slide1 l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Bilingual Deaf Education: The Impact of Teachers’ Beliefs on Professional Development and Classroom Practices PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Bilingual Deaf Education: The Impact of Teachers’ Beliefs on Professional Development and Classroom Practices

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 26

Bilingual Deaf Education: The Impact of Teachers’ Beliefs on Professional Development and Classroom Practices - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 288 Views
  • Uploaded on

Bilingual Deaf Education: The Impact of Teachers’ Beliefs on Professional Development and Classroom Practices. Maribel G árate, Ph.D. CASA Conference April 2008. Who is here?. Parents Teachers PIP/ECE Elementary Middle School and High school Specialists and Support staff

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Bilingual Deaf Education: The Impact of Teachers’ Beliefs on Professional Development and Classroom Practices' - bernad


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Bilingual Deaf Education: The Impact of Teachers’ Beliefs on Professional Development and Classroom Practices

Maribel Gárate, Ph.D.

CASA Conference

April 2008

who is here
Who is here?
  • Parents
  • Teachers
    • PIP/ECE
    • Elementary
    • Middle School and High school
  • Specialists and Support staff
    • ASL / Bilingual Specialists
    • Speech and language professionals
    • Reading/literacy specialists
  • Administrators
  • Anyone else I forgot
slide3

Lead mentor and trainer

for the ASL/English

Bilingual Professional

Development model.

Gallaudet University Department of Education

Assistant Professor

UG & MA

English as a Second Language

teacher at Kendall Demonstration

Elementary School.

Itinerant teacher of deaf and

hard of hearing Mainstreamed

students with the Arlington

Public School system.

overview
Overview
  • Background
    • What we know
  • The study
    • What I wanted to know
  • The Process: methodology
    • Who, Where, & How,
  • The Findings
    • Beliefs and Classroom practice
  • Implications:
    • So what?
background
Background
  • Growing support for a bilingual approach to educating Deaf children first proposed in the 1970’s,
  • On-going criticism about inconsistent implementation among programs self-identified as bilingual,
  • Creation of a professional development model in Deaf education promoting changes within the teaching profession by educating teachers about theories in general bilingual education: American Sign Language (ASL)/English Bilingual Professional Development (AEBPD) (1997),
  • Currently, little documentation about AEBPD’s impact on teachers’ application of bilingual practices.
we know that

Personal experience

Schooling experience

Formal knowledge

Teachers’ Beliefs

Teaching

Learners & learning

Subjectmatter

Teachingrole

Instruction

We know that …
slide7
Bilingual Education:
  • Bilingual teachers believe in the role of the students’ first language and culture and the need for language role models. Their beliefs are influenced by their own status as bilinguals and their professional training.

Second Language Teaching

  • Teachers’ beliefs about language teaching are influenced by their training, and both formal and informal experiences as language learners.

(Martinez, 2000; Gonzales, 2000; Flores, 2001)

(Johnson, 1992, 1994; Eisentein-Ebsworth & Schweers, 1997; Maum, 2003)

slide8
Deaf Education:
  • Deaf education teachers hold beliefs about their students and their role in promoting literacy development.
  • Deaf bilingual education teachers hold beliefs about the role of American Sign Language, English, and Deaf culture in bilingual classrooms for Deaf students.

(Erting, 1985; Reed, 2003)

(Bailes, 1999; Gallimore, 2000)

let us test these ideas

Let us test these ideas

Take the survey

Turn to someone near you and compare your answers

If your answers differ for any one question, explain your reasons for answering the way you did

we also know

Professional

Development

We also know …

Address beliefs

Make beliefs explicit

Sustained

Ongoing

Intensive

Collaboration

Inquiry

Reflection

Action research

Modeling

Mentoring

slide11
Professional Development
  • Professional development efforts must address teachers’ beliefs in order to affect change in their teaching practices.
  • Teachers must be presented with alternative practice models and demonstrations.

(Guskey, 1986; Freeman, 1991,Richardson, 1994; Brody, 1998)

the study
The Study
  • To document and describe the implementation of the ASL/English Bilingual Professional Development Model in one school,
  • To investigate the changes in stated beliefs and instructional practices of three teachers who participated in the training, and
  • To explore the relationship between their beliefs and practice.
research questions
Research Questions

1. How was the model implemented at this school during the two-year period?

2. What changes, if any, occurred in the participants’ stated beliefs about:

  • language learning,
  • language teaching, and
  • language acquisition?

3. What changes, if any, occurred in the participants’ instructional practices?

4. What connection, if any, exists between the participants’ stated beliefs and their instructional practices?

slide15
Data sources:
    • Interviews, guided reflections, classroom observations, mentor meetings, selected seminar, seminar summaries
  • Constant Comparative Method : ATLASti
  • Triangulation: cross referencing, peer debriefer, members’ check
findings

Findings

Questions 2 and 3

slide17
Question 2: What changes, if any, occurred in the participants’ stated beliefs about language learning, teaching, and acquisition?
  • Participants experienced affirmation of, as well as changes to, their beliefs about language teaching, learning, and acquisition.
  • Changes to their beliefs and patterns of practice were influenced by the areas in which they held more significant beliefs.
slide18

Bafa

Training

Becoming a reflective teacher

Patterns of

Practice

Parent Involvement

Role as a teacher of young students

Student Characteristics

slide19

Stacey

Training

Role of

Teacher of Special Needs Students

Patterns of

Practice

Professional Training

Student Characteristics

slide20

Florencia

Training

Role as Teacher of Bilingual Students

Patterns of

Practice

Personal Experience

Student Characteristics

changes
their definition of bilingualism

their understanding of language separation,

the need for balanced use of two languages in the classroom,

the need to explicitly bridge the transfer of knowledge and skills between the two languages,

student characteristics;

their role as teachers of diverse Deaf learners;

personal experiences as bilingual individuals;

professional training;

parent involvement;

the role of reflection in implementing a bilingual approach

Changes

Influences

question 3 what changes if any occurred in the participants instructional practices
Question 3: What changes, if any, occurred in the participants’ instructional practices?

Participants:

  • demonstrated their growing understanding of bilingual methodology and instructional strategies.
  • became more purposeful in their inclusion of ASL and English at the level most beneficial for their students.
  • applied bilingual methodologies to separate the two languages in their classroom.
observed bilingual practices
Observed Bilingual Practices
  • Language separation
    • English-only zone
  • Translation
    • Free
    • Literal
  • Fingerspelling
    • Sandwiching
    • Chaining
  • ASL interpretation strategies
implications
Implications

Teachers

  • willingness to examine their beliefs and experiment with new practices
  • value ASL and English as the languages of bilingual Deaf children
  • Recognize their critical roles in a bilingual Deaf classroom.
  • Active participants in the process of change
implications25
Implications

Staff Developers

  • design of professional development programs
  • voluntary participation

Administrators

  • Examination of own beliefs about and understanding of bilingual education
  • systematic training leading to school change
  • recognition of school culture
  • commitment to and support for training
questions
Questions
  • Thank you for your attention
  • Maribel.Garate@Gallaudet.edu