journal 2 02 24 2010 solve a world problem n.
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Journal #2: 02/24/2010 Solve a World Problem

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  1. Journal #2: 02/24/2010Solve a World Problem • Make a short list of 3-5 problems that exist in the world today (like hunger, jobs, etc. ) • Choose one, and explain how you would solve this problem if given the opportunity. • Then, tell me (this can be funny if you like) What would be the ABSOLUTE WORST WAY to solve this problem? Explain why.

  2. Neoclassical Drama/ Theatre By Vanessa Molden Western High School

  3. Neoclassical Theatre • Started in France in the mid 1600’s (during the Baroque period in music and visual art) • Modeled on classical Greek and ancient Roman examples. • Based on the principles of Aristotle. • Guidelines were established for the arts. Theatre had to follow RULES.

  4. RULE #1: Purity of Dramatic Form • Complete separation of COMEDY and TRAGEDY according to classical tradition. • TRAGEDY • Written in high poetic style • Feature kings and aristocrats • Deal with affairs of state and the downfall of rulers • End unhappily • COMEDY • Written in more ordinary speech (though still in verse) • Feature ordinary characters from middle and working classes • Deal with domestic and personal affairs • End happily

  5. RULE #2: Verisimilitude • Plays should only include events that could happen in real life. • This excludes: • Supernatural Beings • Fantasy Elements • Onstage Violence (because it was rarely convincing and potentially offensive) • Choruses • Soliloquies (a monologue where a character speaks directly to the audience, or to themselves)

  6. RULE #3: Serious Moral Purpose • Plays were meant to teach a lesson • The virtuous are rewarded, while the wicked are punished • In Moliere’s comedies, the moral usually concerns maintaining a balanced view of life.

  7. RULE #4: Universal Truths • Playwrights are expected to focus not on the details of individual characters, but on the universal and permanent aspects of humanity

  8. Rule #5: Decorum • Characters must act in a way that is appropriate to their stations in life.

  9. Rule #6: The Three Unities • Three Unities: Time, Space, and Action • A well-crafted play should take place within a very short time period (no more than 24 hours) • Should take place within a very confined area. • Should concern only one main action (no or few subplots)

  10. Rule #7: Five-Act Structure Act Three: Climax Act Two: Rising Action Act Four: Falling Action Act Five: Denouement Act One: Exposition

  11. Moliere (1622-1673) • Born Jean-Baptiste Poquelin • France’s greatest comic playwright – Louis XIV loved his work. • Master of SATIRE • Folly, vices, and pretensions of characters are exposed through witty dialogue, clever language, and physical gags • Wrote: The Misanthrope (1666), The Doctor In Spite of Himself (1666), and Tartuffe (1664)

  12. Reading Satire • Jonathan Swift was an author who was writing during the Neoclassical Period. • Like Moliere, much of Swift’s work is considered SATIRE. • He wrote Gulliver’s Travels (a novel) and the short essay, “A Modest Proposal” among other things. • Read “A Modest Proposal” and answer the questions that follow. This will be turned in for a grade. ***Whatever you do not finish should be completed for homework and turned in tomorrow