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REU: Mechanical Engineering University of Arkansas July 20, 2009. Plasma Diagnostics for the Deposition of Nanomaterials. Jay Mehta Undergraduate Student, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701, USA Faculty Mentor: Dr. Matthew H. Gordon

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plasma diagnostics for the deposition of nanomaterials

REU: Mechanical Engineering

University of Arkansas

July 20, 2009

Plasma Diagnostics for the Deposition of Nanomaterials

Jay Mehta

Undergraduate Student, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701, USA

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Matthew H. Gordon

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701, USA

Ph.D. Graduate Student Mentor: Sam Mensah

Graduate Student, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701, USA

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701

www.uark.edu

why alpha alumina
Why alpha alumina?
  • Many desirable properties:
    • high melting temperature (2053 °C)
    • Considered best anti—oxidation coating at high temps
    • corrosion resistance
    • chemical inertness
    • High mechanical strength and hardness (24GPa)
    • Great insulating properties
  • Applications:
    • Optical coatings
    • Thermal coatings
    • Dielectric films
    • Cutting tools
    • Biomedical implants

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701

www.uark.edu

goals
Goals
  • Long term:
    • Connecting spectroscopy results with film quality
    • Better understanding of alpha alumina
  • Short term:
    • Using OES to observe and study plasma in deposition chamber under varying conditions

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701

www.uark.edu

what is oes
What is OES?
  • Optical Emission Spectroscopy
    • Spectrometer captures data from captured photons
    • Produces a spectrograph
    • Relative intensity of peaks can be used to determine ion density

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701

www.uark.edu

equipment used
Equipment Used
  • ICM10
    • Midfrequency inverted cylinder AC magnetron sputtering system
    • Used for Physical Vapor Deposition
    • For our case depositing Alumina (Al2O3)
      • Target: Aluminum
      • Reactive Gas: Oxygen
      • Sputtering Gas: Argon

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701

www.uark.edu

equipment used1
Equipment Used
  • USB 4000
    • Interprets and captures an optical signal from the ICM 10 system
    • Compact and usb operated

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701

www.uark.edu

software used
Software Used
  • System Software:
    • Used to vary power and gas flow rates
  • Spectrasuite:
    • Used to with USB 4000 to collect optical data

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701

www.uark.edu

experiment
Experiment
  • Created recipes:
    • 4 Variables:
      • Pressure: 2-8 mtorr with 3 mtorr increments
      • Power: 4-6 kW with 0.5 kW increments
      • Total Gas Flow: 40-70 sccm with 10 sccm increments
      • Oxygen Partial Pressure: 35-75% with 5% increments
    • Time per run: 100 seconds
    • Integration time: 2 seconds
    • Scans per run: 1
    • Total scans: 540+

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701

www.uark.edu

results
Results
  • Peak identification:
    • Unable to locate Aluminum peaks
    • Many Argon peaks
    • Few Oxygen Peaks
  • Representative peaks:
    • Argon peak at 763.51nm
    • Oxygen peak at 777.194nm

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701

www.uark.edu

results1
Results
  • Argon Trends
    • Predictable
      • Increasing power=increasing intensity
      • Increasing oxygen partial pressure=decreasing intensity
      • Increasing pressure=slight increase in intensity
    • Outliers caused by pressure changes due to oxygen reactions

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701

www.uark.edu

results2
Results
  • Oxygen
    • Expected trends:
      • Linearly increasing oxygen intensity with increasing oxygen partial pressure
      • Increasing oxygen intensity with increasing power (graphs)
      • Fairly consistent results at higher pressures

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701

www.uark.edu

results3
Results
  • Oxygen
    • Notable:
      • Very low oxygen intensity at 50 sccm throughout experiments
      • Peak in oxygen intensity after 4.5-5 kW for 50 sccm
      • Unusually low intensity at 6 kW for Pr2
      • At higher powers Pressure didn’t have much effect
    • Jumps:
      • Between 55%-75% Oxygen at Pr2Tg40Pw4
      • Between 50%-60% Oxygen at Pr2Tg60Pw4.5
      • Between 55%-60% Oxygen at Pr2Tg50Pw4
      • Between 35%-55%Oxygen at Pr2Tg40 jump from Pw4 to 4.5
      • Between 55%-65%Oxygen at Pr2Tg40Pw4
      • Jump in intensity from 2 to 5mtorr for Tg50 all powers
      • Jump in intensity from 2 to 5mtorr for Tg60Pw4

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701

www.uark.edu

conclusion
Conclusion
  • Study jumps in oxygen intensities
    • Target poisioning
    • Pressure and power changes
  • Further experiments:
    • Hysteresis studies
    • observing aluminum vs. oxygen intensities
    • Test theories in deposition runs
    • Compare with Langmuir probe data

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701

www.uark.edu

reu mechanical engineering university of arkansas july 20 2009
REU: Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of ArkansasJuly 20, 2009

Questions?

  • Questions?

University of Arkansas

Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701

www.uark.edu