • Parliament approves changes to laws • Freedom from excessive bail • No cruel and unusual punishment • Free elections

  31. Wrap-Up What are the similarities of these documents? What are the differences? What is similar between these documents and the American Constitution?

  32. What else was going on in the world at 1050?All of pg. 63 ISLAMIC EMPIRE INDIA CHINA Islamic civilization spread from Spain to India. Islamic traders went as far as West Africa. Cities thrived, despite political division. Hinduism and Buddhism flourished. Culture flourished under Tang and Song dynasties. Chinese made advances in technology. WEST AFRICA AMERICAS BYZANTINE EMPIRE The Sonike people built the great trading empire of Ghana. Merchants traded gold all over the world. Mayas cleared rain forests to build cities. Native Americans in Peru built empires. Scholars studied Greek and Roman writings. Merchants mingled with traders from the Italian states.

  33. Pg. 61 Crusades Guided Notes Sheet. • We will also watch a clip from Mankind: The Story of All of Us. It will reinforce the information from the guided notes.

  34. A little Background: • A Little Background… • The outside world in 1050- While Europe was stuck in the Dark Ages, the rest of the world was booming with cultural, political and Economic Advancements. • + Including • Islamic World, India, China, W. Africa, American Civilizations, and the Byzantines.

  35. A Little Background Cont. • Remember feudalism was a result of the need for_____________. Now that the need for knights and warrior culture has___________declined feudalism is breaking down. What is a bored young knight supposed to do? Find a new cause _____________________.

  36. Launching the Crusades • Crusades are a ___________________________ • Their goal was ____________________________________________________ • 1071 Turks take Jerusalem and part of the Byzantine Empire in the _____________________ • It was there that Pope Urban II asked for___________________ • Rallying cry_________________

  37. Fighting the Crusades: • Fighting the Crusades • 1096 First Crusade • Group A: • Group B:

  38. Fighting the Crusades: • 1144 Second Crusade- • * • 1175 _________________ (Muslim leader) drove all of the Christians out of Jerusalem. • A draw was declared by ___________________________________ who rode back to England. • 1201-1291 • **

  39. Effects of Crusades on Feudal Europe • Effects of the Crusades on Feudal Europe • *Economic • *Political • *Social

  40. Crusades- Historical Heads • Assignment- using the templates and the information provided, create a historical head for a crusader knight and a Muslim most likely a Selijuk Turk living in Jerusalem at that time. • What would each be thinking regarding the crusades, the ownership of the “Holy Land” and of each other? • See instructions for exact directions • At the end of the activity on the back of the sheet have an explanation for each of the items/images used and what there meanings are.

  41. Crusades Chronology: • ___Saladin drove the Christians out of the Holy Land. • ___Pope Urban II sent the Christians to fight Muslims at the Council of Claremont. • ___Feudal Society begins to break down. Knights are bored. • ___Christian Knights Capture the holy land and divided it into 4 sections.

  42. Wars, Conflict, and Candy? • When you bite/break a YORK Peppermint Patty, what COLOR do you see?

  43. What Caused War and Conflict in the Middle Ages? • EQ: What caused war and conflict in the late Middle Ages: Religious Crises: • Rise in Heresy: • Inquisitions: • **

  44. Wars, Conflict, and Candy? • Wars and Conflict: • 100 Years War: • *Joan of Arc- • War of the Roses: • * • * • * • War ended when ___________________ took over the thrown • Why did it lead to peace?

  45. Learning and Culture Flourish Section 8-4 pp. 262-268

  46. Preview Questions • How did medieval universities advance learning? • How did “new” learning affect medieval thought? • What styles of art, literature, and architecture developed in the High Middle Ages?