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The Language Structure Knowledge and Knowledge Calibration of Speech-Language Pathology Students in Eight SEUCE Programs. 2008 SEUCE Conference Asheville, NC September 18-19, 2008. Sandie Barrie Blackley, MA/CCC & Vicki McCready, MA/CC

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slide1

The Language Structure Knowledge and Knowledge Calibration of Speech-Language Pathology Students in Eight SEUCE Programs

2008 SEUCE ConferenceAsheville, NC September 18-19, 2008

Sandie Barrie Blackley, MA/CCC & Vicki McCready, MA/CC

andPeggy Agee, Brenda Beverly, Dawn Botts, Mary Dale Fitzgerald,

Sally Ann Giess, Arianne Pait & Elissa Zylla-Jones

Thanks to Bill Dudley, Ph.D. and Jamila Minga, MS/CCC-SLPwho worked on the statistical analysis

slide2

Language StructureFundamentalsHow completely and successfully are we teaching our SLP graduate students these fundamentals…and How much do licensed SLPs know…?

language structure parameters
Language Structure Parameters
  • Spoken Language parameters (ASHA, 1983):
  • phonology
  • morphology
  • semantics
  • syntax
  • pragmatics
  • Written Language parameters add:
  • phonics
  • orthography

Are these included in your curriculum?

language structure
Language Structure

Print is a visual representation of language form and structure:

  • phonology- the sequence of speech sound
  • orthography- spelling patterns
      • Explicit phonics
      • Implicit phonics
  • morphology- units of meaning in words
  • syntax- sentence structure
a little history
A little history…..

During Orientation Week in 2005 SBB & VMc gave incoming UNCG graduate students an adapted version of a word structure survey developed by Cunningham et al. (2004) for K-3 teachers.

That pilot survey was focused at the word-level:

I. Phonological Knowledge

II. Explicit Phonics Knowledge

III. Implicit Phonics Knowledge

seuce involvement
SEUCE Involvement
  • In the fall of 2006 SBB & VMc presented these pilot findings to SEUCE.
  • SEUCE members were interested in assessing the language structure knowledge of their SLP students and wanted to expand the survey to include morphology and syntax.
survey expanded
Survey Expanded
  • With the help of SEUCE members, items addressing morphology and syntax were added to the survey.
  • A multi-site IRB was approved by UNCG in 2005. A modification was approved in 2007.The IRB was recently renewed until August 2009
the following programs are included on the uncg irb
The following programs are included on the UNCG IRB:
  • Appalachian State U.
  • Arkansas State U.
  • Auburn U.
  • Longwood U.
  • Tennessee State U.
  • U. of Central Florida
  • U. of North Carolina at Greensboro
  • Southern Alabama U.
  • Western Carolina U.
the following seuce programs submitted data for this multi site pilot listed alphabetically
The following SEUCE programs submitted data for this (multi-site) pilot(listed alphabetically)
  • Appalachian State University-group #1 (N = 28)
  • Auburn University (N = 18)
  • Arkansas State University (N = 20)
  • Longwood University (N= 11)
  • Tennessee State University (N = 21)
  • University of Central Florida-group #1 (N = 29)
  • University of Central Florida-group # 2(N = 13)
  • University of NC–Greensboro (N = 29)
  • University of. South Alabama (N = 20)

TOTAL Ss= 204 graduate students

for comparison a group of 36 school based slps
For comparison: a group of 36 School-based SLPs

The survey was used as an assessment on July 26, 2007 to begin a two day NC Department of Public Instruction continuing education event (A Language-Literacy Tune-Up for SLPs) taught by Barrie-Blackley & McCready and other UNCG Clinical Educators.

the ten groups universities listed alphabetically
The Ten Groups (universities listed alphabetically)

Appalachian State University-group #1 (N = 28)

Auburn University (N = 18)

Arkansas State University (N = 20)

Longwood University (N= 11)

Tennessee State University (N = 21)

University of Central Florida-group #1 (N = 29)

University of Central Florida-group # 2(N = 13)

University of NC–Greensboro (N = 29)

University of. South Alabama (N = 20)

SLPs licensed in NC (N= 36)

TOTAL Ss = 240

the survey
The Survey
  • The word-level knowledge items adapted from theCunningham et al. (2004) survey are identified by
  • New items added to assess morphology and syntax knowledge ( identified by )
overview format universities unidentified order licensed slps group 8
Overview FormatUniversities:unidentifiedorder Licensed SLPS: Group 8

mean

Ss response accuracy

  • sites (programs) 

… only you know your program’s number (s)

part a knowledge calibration
Part A: Knowledge Calibration

Before taking the survey Ss were asked

to gauge their knowledge & skill level in

five areas of language structure:

A) no experience (0)

B) minimal skills (1)

C) proficient (2)

D) expert (3)

language structure domains
Language Structure Domains
  • 1. Phonological Awareness (sound counting)
  • 2. Explicit Phonics (orthographic concepts)
  • 3. Implicit Phonics (ID phonologically irregular words)
  • 4. Morphology
    • morpheme counting
    • free & bound morphs.
    • inflectional & derivational morphs.
    • grammatical morphs.
  • 5. Syntax
    • sentence types
    • parts of speech
knowledge calibration 5 questions x 3 15 max score
Knowledge Calibration (5 questions x 3 = 15 max. score)

(Between groups difference is significant < .01)

7.2

 sites (programs) 

1 phonological awareness indicate the number of phonemes in the following words
1. Phonological Awareness:Indicate the number of phonemes in the following words:
  • sun
  • laughed
  • grass
  • Christmas
  • though
  • psychology
  • scratch
  • each
  • say
  • chalk
  • exit

s-u-n (3)

l-au-gh-ed (4)

g-r-a-ss (4)

Ch-r-i-st-m-a-s (7)

th-ough (2)

ps-y-ch-o-l-o-g-y (8)

s-c-r-a-tch (5)

ea-ch (2)

s-ay (2)

ch-al-k (3) *

e-x-i-t (5)

k s

The reliability of this

scale is .85

1 phonological awareness
1. Phonological Awareness:

(Between groups difference significant <.001)

Accuracy in counting the number of phonemes in 11 words

7.6

 sites (programs) 

slide20
2. Explicit Phonics Knowledge PHONICS= How >40 English speech sounds are represented by just 24 letters of the alphabet

Phonics knowledge was tested through nine multiple choice questions requiring precise definition of terms:

syllable syllable type

diphthong digraph

schwa consonant blend

2 explicit phonics knowledge 1
2. Explicit Phonics Knowledge-1

A syllable is a unit that:

  • contains at least one consonant
  • contains one and only one vowel sound
  • contains a combination of vowels and consonants
  • is the smallest meaningful unit of language

40%

 Percent correct average for all sites

2 explicit phonics knowledge 2
2. Explicit Phonics Knowledge-2

Consonant speech sounds in American-English are represented:

  • by 18 of the consonant letters of the alphabet plus certain digraphs
  • by single letter consonants plus their two- and three-letter blends
  • by consonant-vowel combinations
  • American English language is too irregular to represent the consonant speech sounds with any degree of accuracy.

57%

 Percent correct average for all sites

2 explicit phonics knowledge 3
2.Explicit Phonics Knowledge-3

The open syllable of the nonsense word botem would most likely rhyme with:

  • cot
  • hot
  • ran
  • low
  • gem

56%

 Percent correct average for all sites

2 explicit phonics knowledge 4
2. Explicit Phonics Knowledge-4

A diphthong is best illustrated by the vowels representing the sound of:

  • owin snow
  • ouin mouse
  • oo in foot
  • ai in said
  • a and b

49%

 Percent correct average for all sites

2 explicit phonics knowledge 5
2. Explicit Phonics Knowledge-5

The sound of the schwa is represented by the:

  • a in baited
  • e in early
  • e in happen
  • w in show
  • all of the above

68%

 Percent correct average for all sites

2 explicit phonics knowledge 6
2. Explicit Phonics Knowledge-6

An example of a ‘closed syllable’ is:

  • desk
  • home
  • tight
  • all of these
  • none of these

10%

 Percent correct average for all sites

2 explicit phonics knowledge 7
2. Explicit Phonics Knowledge-7

If e were the only vowel in an open syllable, the e would most likely represent the same sound as the:

  • e in pine
  • ea in meat
  • y in my
  • e in set
  • none of these

41%

 Percent correct average for all sites

2 explicit phonics knowledge 8
2. Explicit Phonics Knowledge-8

An example of a consonant blend is the:

  • ch in chip
  • sl in slip
  • th in bath
  • rl in girl
  • a and c

34%

 Percent correct average for all sites

2 explicit phonics knowledge 9
2. Explicit Phonics Knowledge-9

An example of a digraph is the:

  • ch in cheese
  • st in steel
  • th in thin
  • mb in thumb
  • a and c

67%

 Percent correct average for all sites

3 implicit phonics knowledge
3. Implicit Phonics Knowledge

In this list of (26) words circle the words that contain irregular American-English spelling patterns:

done, make, but, skill, on, said, rebate, chunk, the, sir, have, tax, was, five, give, kick, velvet, what, one, does, still, backed, pint, mash, yacht, word

See next slide……

3 implicit phonics between groups difference significant at 001
3. Implicit Phonics(Between groups difference- significant at <.001)

Mean number of correctly identified

irregularly spelled words out of 11 targets

4.6

 sites (programs) 

4 morphology
 4. Morphology

A. Indicate the number of grammatical morphemes in each of the following:

  • dog (1)
  • is jumping (3)
  • ran (1)
  • does*(1)
  • clapped (2)
  • Sara’s balls (4)

The reliability of this

scale is .85

See next slide………..

4 morphology1
 4. Morphology

B. In which of the following does a “third person singular” grammatical morpheme occur?

  • does
  • jump
  • eats
  • ran

51% (range: 5.3% 17%)

 Percent correct average for all sites

4 morphology2
 4. Morphology

C. Indicate if each example is a free (f) or a bound (b) morpheme:

4 morphology3
 4. Morphology

C. Indicate if each underlined example is an inflectional (I) or a derivational (D) morpheme:

slide37
 4. MorphologyD. From the following sentence give one example of the following grammatical morphemes (1-4):

The girl who jumped on the trampoline fell when she dropped her brother’s ball.

  • a regular past tense verb: jumped or dropped
  • an irregular past tense verb: fell
  • an article: the
  • a possessive form of a noun: brother’s
4 morphology between groups difference is not significant at 05
4. Morphology (Between groups difference is notsignificant at .05)

Mean correct for Items IV. A.-D

21

 sites (programs) 

5 syntax e in the sentence it s not true the word it s is
 5. SyntaxE. In the sentence, It’s not true, the word ‘It’s’ is:
  • a possessive pronoun
  • a possessive noun
  • a pronoun + copula
  • a pronoun + auxiliary

51%

 Percent correct average for all sites

5 syntax f indicate if following sentences are simple s compound c or complex cx
 5. Syntax F. Indicate if following sentences aresimple (S), compound (C), or complex (CX):
  • Mary was admitted to graduate school but she might not go.__C___
  • The author, John Lane, autographed his books at Barnes and Noble on the third Saturday in March, 2006. ___S__
  • When Sara announced her engagement, her parents cried. __CX__
  • The bike that was in the accident was blue.__CX___

Average accuracy on this four item task was 43% across all sites, ranging from 15% accuracy for item 2 to 100% on item 1.

5 syntax g circle all the adverbs in the following sentence how many adverbs are there
 5. Syntax G. Circle all the adverbs in the following sentence. How many adverbs are there?

That ferocious dog ran veryfast down the dusty road to chase the elderly mail carrier who was only doing his job.

Average percent accuracy across all sites was 27% (range 15.4% - 41%).

5 syntax h circle all the nouns in the following sentences and indicate the number of nouns in each
 5. Syntax H. Circle all the nouns in the following sentences and indicate the number of nouns in each.
  • It’s a cloudy day. __1___
  • Flowers of all kinds dotted the distant landscape. ___3__
  • Mandy counted five fish. __2___
  • Come here right now Gandalf, you naughty dog! __2___

69%

27%

92%

73%

 Percent correct average for all sites

slide43
 5. Syntax I. Circle all the pronouns in the following sentences andindicate the number of pronouns in each.
  • I don’t think it’s important that you give something to everyonewho comes. __6___
  • Who was thatwho did not pay her fine? __4___
  • If he does whateverhe wants he won’t please himself or you.___6__

4. Which is best, yours or mine?___3__

5.4%

5.9%

7.4%

12.3%

 Percent correct average for all sites

5 syntax items e i between group difference is not significant at 05
5. Syntax (Items E.-I.)(Between Group difference is notsignificant at .05)

Mean correct out of 14 possible

5.3

 sites (programs) 

slide45

KNOWLEDGE CALIBRATIONIn general, Ss’ self-ratings are not associated with their level of their knowledge. There was a weak association only for the Explicit Phonics items (at <.05).

7.2

Groups

differ:

<.01

 sites (programs) 

language structure parameters1
Language Structure Parameters
  • Spoken Language parameters (ASHA, 1983):
  • phonology
  • morphology
  • semantics
  • syntax
  • pragmatics

What are the curricular implications of this data?

  • Written Language parameters add:
  • phonics
  • orthography
slide47

Poster Session ASHA ~ ChicagoEnglish Language Structure: What Do Our Graduate Students Know?

Sandie Barrie Blackley, MA/CCC, & Vicki McCready, MA/CCC

and

Peggy Agee, Brenda Beverly, Dawn Botts,

Mary Dale Fitzgerald, Sally Ann Giess,

Arianne Pait & Elissa Zylla-Jones

Poster Board 316 Session #1966

Friday 11/21/08 8- 9:30 AM

where do we go from here
Where do we go from here??
  • Develop a skills and knowledge assessment instrument?
  • Make money for SEUCE?

Meet in Hawaii………..!

  • How to fund it?
slide49

Thanks!!

Sandie: sbblackl@uncg.edu

Vicki: cvmccrea@uncg.edu

references
References

Blackley, S. B. & McCready, V. Word Structure Knowledge and Knowledge Calibration of First Year Graduate Students in Speech-Language Pathology. A presentation to the Annual Conference of the International Dyslexia Association. Denver, CO, November 10, 2005

Blackley, S. B. & McCready, V. Word Structure Knowledge and Knowledge Calibration of First Year Graduate Students in Speech-Language Pathology. A Poster Session presented at the Annual Convention of the American Speech, Language, Hearing Association. Miami, FL, November 17, 2006.

Cunningham, A.E., Perry, K.E., Stanovich, K.E., & Stanovich, P.J. (2004). Disciplinary knowledge of K-3 teachers and their knowledge calibration in the domain of early language. Annals of Dyslexia, 54 (1), 139-167.

references continued
References-continued

Moats, L. C. (2000). Speech to print: Languageessentials for teachers. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Co.

Moats, L. C. and Foorman, B. F. (2003). Measuring teachers’ content knowledge of language and reading. Annals of Dyslexia, 53, 23-45.

National Reading Panel (2000). Teaching children to read: An evidence-based assessment of the scientific research on reading and its implications for reading instruction. Bethesda, MD: The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, The National Institutes of Health.

part a knowledge calibration1
Part A: Knowledge Calibration
  • Word Structure Knowledge (Part A) (Please circle only one answer per question)

I. How would you describe your current knowledge or skill level in providing clients with structured practice in phonemic awareness?

A) no experience B) minimal skills C) proficient D) expert

II. How would you describe your current level or skill level instructing clients to relate sounds to letters and spelling?

A) no experience B) minimal skills C) proficient D) expert

III. How would you describe your current knowledge or skill level in providing clients with explicit phonics instruction?

A) no experience B) minimal skills C) proficient D) expert

part a continued
Part A- continued

IV. How would you describe your current knowledge or skill level in helping clients expand the morphological complexity of their language?

A) no experience B) minimal skills C) proficient D) expert

V. How would you describe your current knowledge or skill level in helping clients improve the grammatical clarity of their language?

A) no experience B) minimal skills C) proficient D) expert